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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,854

    One more thing I don't need: is this sciataca?

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    Oy vey. This started two nights ago while I was sleeping on my left side. Pain from the back of my butt, a bit left of center, running down the entire left leg to the ankle, along the left side of the back of my leg, almost on the side of my leg. A few minutes after I got out of bed it went away and was I fine all day. Then it happened again last night, only worse.

    I can sleep on my back as long as I'm careful about the way I move. I'm mostly okay on my right side, again being careful about movements. I can't roll onto my left side without pain. But I can sit up on the side of the bed and then fall onto my left side and lie that way without pain. So certain movements and positions trigger it while others are okay, and I'm still figuring out which is which.

    Yesterday afternoon I did some leg stretches without pain. I'll try doing them again in a little while.

    I've had problems in the past with my sacroiliac but that was on the right side, where my knee and ankle problems have been (patella tracking problem, not serious, and ankle tendon problem, resolved surgically many years ago). Stretching and attention to posture generally keep the sacroiliac problem in check.

    Any thoughts? Thanks very much!

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,476
    Ouch, I have degenerative disc disease, and had lower back surgery when I was 30, so can relate.

    It's usually better for me to sleep on my side, but only with a firm pillow between my legs, and another under my top arm. This keeps my body and spine in alignment.

    Something very important with back problems is to avoid heavy lifting at all costs, forever. Difficult at first, but you just get to where you find other ways. There have been times when I just let something lay because it was risky to move it. My surgeon originally said to never lift more than 35 lbs. But often, my max feels more appropriate at 20 ish lbs. Also lift correctly, etc., so the back is not strained when doing.

    The only way they can actually verify is with an MRI. A couple of doctors just assumed it was muscular/skeletal when I started getting it checked out. I knew better, and demanded an MRI. Sure enough...

    IME, neurosurgeons are better for this than orthopedics.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,854
    I've been fine since I got out of bed and was able to do my usual leg and piriformis stretches without pain. I'll be seeing my personal trainer tomorrow, so I'll show him where the pain is to confirm that it's the sciatic nerve and not something else. I texted him about it and he's going to show me a few more stretches to add to my routine. He's an experienced PT with a degree in exercise physiology, so he's got a good knowledge of anatomy. He's helped me address problems without needing to see a doctor in the past, and I know he won't hesitate to tell me if he doesn't have the knowledge to help.

    So fingers crossed that I can nip this in the bud!

    Thanks.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    Ugh. Hope you get it sorted.

    I'll just add that I've been learning in the past few months that the psoas muscles are absolutely key to the whole lumbar spine and the lumbopelvic complex. Getting trigger points and adhesions in the psoas released is not in the slightest bit fun or comfortable, and stretching them is awkward, but it's made an ENORMOUS difference in my progress. Cycling does tend to shorten them, especially if you're not doing much of anything else at full hip extension.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

 

 

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