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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    17

    Carbon post in carbon frame

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    Good morning..... I just purchased a new Ruby and for the first few days to adjust my seat post, I would loose the bolt and easily move the seat to where I wanted it. Now it feels like it is seized. I took it back to my LBS and they applied more carbon paste and said I might have to pound on the seat a bit to get it to move. I brought the bike home but it is no better and I don't think I should have to pound on it, that doesn't make sense to me but I am inexperienced so not really confident that I am right. From what I have read, the carbon paste is supposed to make things grippier and keep the post from sliding so I don't know why he would have applied more when the issue was that the post is stuck. I'm thinking of going back there this afternoon (an hour drive) but would like to have a better understanding of what should happen here. I have to move my post often to get bike in the car and I'm scared that pounding on the seat will cause damage to post or frame. anyone have any experience in this?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    california
    Posts
    1,227
    Carbon paste increases friction when under pressure, like clamping, and acts as a lube when not under pressure.

    You could try warming up the seat tube/post area with a hair dryer to expand it and then discharge an entire CO2 cartridge with an inflator at the joint of the seat post and the seat collar to cool and shrink that area. Personally I wouldn’t want to do any damage to the frame so I’d have someone who has done it a number of times at an lbs do it and take the responsibility. Also ask them or call Specialized about your moving it often to get in your car.
    Roof/Hitch mount racks ftw.
    ‘The negative feelings we all have can be addictive…just as the positive…it’s up to
    us to decide which ones we want to choose and feed”… Pema Chodron

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    18
    Sorry that I can't suggest a fix for your problem, but I would suggest that frequent lowering/raising a carbon fiber seatpost in a carbon fiber frame is probably not a good practice. Also, in order to prevent damage to the carbon fiber, tightening the seatpost collar should be done with a torque wrench.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    West MI
    Posts
    4,259
    How small is the back of your car that you are needing to remove your saddle? I drive a compact and have never had to do this -- granted, it's a hatchback. Perhaps the same size car with a regular trunk would make matters difficult.
    Kirsten
    run/bike log
    zoomylicious


    '11 Cannondale SuperSix 4 Rival
    '12 Salsa Mukluk 3
    '14 Seven Mudhoney S Ti/disc/Di2

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,897
    +1 on previous comments. I never change my saddle position once it's been set correctly. And I was also advised by the LBS to use a torque wrench if I did want to move and re-tighten the collar.

    I used to be able to get either my road bike or my mountain bike into the trunk of my old Camry by putting the rear seats down (there was an opening in the back wall of the trunk behind the seats, not the full width of the car but wide enough). I removed the front wheel, turned the handlebar and put the bike in front-first so the front fork went through the opening. I could also fit the whole bike in the trunk without putting the seats down if I took off both wheels. Either way the saddle never got in the way. Now I have a hatchback (Prius) with rear seats that fold flat so it's even easier.

    Is your saddle very high when you ride? Mine is about even with the handlebars, so not too high. Maybe that makes it easier.

    - Gray 2010 carbon WSD road bike, Rivet Independence saddle
    - Red hardtail 26" aluminum mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle
    - Royal blue 2018 aluminum gravel bike, Rivet Pearl saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver 2003 aluminum road bike
    - Two awesome worn out Juliana saddles

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,897
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    I always put it in rear wheel first, but whichever is easier, I suppose.

    Be sure to avoid lying the bike on the drivetrain side. The removed wheel will fit in easily. Sometimes, I keep an old yoga mat in the trunk to provide padding between the removed wheel and the bike.

    Honestly, the bike shop should have shown you how to load the bike without damaging it.
    Oh, one of my friends is always telling me that it's easier to put the rear wheel in first. For some reason the front is easier for me.

    I also put the front wheel on top of the bike, with an old fabric tote bag in between to keep the bladed spokes from scratching the frame. If I need to transport two bikes inside the car I put a blanket in between.

    One thing I've noticed on group rides is that everyone has developed their own way of loading their bike(s) in or on the car and securing things in place.

    And btw when it came time to replace my Camry, my #1 criteria for a new car was getting something that could fit my bike inside easily. I considered bringing the bike to the car dealer when I test drove the Prius, but decided that wouldn't be necessary after parking the Camry next to a neighbor's Prius and carefully studying the inside of their car. (In retrospect I'm luck the neighbor didn't see me doing it, they probably would have called the cops on me. ) I used to know a man who lived to play golf, and he did bring his golf clubs to the car dealer to make sure they fit in the trunk of the car he planned to buy.

    - Gray 2010 carbon WSD road bike, Rivet Independence saddle
    - Red hardtail 26" aluminum mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle
    - Royal blue 2018 aluminum gravel bike, Rivet Pearl saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver 2003 aluminum road bike
    - Two awesome worn out Juliana saddles

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    4,516
    Quote Originally Posted by ny biker View Post
    I used to know a man who lived to play golf, and he did bring his golf clubs to the car dealer to make sure they fit in the trunk of the car he planned to buy.
    We have brought both dog crates (when we had to have a golden retriever sized crate) and bikes to the dealer with us. If they don't like it - oh well. It made for some funny conversations, but no one objected.
    Most days in life don't stand out, But life's about those days that will...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    17
    Wow...ok, lots of great advice here! I am a newbie so this is all great. Thank you.

    I revisited my car loading technique and removing front tire, putting rear tire in first and moving seat forward are allowing me to get the bike in the backseat without lowering the seat. Progress!

    I will need to adjust the seat a few more times though until I find the right setting. I have knee issues and if I don't get it high enough, my knees will let me know. Too high and my soft tissue lets me know. Once I get this figured out than I won't touch it anymore.

    I did go back to lbs today (without my bike) and had one of the guys show me how to move my seat. The bike that he used to show me is the same as mine and when I tried it, the seat felt stuck, just like mine. These bikes don't have a normal seat collar with a bolt but have a wedge that sits in front of the post with a bolt in it. He loosened the bolt a few turns and then twisted the seat and it was loose enough to work with.

    Does anyone have a suggestion for a torque wrench? Something with a small handle since it'll be parallel to the seat post and hand under the saddle when I use it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by gingergirl View Post
    Wow...ok, lots of great advice here! I am a newbie so this is all great. Thank you.

    I revisited my car loading technique and removing front tire, putting rear tire in first and moving seat forward are allowing me to get the bike in the backseat without lowering the seat. Progress!

    I will need to adjust the seat a few more times though until I find the right setting. I have knee issues and if I don't get it high enough, my knees will let me know. Too high and my soft tissue lets me know. Once I get this figured out than I won't touch it anymore.

    I did go back to lbs today (without my bike) and had one of the guys show me how to move my seat. The bike that he used to show me is the same as mine and when I tried it, the seat felt stuck, just like mine. These bikes don't have a normal seat collar with a bolt but have a wedge that sits in front of the post with a bolt in it. He loosened the bolt a few turns and then twisted the seat and it was loose enough to work with.

    Does anyone have a suggestion for a torque wrench? Something with a small handle since it'll be parallel to the seat post and hand under the saddle when I use it.
    Wow, my Ruby is a 2011 model so I have no knowledge of the new wedge-type seatpost binder. I did a search for info and mostly drew a blank. (Note: I did find a video describing one guy's nightmare experience when he removed his seatpost. The moral of his story: Never totally remove the seatpost from the frame.)

    I couldn't find any torque specs for this type of binder on Specialized's web site. So my advice is (a) don't lower the seatpost in order to load the bike into your car, and (b) have the dealer do the loosening/tightening of the binder when you need the seat height adjusted.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Jean_TZ View Post
    I couldn't find any torque specs for this type of binder on Specialized's web site.
    I did find the value and will post in case anyone else is interested.
    If you google 2016 specialized ruby comp and click on the first link should bring up the bike (assuming your search results are the same as mine). Scroll down and on the left you see Manuals, Specialized owners manual, pg. 50 "Wedge Seat Collar" 6.2.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    17
    Thanks for all of the info Muirenn.

    I live in a small town, PEI Canada. We have 2 bike shops but neither offer fitting so going elsewhere isn't really an option. I've had bicycles all of my life so I do know how to change gears, etc. I had speed bikes when I was a kid, a 5 and then a 10 (does that show my age??) but this is my first road bike.

    The bike fitting article looks really good. I will give it a good read.

    Thanks again. Lots to absorb here.

 

 

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