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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,475

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    I have a Tangle and a Viscacha for my commuter (CAADX). Really like them, though the Tangle can stick out and rub my thigh, which I don't like. If I push it more towards the drive side it's better. Somehow always sticks out to the left. Plus, I have a 535 effective TT, and use the size small, which fits perfectly. It wouldn't work on a bike much smaller. Maybe on a 52.5, but it would be scrunched a bit. It would definitely fit a water bladder. I use it for a pair of non-bulky shoes.

    Love the Viscacha, and would recommend the Pika (a little smaller). I have a lot of clearance under my saddle though, so it doesn't come close to hitting the tire. It's supposed to be a problem for some. Can be rectified with an extremely expensive harness they make, but I've heard of some people using straps to hold it up.

    Anyway, I hate things on my back, and wasn't happy with panniers when I tried them. Hence the Revelate.

    Oh, also have the Gastank for my Surly. And have eyed the Feedbag. Not sure If I need it, though.

    Yeah. Do love Revelate.

    I like the looks of the Wedgie, Oak. And LOVE the name!
    Last edited by Muirenn; 05-06-2015 at 04:47 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    On the topic of tools: most people pay attention to what tools their bike needs, but I also make sure to carry whatever my cleats need, which is usually a screwdriver of some kind. A loose cleat can derail a ride in a hurry!
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,140
    OK, I am challenging myself today and I am very nervous. Last year, I got invited to join an invitation only group of riders, through one of the other AMC leaders I ride with sometimes. I know a lot of the people in the group, from various other rides I've done. Most of them ride incredible amounts, some are former racers, marathoners, etc. They are all older, like me, and have slowed down. I met the "screening" process to join the group, but I haven't gone on any rides. Today, my friend is leading a ride and i would much rather do this, than drive 40 miles to the start of another group ride. He told me there's another newbie coming and he will keep the group under control It's a very hilly ride, just under 3K ft. of climbing. I do trust my friend, and it's not like I won't know where I am, so I could go back on my own.
    Wish me luck.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    Good luck Crankin! I'm sure you'll do fine.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,475
    Quote Originally Posted by Crankin View Post
    OK, I am challenging myself today and I am very nervous. Last year, I got invited to join an invitation only group of riders, through one of the other AMC leaders I ride with sometimes. I know a lot of the people in the group, from various other rides I've done. Most of them ride incredible amounts, some are former racers, marathoners, etc. They are all older, like me, and have slowed down. I met the "screening" process to join the group, but I haven't gone on any rides. Today, my friend is leading a ride and i would much rather do this, than drive 40 miles to the start of another group ride. He told me there's another newbie coming and he will keep the group under control It's a very hilly ride, just under 3K ft. of climbing. I do trust my friend, and it's not like I won't know where I am, so I could go back on my own.
    Wish me luck.
    Luck!

    And the group sounds a lot like the people I ride with, minus the invitation aspect. And the hills.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  6. #36
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,854
    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    On the topic of tools: most people pay attention to what tools their bike needs, but I also make sure to carry whatever my cleats need, which is usually a screwdriver of some kind. A loose cleat can derail a ride in a hurry!
    I keep an allen wrench in my bike bag. I don't remember why, but something I bought last year required that allen wrench and at the time I thought I might need to tighten whatever it was during a ride.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  7. #37
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,854
    Quote Originally Posted by Crankin View Post
    OK, I am challenging myself today and I am very nervous. Last year, I got invited to join an invitation only group of riders, through one of the other AMC leaders I ride with sometimes. I know a lot of the people in the group, from various other rides I've done. Most of them ride incredible amounts, some are former racers, marathoners, etc. They are all older, like me, and have slowed down. I met the "screening" process to join the group, but I haven't gone on any rides. Today, my friend is leading a ride and i would much rather do this, than drive 40 miles to the start of another group ride. He told me there's another newbie coming and he will keep the group under control It's a very hilly ride, just under 3K ft. of climbing. I do trust my friend, and it's not like I won't know where I am, so I could go back on my own.
    Wish me luck.
    Good luck and have fun!!

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Montreal, QC
    Posts
    774
    I don't think it's been mentioned, or I missed it, but on each of our bike we keep a $20 bill hidden, for emergencies.

    We also have in our tiny bags (we have a saddle bag and a top bar bag), a first aid kit in a ziplock. Does not take much room but may come handy.

    We also keep a copy of our medicare cards, and our provincial one. Just in case.

    Oh...also a sticker on our helmet that contains all our medical infos (doctor's name, our work group insurance contact, etc). Similar to this one, but a bit more discreet in colour (ours in white, with red letters)
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Helene
    Riding a 2014 Specialized Amira LS4 Expert - aka The Zebra!
    2015 Specialized Crux e5 - aka Bora Bora bike

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,475
    In the spirit of keeping tools simple, my favorite is the Parks MT-1 multi-tool. Fits anywhere, has allen, hex, and a flat screwdriver ends.

    I also like the AWS - 11 and 10. (Can't remember which I have, they are similar).

    For home use, I have the P-handled 4, 5, and 6 mm wrenches. So much easier than anything else to use.

    A pedal wrench is indispensable, especially if you have more than one bike. I use mine frequently.

    This three way wrench, though, has always been a waste of money for me. Hard to use as the protruding wrenches that are not in use tend to hit the bike when turning. Doesn't fit in a saddle pack. And since I have the straight ended one rather than the one with the little ball-shape, it doesn't work that well to grip.
    Last edited by Muirenn; 05-06-2015 at 10:22 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  10. #40
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,854
    My multitool is very small. I'm not sure what's on it, but I do know that the phillips head screwdriver on it is the best one I have. It seems to fit all the screws in my house better than all the full-size screwdrivers in my toolbox. It does not have a spoke wrench, though the larger multitool that I have for my mountain bike does include one.

    After the Great Broken Spoke Adventures that I had last year, I bought a small spoke wrench that can fit three different size spokes. It is quite dense -- heavier than you would expect for something so small. I also bought a kevlar fiber spoke to use in emergencies. I practiced using both of these items on the old wheel with the broken spoke, per the advice of a friend who has been there, done that. Then I put them in a ziptop bag along with my patch kit and a tire boot, and they are now all in my seat bag.

    I use a handlebar bag on longer daytime rides. (Given my relatively narrow handlebars, there is no room for both the handlebar bag and my headlight on night rides, but those tend to be shorter so I don't need as much gear). During non-summer seasons I keep a mylar blanket in the handlebar bag. I also use it to hold my cleat covers and snacks, along with extra clothing that I might want to add or remove during the ride. I've also been known to use it to carry treats that I pick up at rest stops and want to enjoy later, like the chocolate-dipped strawberries that I got at a strawberry festival last year.

    I'd been using a small handlebar bag from REI, but recently I found one that's slightly larger at ****'s Sporting Goods, so I'm going to give that a go. The one from REI is usually adequate but in winter I sometimes need more room for extra clothes. And more room for chocolate-dipped strawberries is never a bad thing.

    For ID, money and insurance cards -- I have two wallets. One is the leather wallet that stays in my purse and holds things that I never bring with me on a bike ride. The other is much smaller. I use it for my driver's license, insurance card, credit and ATM cards. When I'm going for a bike ride, I bring the smaller wallet with me, and when I'm not riding I transfer it back to my purse. I keep my cash in both wallets, or transfer it from one to the other as needed.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,140
    I lived to tell the tale.
    51.3 miles
    3,116 ft. of ascent
    average 13.9
    top speed 31 mph

    OK, that average looks slow, but the climbing, OY! Normally, I'd be at around 12.5 on a ride like this. Plus, my first 50 miler of the year and it's fricken hot out (anything over 70 is hot for me).
    It was me and 8 guys. They were great, they said I was fine and I could ride with them any time. A few went ahead at times, some stayed behind me, and my friend, Jack, stayed with me on the climb up to the MIT Lincoln Lab site. I've done this before, and I was dreading it, as there's no shade. We thankfully stopped up here, so I could drink half my bottle of Skratch and eat a Shot Block. I felt numb. We were really near the lunch stop at this point, but of course, 5 more miles of hills through the neighborhood I lived in 25 years ago. My old street was repaved (used to be a death trap for cyclists) and was so glad I was going DOWN the hill (yeah, I've lived in 2/3 houses in MA on the top of big hills). I fell behind here, but just a little, I could see everyone... was kind of out of it when we got to the lunch place, but I hid it well, and some iced coffee and a small egg white/veggie wrap revived me a bit. I knew we would be doing some smaller hills to get back to Jack's house, but the last one did me in. I did lose sight of the group until I crested it, but they waited for me. We were within 5-6 miles of the end, and I had to dig deep. There was no way I was going to fall back too much. Sheer will got me through it. Felt kinda numb/dizzy when I stopped, but I know it's the heat plus exertion. I need to slowly build up to riding in warm weather, let alone do this kind of climbing. I accepted the offer to sit on Jack's porch and drink iced tea with a few of the guys, plus Jack's wife, who is also an AMC leader. She had just got home from leading a hike. By the time I left, I was fine.
    I know I should do this more often. I was really anxious the whole time, and I really had to practice the stuff I teach my clients.
    Drinking wine right now.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura

  12. #42
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,854
    Congrats!

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    141
    I use this tool roll http://eh-works.com/collections/bike-tool-rolls

    I really like it because when I don't have much, it rolls up really small. But when I need to carry more, it can expand quite a bit. If what I have doesn't fit well in a pocket (like my rain jacket), I can just roll the item up as part of the roll itself. It has been a really versatile thing for me. Our household started with one, and I think that between me and my husband, we now have at least four of them.
    1980-something Colnago
    2010 Jamis Quest
    2013 Wabi Classic

    mebikedolomitesoneday.wordpress.com

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,475
    Quote Originally Posted by khg View Post
    I use this tool roll http://eh-works.com/collections/bike-tool-rolls

    I really like it because when I don't have much, it rolls up really small. But when I need to carry more, it can expand quite a bit. If what I have doesn't fit well in a pocket (like my rain jacket), I can just roll the item up as part of the roll itself. It has been a really versatile thing for me. Our household started with one, and I think that between me and my husband, we now have at least four of them.
    Which model (size) do you prefer? That is really nice.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    141
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    Which model (size) do you prefer? That is really nice.
    Wow--I grabbed the link quickly, and didn't even notice that they have more than one model now!

    I use the Essentials. I usually have 1-2 tubes, a couple tire levers, a multi-tool, a patch kit, and tweezers in it. For a longer ride, I'll sometimes put a ziploc with baby wipes in there, and it often ends up holding spare clothes too.
    1980-something Colnago
    2010 Jamis Quest
    2013 Wabi Classic

    mebikedolomitesoneday.wordpress.com

 

 

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