Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    7

    Question Returning to Riding need Support/Riding buddies?

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    Hello,

    I have read a few of the posts here about getting back into riding, but I still have a couple of questions. Three years ago I moved overseas and left my bike in Oregon. At that time I could comfortably ride 30-40miles and could do longer rides with food stops. My average speed was 13-14mph, if I remember correctly. I miss cycling so much and have replaced it with running (which I don't like nearly as much) while overseas. However, in three short weeks I will be returning to Oregon and will be able to pick up cycling again. I've been told that the best thing to do is to ride everyday. But I'm worried because I have always had problems with sore sit-bones (and just general rear-end pain).

    I will be in Eugene, Oregon at first (still looking for a job) and so I have access to pretty good cycling trails. My questions are:
    1) is there a "minutes or miles" per day goal to help me get my cycling body back?
    2) suggestions for dealing with sit-bone pain, or how to ease into it?
    3) are there any Eugene groups for "newbies". Essentially I'm starting from scratch, though physically I am in good shape.

    Thank you!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,479
    Get a bike fit since you've been off so long, position changes over time.

    Start a saddle search. Maybe read some saddle threads. (If you read the Summary of Saddle Info thread, start on page 7 or so. It's linked to a lot of threads that combine specific posts that are handy for overall general questions and how to get started on that).

    Welcome 'back!'
    Last edited by Muirenn; 05-06-2015 at 10:12 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,856
    Welcome back!

    Re: minutes/miles per day, I think that's up to you. Maybe start with an out-and-back on one of the trails, so it's easy to turn around and shorten the ride if you feel like you need to. Gradually increase your rides based on how you feel.

    What kind of running have you been doing? Maybe that could be your guide to where to re-start with cycling -- e.g., if you can run for 20 minutes, then try cycling for 20 minutes.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    7
    Thanks for the information, both of you.

    Just about 8 months before I moved overseas I bought a fizik saddle that seemed to really help with some of my saddle soreness, but it wasn't totally gone on long rides. My riding friends reckon I need better shorts...that is something I will be investing in (so suggestions are welcome).

    Do you think I should be re-fitted before I ride at all or after riding a bit so I know if there are problems?

    As for running, I can comfortably "jog" for about 6km (about 45min) without stopping (though here we are at a high elevation, it is wicked hot and there at too many hills). So I suspect I would be able to run better in "nicer" conditions. Or, well, I hope. Part of why I stop running (when out on a run) is from boredom, something I never experienced on the bike.

    Thanks, any other tips are welcome!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,479
    Ride a bit first.

    You're lucky, there are a lot of great fitters where you are going. In fact, I think Wahine, a TE forum regular, is in that area. Believe she is a McKenzie fitter and physical therapist.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    7
    Thanks!! Good to know. I need to find a job first, before I can pay for a fitting. :-)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,479
    Ha! Priorities...

    What do you do for a living?
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    7
    I am a teacher, high school social studies and English as a Second Language is what I have experience and licensure in. :-)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,479
    Were you teaching ESL overseas? Where were you, if you don't mind me asking.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    7
    Right now I am in Costa Rica, teaching History and "Thought". For the two years prior I was in the United Arab Emirates teaching English through Social Studies. Nope don't mind at all. If you are interested I have a blog where I've been documenting my life overseas: andreainuae.wordpress.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,479
    Cool. Will check it out.

    Can't imagine being in a Muslim country as a female. Wasn't that difficult?
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    7
    Hmmm. Well it is very Western there. Living in a new country has lots of challenges (CR is the third non-US country I have lived in) but, the UAE wasn't as difficult as you would think. If I were not white and obviously "Western" I would have had more problems for sure. But overall I wasn't affected much by the Islamic culture (in a negative way). There are many other difficult issues that had nothing to do with Islam. I think preparation was key, I knew about the rules well before I arrived so I was prepared and excited to experience a new culture. The hardest part was having to walk from the car to the shop in 120 degree weather in long sleeves and jeans!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
    Posts
    6,982
    Quote Originally Posted by andirae13 View Post
    Hmmm. Well it is very Western there. Living in a new country has lots of challenges (CR is the third non-US country I have lived in) but, the UAE wasn't as difficult as you would think. If I were not white and obviously "Western" I would have had more problems for sure. But overall I wasn't affected much by the Islamic culture (in a negative way). There are many other difficult issues that had nothing to do with Islam. I think preparation was key, I knew about the rules well before I arrived so I was prepared and excited to experience a new culture. The hardest part was having to walk from the car to the shop in 120 degree weather in long sleeves and jeans!
    I knew a woman worked in Dubai for a few months ...50 degree C weather. She came from the Philippines and has engineering college education.
    Sorry to say but some of the Middle Eastern countries have a lot to clean-up how they do treat some of their temporary (construction) labourers which includes their nannies from abroad.
    Last edited by shootingstar; 05-07-2015 at 03:51 AM.
    My Personal blog on cycling & other favourite passions.
    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know whatís in a personís heart.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by shootingstar View Post
    I knew a woman worked in Dubai for a few months ...50 degree C weather. She came from the Philippines and has engineering college education.
    Sorry to say but some of the Middle Eastern countries have a lot to clean-up how they do treat some of their temporary (construction) labourers which includes their nannies from abroad.
    You are not wrong at all. The Human Rights issues are atrocious. You'll notice that I no longer live there (primarily for this reason) and that I was clear to say that as a "white American" my life was easier than others. The realities of the country go far beyond what I think is appropriate conversation for a cycling forum and my own abilities, as I can only speculate or tell stories "I've heard". It is an interesting place to live, you'd never see the real UAE in a visit, but not somewhere that I could feel comfortable for longer than my work contract, and not somewhere I really have much desire to return to.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •