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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Louisville, Colorado
    Posts
    46

    Specialized Vita Comp Carbon vs Giant Thrive Comax 2 or ????

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    Hi Everybody,

    I'm not a newbie, been riding my steel 2009 Jamis Coda Comp very happily to work, errands, camping, you name it, it carries everything. And without any packs on it with its current setup it weighs in at 31 lbs (OK, there was half a water bottle). And it is tough to keep up with my buddies on the long weekend rides.

    So I'm thinking it's time to pull on my big girl bike shorts, master clipless pedals (ack!) and get a different bike for those longer group rides. Anybody have any thoughts on the

    Specialized Vita Comp Carbon

    or

    the Giant (from their Liv line) Thrive Comax 2

    I'm open to other ideas as well. Thanks in advance for any input!

    Marcy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    632
    Hi Marcy

    Are you set on staying with a flat bar bike or would you consider a drop bar bike? For long rides on pavement, I use drop bar bikes, exclusively. Drop bars offer a lot of advantages, one being all the various hand positions possible. By alternating between all the available positions, really helps me to reduce fatigue on long rides, not just in my hands and arms, but my back and so on. Another is being able to drop down and reduce my silhouette when fighting the wind. This can save me a couple of gears compared to a flat bar bike. Really noticeable in a stiff headwind. Being upright with a flat bar bike is comfy, for sure, but if you'e trying to keep up with a bunch of hardcore roadies on their fast drop bar bikes, you'll be at a disadvantage. Drop bar road bikes are more efficient for long miles on pavement. Not a deal breaker, by any means, but something to consider.

    I do like the lower gearing on the Specialized if you'll be fighting some tough hills. Also like the slightly wider tires when you hit some rough pavement spots. Both bikes have the new Tiagra components which are actually pretty darn good. Bought a new Tiagra equipped bike this year and had no complaints.

    Best of luck.

    Joanie
    Last edited by north woods gal; 08-27-2016 at 04:58 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Louisville, Colorado
    Posts
    46
    Hi Joanie,

    Thanks for the input, I really appreciate it. Yeah, I'd have to say I really do want the flat bar with some allowances for adjusting hand positions, and I definitely prefer a slightly more upright position. I mean I'm not the Wicked Witch of the West upright, but the racer, in the drops position is not for me, I'm not comfortable there. I'd say my friends, while much stronger/faster than I am, are not what I would call hard core roadies.

    Yep, definitely have some tough hills here in Colorado, so appreciate the comments on the gearing. As I like to be prepared for a variety of surfaces, your tire remarks are definitely welcome! I have Schwalbe Marathons on my Jamis. Glad to hear you like the Tiagras

    Marcy

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,829
    Quote Originally Posted by north woods gal View Post
    Hi Marcy

    Are you set on staying with a flat bar bike or would you consider a drop bar bike? For long rides on pavement, I use drop bar bikes, exclusively. Drop bars offer a lot of advantages, one being all the various hand positions possible. By alternating between all the available positions, really helps me to reduce fatigue on long rides, not just in my hands and arms, but my back and so on. Another is being able to drop down and reduce my silhouette when fighting the wind. This can save me a couple of gears compared to a flat bar bike. Really noticeable in a stiff headwind. Being upright with a flat bar bike is comfy, for sure, but if you'e trying to keep up with a bunch of hardcore roadies on their fast drop bar bikes, you'll be at a disadvantage. Drop bar road bikes are more efficient for long miles on pavement. Not a deal breaker, by any means, but something to consider.

    I do like the lower gearing on the Specialized if you'll be fighting some tough hills. Also like the slightly wider tires when you hit some rough pavement spots. Both bikes have the new Tiagra components which are actually pretty darn good. Bought a new Tiagra equipped bike this year and had no complaints.

    Best of luck.

    Joanie
    +1

    Have you had a chance to ride either of them? Fit is the most important thing.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    central NY
    Posts
    407
    Hi Marcy,

    Those are the same two bikes I looked at a couple of years ago, although I was looking at the aluminum versions. I don't want to click on the links and be tempted to get the carbon What I remember was the Thrive seemed to be priced better for comparable components. I ended up with the Vita simply because it fit better. I'm short, and I just couldn't get the Thrive to fit right. You're probably taller than me, so there should be more options for finding the right size.

    They're both nice bikes. Have fun and good luck!

 

 

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