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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    1

    Road Cyclist - Camelbak?

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    Road cyclist do you ever use a Camelbak and if so which model works well. I am having to purchase one for health issues and I want to be sure i get a comfortable model. Is the Charm that much more comfortable than a non women specific model?

    Thanks,

    Judy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    I don't know about the charm, so I will list the ones I've liked. Just in case.

    The Camelbak Aurora (women) if you are up to 5'7" or so, the Camelbak Rogue if you are maybe 5'5" and up, depending on your torso length. It's longer on the back, which distributes the weight lower, which is good. So perhaps will work for more petite people, too: marketing isn't always correct. The Aurora has curved straps, so a little more comfortable in the straps. But both are good. The portion that touches your back is raised in channels, which means you sweat a lot less, and both feel smaller and lighter due to the slender design. Both are 70 ounces, but actually hold more like 60-64 ounces. They have outside pockets without being bulky.

    For me, the wider the pack, the less comfortable since it covers a wider distance across the back. (Sweat, yuck). Even if it holds less water. The Rogue is much more narrow than the Aurora. And the Charm appears wider than both, but you could look at the dimensions. (I can't tell what the portion that touches the back looks like with the Charm, but I do have a 50 oz Camelbak that looks similar and is completely flat, and very hot and uncomfortable).

    I actually am not likely to use a Camelbak on my road bike, but I do use it on my mountain bike. If you have a bike with a reasonably high head tube, it's fine for your back. If you are on a super aggressive bike (probably men's or unisex, but not necessarily), you might explore other options than a backpack.

    Why do you need it for health reasons? Can you not carry enough water on your frameset? It is fairly hard on your body to haul a backpack on a road bike.

    I was thinking about this hydration system from Showers Pass for my mountain bike, but didn't get it. I may, still. It attaches to the bike, and has storage for other things, too. Just a thought.

    This video shows the Aurora and the Rogue,
    there are other videos out there that are more detailed, though. REI also carries them.
    Last edited by Muirenn; 06-10-2015 at 07:46 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    I've occasionally used one, on longer rural rides in hot weather, when I know there won't be any place to refill my bottles or buy drinks.

    The most important thing for me is to loosen the shoulder and sternum straps so that most of the weight rests on my hipbones, on the lower strap.

    If you can find a shop where you can try on several models while sitting on your bike, that would be the best way. If you do that, bring something you can put in or strap onto the pack to simulate the weight of a full reservoir. I don't know much about cycling specific models, but I do know that hydration vests specific to running are MUCH better for running than the more widely available hiking packs, so I'd be looking hard at models designed specifically for cycling. Most of them will probably be tagged to mountain bikers, but unless you're riding in a super aggressive tuck, a mountain biker's pack/vest should still balance better on a road cyclist's body than a hiker's model.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    6,449
    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    I've occasionally used one, on longer rural rides in hot weather, when I know there won't be any place to refill my bottles or buy drinks.

    The most important thing for me is to loosen the shoulder and sternum straps so that most of the weight rests on my hipbones, on the lower strap.

    If you can find a shop where you can try on several models while sitting on your bike, that would be the best way. If you do that, bring something you can put in or strap onto the pack to simulate the weight of a full reservoir. I don't know much about cycling specific models, but I do know that hydration vests specific to running are MUCH better for running than the more widely available hiking packs, so I'd be looking hard at models designed specifically for cycling. Most of them will probably be tagged to mountain bikers, but unless you're riding in a super aggressive tuck, a mountain biker's pack/vest should still balance better on a road cyclist's body than a hiker's model.
    The Rogue and Aurora are designed for mountain biking. I have the Rogue--I got it because it was more narrow than the Aurora. I'd like to get the Aurora too and compare, but that would be a little excessive.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,352
    We each have 2. One holds 3 liters and the other is 1 or 1.5 liters. We use the smaller one for road and short mtb rides.
    2012 Jamis Quest Brooks B17 Blue
    2012 Jamis Dakar XC Comp SI Ldy Gel
    2013 Electra Verse

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    32
    Not camelbak but I do like Osprey hydration packs. They fit a lot better on my shoulders and the hydration back is rigid so it doesn't curve on your back.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Montreal, QC
    Posts
    773
    I have a 2 litre hydration pack that I use on hot and longer rides. It is not camelback but just same type of bag. Cheaper too. At least when I got mine.
    http://www.mec.ca/product/5032-787/m...q=sac%2Bgourde

    I still prefer the bottles now because the pack is "heavy" to have on your back, it does not let air circulate between skin and jersey and the "wobbling" of the water in the bag gets annoying. But I find it useful when doing longer runs. I don't like to ride without hands on the handlebar even for a short time so this is easier for me to get a drink a I clip the hose near my mouth and when I want a sip, it is just a second away.

    The fun thing is the bag although small, is roomy enough to put a few things in there also like arm warmers or snacks, etc.

    You have to try a few models to make sure you are comfortable with it on your back, and front.
    Helene
    Riding a 2014 Specialized Amira LS4 Expert - aka The Zebra!
    2015 Specialized Crux e5 - aka Bora Bora bike

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    17
    I have this hip pack for long days, winter riding, and trips on the tandem:

    http://www.inov-8.com/new/global/Pro...ro-4.html?L=26

    It holds a 2 Liter bladder, wind jacket, insulating layer, warm gloves, tools, snacks, wallets, maps, phone... in case you'd ever need to take your entire household with you...

    No sweaty back, chafing, or unnecessary shoulder tension, and I like that I can access the front pockets while riding. If you seal the seams it's also waterproof.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Montreal, QC
    Posts
    773
    Never seen that one. Will look it up also. How does it work when you say on hips. Doesn't it tend to fall off with the weight? I can't "vision" it right now.
    Helene
    Riding a 2014 Specialized Amira LS4 Expert - aka The Zebra!
    2015 Specialized Crux e5 - aka Bora Bora bike

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    Quote Originally Posted by amyp View Post
    Not camelbak but I do like Osprey hydration packs. They fit a lot better on my shoulders and the hydration back is rigid so it doesn't curve on your back.
    I really like the design of the Ospreys I've seen online, but haven't seen one in person.

    The women's Magic has a design similar to another I have, the Lobo. The Magic is 70 ounces. The difference is the Lobo is longer and leaner, even compared to smaller bladder women's packs. Again, more air circulation (The Lobo is 100 ounces, which is really too heavy to ride with frequently. I use it for hiking). I've had the Lobo since 2008, it is the most comfortable pack I own. The women's. You can see from the video how streamlined it is. Luxe is 100 oz,; the women's version of the Lobo. But it is wider.

    I prefer the strap designs on the women's models, and also the fact that they are shorter. The men's do hang a little too low on my back (I'm 5'7" with a short torso). Women's packs make up for being shorter by being wider, which is not good when it's hot. But that is just my preference.

    Quote Originally Posted by FahrRad View Post
    I have this hip pack for long days, winter riding, and trips on the tandem:

    http://www.inov-8.com/new/global/Pro...ro-4.html?L=26

    It holds a 2 Liter bladder, wind jacket, insulating layer, warm gloves, tools, snacks, wallets, maps, phone... in case you'd ever need to take your entire household with you...

    No sweaty back, chafing, or unnecessary shoulder tension, and I like that I can access the front pockets while riding. If you seal the seams it's also waterproof.
    I really like the idea of a Lumbar pack. My Surly Krampus only has one set of bottle cage boss's. (Size small). It's making me add to my collection of hydration packs and systems. It's actually 4 liters? That's over 135 ounces. That's a lot of water. Perfect for the trail! It doesn't bother your lower back?

    Edit: the description on the website reads 4 liters, and your post said 2. Is there more than one model? 2 liters sounds more reasonable for that size.
    Last edited by Muirenn; 06-11-2015 at 11:17 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    Edit: the description on the website reads 4 liters, and your post said 2. Is there more than one model? 2 liters sounds more reasonable for that size.
    The water reservoir (sold separately) is two liters. Total pack capacity is four.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    The water reservoir (sold separately) is two liters. Total pack capacity is four.
    Actually, it looks like they don't make that model anymore. When you go to 'buy online,' it's not listed. And a google search shows it as discontinued. Too bad. It looks nice.

    Camelbak does make a similar hip pack. But I really liked the model linked to.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    17
    Hi, sorry for the delay!

    I'm sorry the lumbar pack is no longer available. It may be because innov8 is designing more for fell running, and for that purpose, the newer designs--traditional running packs/vests but with the bladder secured at the bottom--are more effective. For inline skating the pack works fine, but when running it moves too much and the strap loosens.

    On the bike I hardly notice it at all. It just sits there, it doesn't rotate or slip, I don't feel the weight or even think about it unless I need something from it. It's certainly not any more disturbing than fully packed jersey pockets. And it's practical for me to have the tools and such packed in one place so I can get out the door faster, regardless of which bike I take.

    It holds a total of four liters, the bladder holds up to two liters and the rest is for whatever you want. If you don't use the space there is an elastic cord for compression on the outside, this also works for securing a rain jacket if the pack is full. (For example when hiking...) I usually take about a liter of water in the pack since 2 liters is actually pretty heavy, and if I drink that much I have to get rid of it at some point and then it's easy to refill it...

    Since it's no longer available, I won't elaborate on the design, but lumbar packs are certainly work considering if you like having unrestricted breathing and having easy access to whatever you take with you.

    Camelbak used to make some models that are often available on eBay...not a lot of people seem to be looking for them so you should be able to try one for very little money.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    I really like the appearance of this pack by Osprey. Appears very minimal across the back. Plus, it's available in different sizes. So, I'd say unisex.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

 

 

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