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  1. #31
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    Helene - an interesting thing about past choices influences future ones... we worked for the state of Illinois for so long our healthcare is attached to the plans they offer. We discovered recently that Florida refused free funding from the federal government to expand medicaid (healthcare for people with little money), since we will fall into that category when we retire we will be without affordable healthcare. By moving back to Illinois we will be in a wonderful healthcare system that is very affordable for us. So, no matter what, we'd be moving back in the next five years or so.

    north woods gal - your retirement plan made me smile, mine was similar, only in a van. In many ways I'm very glad my beloved has slowed some of my wilder impulses.

    Electra Townie 7D

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Montreal, QC
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    774
    We're so close as countries but yet so not the same.

    Unless I am mistaking, our Canadian plan covers you no matter where you stay in Canada as it is a universal system paid through taxes. The new insurance takes effect 3 months after moving into the new province (for Ontario anyway). For instance, if I move from Quebec to Ontario, I get my new health card 3 months later, but still covered through my other province until then. It may mean that I might have to pay the doctor if I see him. But my Quebec plan will reimburse me until the new Ontario plan kicks in. Coverage varies from one province to the next.

    In Quebec, most prescribed drugs are paid by government (no wonder our taxes are so high), if you have no work plan, etc. It has something like a deductible (not too sure how it works as I have a work plan and I don't use provincial one). But in Ontario, no drugs are covered at all. So I suppose someone has to make sure they have other insurance to cover this if needed (may be an Ontarian can confirm this).

    Anyway, true that when you make some moves, you still have to do all the homework you can to avoid surprises. At least minimize it. And health is a biggie to think about.
    Helene
    Riding a 2014 Specialized Amira LS4 Expert - aka The Zebra!
    2015 Specialized Crux e5 - aka Bora Bora bike

  3. #33
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    california
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helene2013 View Post
    We're so close as countries but yet so not the same.
    Coming from France the whole health care system in the U.S. actually bothered me in the way it works….especially with the better examples of universal health care systems and national health insurance programs in other countries, France in particular. I wish more Americans would be thinking about and working for something better for themselves and others. Always being under a universal plan I guess I don’t see the value in the insurance/ pharma profit part etc. etc. and the states that are so uncaring for political and or religious reasons.
    ….'so it goes' vonnegut

    eta..then there is this way of finding a new home despite/through ‘urbanist scolds and bike share doctrinaires
    Last edited by rebeccaC; 05-26-2016 at 01:14 PM.
    ‘The negative feelings we all have can be addictive…just as the positive…it’s up to
    us to decide which ones we want to choose and feed”… Pema Chodron

  4. #34
    Jolt is offline Dodging the potholes...
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    Southern Maine
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pax View Post
    Does anyone else find such decisions, about moving to find the "right" fit, complicated by being half of a couple? My wife would do anything to ensure my happiness and wellbeing, but it is at the expense of her own, and I want the best for her. Leaving Florida would be physically better for me, but she is thriving here, she gets to go running/walking outside to the beach year round, she loves all the sunshine, she is just happier here.... makes my heart hurt to think about taking her back to the grey skies and long winters.

    Beyond the immediate concerns, I would love to be back in Chicago, back in the culture, diversity, and activity, but even though she was raised there, she finds the city overwhelming now (maybe because she's so introverted?). It's just difficult, after 26 years, to see how where we want to be can be so disparate.
    I can definitely see how being half of a couple could complicate matters, depending on the couple! I have seen couples where the partners have pretty much opposite preferences of what kind of place to live and am not sure how they work that out without it being a win/lose situation. Fortunately for me, my SO grew up in this area and doesn't feel a need to try living somewhere else…we also tend to have very similar preferences in a lot of things (we always joke that "great minds think alike"). I know people say that opposites attract, but I think that kind of a relationship would stress me out!
    2011 Surly LHT
    1995 Trek 830

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
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    Traveling Nomad
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    I definitely agree, Pax, that being half of a couple makes decisions on where to live harder! During our 31 years of marriage, we have moved quite a few times, and in most cases,, one of us was ever so slightly more gung-ho than the the other. And every lifestyle change/decision has been like that. Obviously we would never make these kinds of decisions unilaterally, but one person has to compromise his or her ideal choice more, perhaps.

    If I were single, I am quite sure I would still be living in NC, not nomadic at all. I would not be brave enough to live this kind of lifestyle alone, plus I'd get too lonely if I didn't have a partner, since I'm introverted, so making new friends can be tough. With my DH, I always have one built-in bestie!

    So, I am grateful to him because I think of how much I would have missed out on, so many amazing places and experiences, if he hadn't been driving these changes. Maybe your wife feels that way, Pax, and maybe she'll do just fine. As I mentioned in a previous post, when we moved to Florida, briefly, years ago, I loved it too, but I quickly adapted to life back in NC when we returned. And I was happy there too. I wish the same for your wife. But that doesn't mean that I don't feel your dilemma.

    BTW, our healthcare is through the Obamacare exchanges in Florida, and we've found it to be fine for us. We have a low-cost Florida Blue plan as we're both too young for Medicare. But we didn't have the choice of a better plan in NC as neither of us qualified for a retiree medical plan (we worked for the same private company for years, and they finally declared bankruptcy), If we'd had something like you describe in IL, leaving would have been much more difficult, and we probably would never have done it.

    I wish you peace with your decision, whatever it is.
    Emily

    2011 Jamis Dakar XC "Toto" - Selle Italia Ldy Gel Flow
    2007 Trek Pilot 5.0 WSD "Gloria" - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow
    2004 Bike Friday Petite Pocket Crusoe - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow

  6. #36
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    IL/FL
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    Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Emily.

    Sorry gals, didn't mean to derail the thread and make it about me.

    Electra Townie 7D

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
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    6,982
    I did a little half-fun, half-serious infographic about the 3 different Canadian regions where I've lived, worked and biked. I know, I choose some weird facts. And yes, there is a fact for comparative cycling experiences.

    A person can read a ton of info. about a region. But until one actually lives there for a few years, there are some things one has no clue if one is not at resident at all.
    While it's romantic to believe that good people don't think about race, ethnicity of others, influences attitudes, initial impressions, it's not realistic. I'm not going to kid myself that I would enjoy at midlife or close to retirement, to live forever in Spain or Germany. My gut feeling is being non-white, non native Spanish/German, one needs to become quite linguistically fluent in the language to even come close to being accepted as a "local". Even then, one still may be viewed slightly as an outsider. That's still no guarantee of relating to people on a equal footing.

    I love travelling abroad, but after a few wks., I like coming back to Canada....a country in spirit historically and now, is an immigrant based country that allows a person to start off fresh anew, a different life.

    Being here in the prairies, feels at times, like being stuck in the middle ..of vast open nothingness. In Alberta, the politics, funding matters on infrastructure, health care ends up with only 2 major cities (Calgary, Edmonton) vs. rest of rural Alberta. There are 3 other much smaller cities under 100,000. Guess where change has been driven from to redesign Albertan communities, include more and better multi-modal transportation systems, social justice programs......from people who have relocated from other parts of Canada/other countries. There are only 2 universities in Alberta ... so different from Ontario where it's a powerhouse of knowledge capital (over 8 large universities), more diverse industries, more diverse cultural activities, etc. Just going cycle touring you have towns, cities closer together for more enjoyable, less exhausting trip planning in southern Ontario. (But still, it's absolutely not like some smaller European countries where towns are even closer.)

    Am focusing on geography. It's amazing how a country's geography influences us so heavily for health, transportation, comfort...or even as physical barriers that creates at times unusual psychologically subtle fences. Living in British Columbia, it was easier to be lulled to think only of the Pacific coastal region....because there are several mountain ranges to cross to get to Alberta: Cascade, Monashee Mtns, Selkirk and then Rocky Mountains. It was just easier to forget about rest of Canada when living in British Columbia. It often stuns me when just flying between Vancouver and Calgary, just how much of Canada is sheer unhabitable wilderness.

    Am here in prairies because of a job, like many people who relocated to our city in the past 15 yrs.: it's either for a job or education. It is not for retirement unless one already has family/close friends. My vacation benefit limits me from returning to Vancouver often. But I do it when I can ..and he comes over to enjoy prairie /Rocky Mtns., especially when Vancouver has its heavier rainy season in late fall and winter.

    I enjoy living in a place with 4 distinct seasons-- even if winter anywhere in Canada means cold, some sloppy days. I do like some distinct drama in seasonal changes.
    Last edited by shootingstar; 05-27-2016 at 04:02 AM.
    My Personal blog on cycling & other favourite passions.
    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know what’s in a person’s heart.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
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    There is no doubt that geography and the land shapes and molds us. I spent most of my life on the prairies of the Dakotas and Nebraska and even though I dearly love our north woods of Wisconsin, where we live, now, I do miss my wide open spaces. I think you have to be raised there for it to really get in your blood, though if you live there long enough you can certainly appreciate it. If you're new to these vast landscapes, though, it can be intimidating and even unsettling. As kids, I remember cousins from Pennsylvania visiting us in North Dakota and they were genuinely terrified to be able to look miles in any direction without seeing a tree. Me, I loved it and still do.

    When it came time to retire, I knew my husband would have a hard time adjusting to such vastness, since he spent his whole life east of the Mississippi. We compromised and headed to the north woods and are quite happy, here. Still, I am haunted by my prairie memories and long to see and feel the wind blowing over miles of grassland. Of course, that prairie wind was an ever present factor in my bicycling. Calm days were a rarity.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 05-27-2016 at 07:14 AM.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    4,556
    Ah yes. Wide open spaces. I officiated RAAM last year and it was my first time seeing lots of open space. There was a fire on the course in the AZ desert, and the headquarters folks asked me to find it (yes, in fact, drive towards a brush fire in the desert with high winds). I was on the phone with emergency dispatch. They kept asking me how far away the plume of smoke was, and I had to quite frankly say I couldn't tell. They pushed for an estimate, and I was about 20 miles off. So hard to tell distances out there.

    I loved it, though. I prefer my large distances over water as opposed to land, though.
    Most days in life don't stand out, But life's about those days that will...

  10. #40
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    Jul 2005
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    IL/FL
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    So many different geographic areas, they really do seem to distill into a preference or a comfort level for many of us as we age. Wide open spaces are absolutely a part of me; if I go to the beach often enough I can get my fix, but when I can't get there for a while I start feeling really claustrophobic, it's very closed in here with trees and vegetation... as soon as I get back to the prairie and can see for miles, I feel like my mind can rest and I can breathe again.

    Electra Townie 7D

  11. #41
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    Since I've lived all my life in the east and usually surrounded by woods, forests always comfort me, even with the snakes, bugs, etc. I love the beach too, though, and am always drawn to water, be it an ocean, creek, lake, or river. The first time I visited the southwest US, I was absolutely enchanted by the desert and its special beauty; ditto for the first time in the plains and prairie with the big sky I'd never really seen in its entirety before. I love and appreciate all the different environments but do feel vaguely uneasy whenever I am in a place where there's a larger chance of tornadoes (and that can include my home state of NC at times as well, Florida, etc).

    When we moved to the KC area for a year, my mother was so worried about tornadoes that I had to do some research and determine that KC itself actually has very few tornadoes; most in Kansas are in the western half of the state where it's dead flat. In fact, the greater KC area is full of huge deciduous trees and hills! It's gorgeous and not easy cycling as I thought it would be at all. I sent Mom lots of stats I found online and eased her mind.
    Emily

    2011 Jamis Dakar XC "Toto" - Selle Italia Ldy Gel Flow
    2007 Trek Pilot 5.0 WSD "Gloria" - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow
    2004 Bike Friday Petite Pocket Crusoe - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    Concord, MA
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    I know I could never live in a prairie/open environment. One of things that bothered me the most about Miami and Phoenix was the flat brownness of each place. I love the desert, but unfortunately, like the song, "they paved paradise and put up a parking lot." You could see the mountains, but you had to travel a ways to be in real desert. So sad. The last time I was in AZ, we stayed in Cave Creek, which is far, far north of where I lived. In the boonies. But, it felt like real AZ. I also loved northern AZ, but alas, always said it looks just like NH! The beaches in Florida were nice when I was a teen and in college, but over the years, I have become less of a beach person, and more of a mountain person, thanks to cycling. I need to live near a coast, but not necessarily to sit on the beach! I like to walk on the beach, and observe the scenery, but beach towns hold no allure for me.
    I learned a lot, though from my moves. I like diversity of scenery and the ability to drive places that are different within 2-3 hours.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
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    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura

  13. #43
    Jolt is offline Dodging the potholes...
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    I don't think I could live in a prairie-type area either…no privacy when there aren't any trees! My grandparents, who are from Montana, have always said they feel claustrophobic from all the trees when they have visited us on the East Coast so it's definitely a matter of what one is used to. I just moved into a beach town, so will probably become more of a beach person just because it's so easy to get to…will be interesting to see how crazy it is around here now that summer is starting!
    2011 Surly LHT
    1995 Trek 830

  14. #44
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    God, I love Montana, the sky is so wide open it's like being inside a drop of water, the sky seems to drop away beneath your feet!

    Electra Townie 7D

  15. #45
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    north woods of Wisconsin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankin View Post
    I know I could never live in a prairie/open environment. One of things that bothered me the most about Miami and Phoenix was the flat brownness of each place. I love the desert, but unfortunately, like the song, "they paved paradise and put up a parking lot." You could see the mountains, but you had to travel a ways to be in real desert. So sad. The last time I was in AZ, we stayed in Cave Creek, which is far, far north of where I lived. In the boonies. But, it felt like real AZ. I also loved northern AZ, but alas, always said it looks just like NH! The beaches in Florida were nice when I was a teen and in college, but over the years, I have become less of a beach person, and more of a mountain person, thanks to cycling. I need to live near a coast, but not necessarily to sit on the beach! I like to walk on the beach, and observe the scenery, but beach towns hold no allure for me.
    I learned a lot, though from my moves. I like diversity of scenery and the ability to drive places that are different within 2-3 hours.
    Of course, in the remote areas where most of those plains and prairies are, you'll only have cows or maybe antelope for company. Some of the counties in this region have the lowest population density in the U.S. That lack of population, though, can also add to some folk's unease.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 05-27-2016 at 04:31 PM.

 

 

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