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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Uncanny Valley
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    Yeah okay ... it's just I have very often had tubes stick to tires when I haven't powdered them enough. Maybe it depends on the tire, I don't know why my experience is different from yours, but I can say from experience that it happens, and happens often.

    Stick hard enough to tear the valve - honestly, no, but stick hard enough that I had to pull very hard to get it out. Not just tacky, completely stuck, and I can't imagine that over time, a tube that didn't move independently of the tire wouldn't wind up with a torn valve.



    Not that it's here nor there, but slicks on skinny road tires give more friction (traction) than tread, at least when pavement is dry. Fewer interruptions in the contact patch means a larger overall contact patch. There's usually some slight modification to the sides to allow water to be channeled out in heavy rain to reduce aquaplaning, but everything I've read says that the contact patch on skinny bicycle tires is so small that channelling water is largely unnecessary. Wider road tires have more channelling, but that's a compromise so that you can use the same tires safely in both wet and dry conditions - in the dry, slicks would still have more traction on the road. Off-road tires, or ice tires, have lugs or studs to increase traction on irregular or low-friction surfaces - lugs increase the amount of contact when the surface is irregular, studs dig into ice and create friction where otherwise the tire would just slide.
    Last edited by OakLeaf; 05-04-2015 at 05:16 AM.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    1,686
    That's interesting. It's never happened to me or anyone I know, but all my biking buddies are high mileage road cyclists, triathletes and/or cyclocrossers in the midwest and DC area. Nobody I know would leave a bike outside, in the sun, when not in use (if it can be related to high temperature).

    Edited to add: In case it is a tire specific issue, I have experience with the following tires: Conti GP 4000S II (a lot of my friends use this one and I've used it for years, too... must be because of this), Vittoria Open Corsa CX III, Vittoria Open Pave, Clement PDX, Challenge Gravel Grinders. A couple of people I've met use the Conti Gatorskin or Michelin Pro 4. I always use whatever butyl tubes are available at any bike shop; for latex tubes, just Vittoria.
    Last edited by pll; 05-04-2015 at 05:13 AM.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
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    14,645
    Weird, because all I've used for years has been the GP4000S, and it's happened with those, with the Michelins that came stock on my road bike, as well as tires I can't even remember going back into the 1980s. And like you, mostly it's whatever butyl tubes the shop has. My mileage varies a lot, probably my highest mileage years have been back in the late 80s early 90s when I wasn't counting but had to have been doing 7-10K miles, more recently it's varied between less than 1000 after my injury to 5500 miles a year or two before.

    I certainly don't leave my bikes outside either - the roadie might be outside for an hour if I'm stopping for a meal, but that's all. The commuter might get parked for a few hours at a time, but I've only ever had road tubes stick to the tires. I don't think my climate in Ohio is much different from yours in the DC area - I graduated from high school in Annapolis, MD, which is slightly warmer than what we have here. I don't honestly think it's temperature related, but anyway temperature gets much higher in use than just from solar heating - during the daytime, the road surface can be much hotter than the ambient air, plus the heat generated by the rolling tire can be significant. Just like you always check the tire pressure in your car after it's been sitting overnight.
    Last edited by OakLeaf; 05-04-2015 at 05:30 AM.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    1,686
    Truly weird. Maybe it's the rims? But until 2012 (when my friends nudged me over to the gear geek dark side), I never paid any attention to my rims and had the stock ones.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,856
    Maybe relative humidity has an effect?

    I've never had a problem with tubes getting stuck to tires, fwiw. I don't do anything special -- take the tube from the box, put it in a zip-top plastic bag and put that in my seat bag. Spares live in the duffle bag I use for bike gear, which sits in the hot car during long summer rides.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Columbus, IN
    Posts
    221
    Quote Originally Posted by pll View Post
    In case it is a tire specific issue, I have experience with the following tires: Conti GP 4000S II
    I recently tried the Conti GP4000S II, and I loved how they felt, but they just really didn't stand up to use. I had a WEIRD trainer incident (kid and dog were playing, stuffed animal flew and got stuck in my derailleur, which broke the derailleur hanger). Somehow in all of that mess, a huge piece of rubber was torn off of the rear tire (about the size of a quarter) showing the threads on a tire with only about 100 miles. The bike shop guy said he never saw anything like it. Thinking it was a weird catastrophic mess, I bought another. Then, earlier this season I had the front tire blow, when it had about 300 miles on it. There was a small place in the sidewall where the rubber was worn down to the threads, and was cut. I don't remember hitting or rubbing anything catastrophic. I'm wondering if I have just had terrible weird luck, or they're really fragile tires. I bought two Conti 4 season tires (bike shop guy told me they were like Conti GP 4000SII, but more durable), but I've held onto the one 4000SII tire I still have just in case I need a spare and because I really liked how they felt on the road.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    1,686
    Another thought: the rim tape you use could be really tacky? I think I have Zipp rim tape on both of my wheelsets (road and cross).

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    1,686
    Quote Originally Posted by Aromig View Post
    I recently tried the Conti GP4000S II, and I loved how they felt, but they just really didn't stand up to use. I had a WEIRD trainer incident (kid and dog were playing, stuffed animal flew and got stuck in my derailleur, which broke the derailleur hanger). Somehow in all of that mess, a huge piece of rubber was torn off of the rear tire (about the size of a quarter) showing the threads on a tire with only about 100 miles. The bike shop guy said he never saw anything like it. Thinking it was a weird catastrophic mess, I bought another. Then, earlier this season I had the front tire blow, when it had about 300 miles on it. There was a small place in the sidewall where the rubber was worn down to the threads, and was cut. I don't remember hitting or rubbing anything catastrophic. I'm wondering if I have just had terrible weird luck, or they're really fragile tires. I bought two Conti 4 season tires (bike shop guy told me they were like Conti GP 4000SII, but more durable), but I've held onto the one 4000SII tire I still have just in case I need a spare and because I really liked how they felt on the road.
    I never had an issue with the Contis GP 4000s. I only had a gash on the side of one last year, during the winter, but I hit some piece of wire that left a "bite mark" on my rim... and a 1 inch gash on the side of the tire. Given the mark on the rim, I think any tire would have suffered the same fate.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    2,559
    Buy a little glass bottle or rubber cement, and use it for patching tubes at home. Those tiny tubes of glue that come in patch kits are often semi-dried out before you open them and the glue just doesn't work well.
    Oil is good, grease is better.

    2007 Peter Mooney w/S&S couplers/Terry Butterfly
    1993 Bridgestone MB-3/Avocet O2 Air 40W
    1980 Columbus Frame with 1970 Campy parts
    1954 Raleigh 3-speed/Brooks B72

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Columbus, IN
    Posts
    221
    I also carry individual packs of grease wipes with my tire changing kit. It's nice to wipe my hands off after doing anything on my bike (am I the only one that can't do anything to a bike without getting grease or dirt on my hands?) I've handed a lot out on rides to others when people are messing with dropped chains and such.

    Plus one on having several CO2 cartridges. I always seem to do something weird with the inflator and lose half of it when I only have one cartridge (never happens when I have a spare or two. Murphy's law I guess).

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,478
    Wipes, and disposable gloves.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    Another sort of unusual thing I keep in my kit is a mylar blanket. Doesn't take much space, only weighs a few grams, but if something should happen - even just a mechanical - hypothermia can set in quickly.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,478
    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    Another sort of unusual thing I keep in my kit is a mylar blanket. Doesn't take much space, only weighs a few grams, but if something should happen - even just a mechanical - hypothermia can set in quickly.
    I've seen a lot of interesting things you mention taking with you.

    Question: what kind of pack do you use? I have room for a tire changing kit and little else. Do you bring these things on daily rides, or special rides where you expect to be further away?
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    Right now I have the Specialized Wedgie - it's about to fall apart, and I'll probably get another one like it. It's big for a road bike, but not terribly excessive. Bottom line is I carry an Epi-Pen, and that thing is so long and unwieldy that it leaves a lot of room for other stuff in my seat pack.

    I have two multi-tools, one much more comprehensive (so heavier and larger) than the other, but choosing between them isn't so much about shorter vs longer rides as it is about the area. If I'm riding in Ohio, I'm liable to be out of cell phone range for a lot of even a short ride, and a long drive from anyone who might be able to pick me up if I could reach them. In Florida, there are so few rideable roads that it's just loop-de-loop around town, and getting home from a major mechanical is no big deal, so just 4 and 5 mm Allen wrenches are plenty.

    The spare cables and chain links stay in there all the time even though I probably wouldn't use them in the field if I had a ride handy, just because the space and weight they take are negligible, and it's simpler to just leave them there.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    1,686
    I tend to be a minimalist on most my rides, but I've seen this very cool bags for longer, self supported, rides: https://www.revelatedesigns.com

    The 'mountain feedbags' (under cockpit) look pretty handy, big enough for a bidon, very accessible. Since I don't like things on my back, I may try those for longer rides where I want to minimize stops. The 'tangle' frame bag can fit tools and maybe a water bladder.

 

 

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