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Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Twin Cities, Minnesota
    Posts
    486

    I thought I would give up cycling . . so I haven't been around

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    I had another mishap last September and put my bikes up for sale. I didn't try very had to sell them so of course nobody bought them. It's hard to sell bikes in the fall anyway. So I decided I would try bicycling this year. I'm not sure how I serious I was about quitting riding because I signed up for the MS150 this year, not that I have to ride it.

    Most of my troubles have been the result of inattentiveness to my surroundings because I kept checking my HRM or the Garmin. So . . . I took the stuff off the bicycle and put it away and this happened:

    I have gone on three rides and loved them! No technology. Wow . . so much fun. I didn't feel like it had to check things to make sure I was doing as well as everyone else. Who cares when you have no data. And of course, I paid more attention to everything. I still can't believe what a difference not having that stuff makes! The rides were just so enjoyable. I don't know how fast I went, my average speed, how many miles I rode, my average heart rate, calories, burned, etc. And it didn't bother me like I thought it would!

    Nice weather, too! Who would have thought it would be 67 degrees in March in Minnesota!
    kajero
    2013 Trek FX 7.6 WSD
    2012 Specialized Ruby WSD
    2004 Schwinn (I think that is the year)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,897
    Welcome back! Glad you're having fun.

    - Gray 2010 carbon WSD road bike, Rivet Independence saddle
    - Red hardtail 26" aluminum mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle
    - Royal blue 2018 aluminum gravel bike, Rivet Pearl saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver 2003 aluminum road bike
    - Two awesome worn out Juliana saddles

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,394
    Glad you didn't sell your bikes!
    I use technology, but I don't attempt to manipulate anything when I am riding. I have my main screen set to show only my current speed and cadence, as well as distance. That stopped me from obsessing about my average. I look at my average when I stop or at the end of the ride. Riding should be fun. If you're not training to race, the metrics shouldn't be the #1 thing you are looking at.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura
    2017 Specialized Ariel Sport

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,301
    I'm with Crankin. Mine shows temp, distance and speed, that's it. If it's a distraction you don't need it. Biking is for fun, not stress ☺
    2012 Jamis Quest Brooks B17 Blue
    2012 Jamis Dakar XC Comp SI Ldy Gel
    2013 Electra Verse

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    959
    Glad to hear that you are enjoying riding!! I tend to do the same thing several times a year, and wonder quite often why I choose to ride with all of the technology... sometimes HA!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Boise Idaho
    Posts
    1,162
    So nice to read. I have nothing on my bike beyond lights. People ask me how far did you ride or how fast did you ride and I just smile and say I have no idea. This last weekend The Bike Hermit spent 2 nights and 2 days riding in the Owyhee Desert with the Owyhee Wilderness Rangers becoming "leave no trace" certified (Yes, it was extremely hard for me not to go, but the foot isn't quite there) Anyhow he commented about the 3 "youngsters" (in their late 20's) who were on the ride and how they seemed to race up every hill and rush to the next designated stopping point and that seemed so bizarre. We have certainly moved in a different way to just enjoying each moment.
    May you continue to rediscover the joy of being on your bike!
    Sky King
    ____________________
    Gilles Berthoud "Bernard"
    Surly ECR "Eazi"
    Empowering the Bicycle Traveler
    biketouringnews.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,501
    Welcome back kajero! Keep staying safe.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Suburban MA and Western ME
    Posts
    1,815
    Quote Originally Posted by Crankin View Post
    If you're not training to race, the metrics shouldn't be the #1 thing you are looking at.
    Even if you are, it shouldn't be the #1 thing you are looking at! I typically don't look at too much data while riding, but analyze it afterward instead. And the best rides are when the technology goes in the back pocket for the ride .

    Welcome back, and enjoy the ride!

    SheFly
    "Well behaved women rarely make history." including me!
    http://twoadventures.blogspot.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,394
    That's exactly what I do, SheFly. I analyze it all afterwards. Let's face it, I may not be racing, but it's pretty obvious if I am having a good day or bad day!
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura
    2017 Specialized Ariel Sport

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Katy, Texas
    Posts
    1,811
    every now and then a list comes by about the first x number of things people do after a ride. The first one is always " check your stats."

    My list goes
    1. run into the house and use the facilities. I don't often stop for much longer than a stop light when I ride.
    2. let the dogs out. They hear me in the garage and it makes them barking crazy
    3. grab a chocolate milk or finish my electrolyte drink. Thinking rehydration and the precious first half hour.
    4. put my bike on the rack and check the tires, brakes and chain. It's by way of an early warning system for maintenance.
    5. Clean as needed, lube, pump up the tires and wipe down the bike, Ad my dad used to say "never put your ride away rid hard and put up wet."
    6. let the dogs in before they go crazy and anger the neighbors
    7. Shower and put on clean clothes. Ahhhhhhh.
    8. eat a meal slowly and taking deep breaths and pausing frequently to relive the ride.
    9. Take a recovery nap.
    10. check my stats and download so it clears out my garmin for the next ride.
    marni
    Katy, Texas
    Trek Madone 6.5- "Red"
    Trek Pilot 5.2- " Bebe"


    "easily outrun by a chihuahua."

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    4,066
    Haha, since most of my rides are commutes my list is more like: stuff bike into shed, try to remember to recharge front light, pet cat, go pee, fetch wood, build fire, consider dinner, play with cat, shovel snow for cat, start some laundry, make dinner, feed cat. Sometimes I make it all the way to bedtime before getting out of my bike gear.
    Winter riding is much less about badassery and much more about bundle-uppery. - malkin

    1995 Kona Cinder Cone commuterFrankenbike/Selle Italia SLR Lady Gel Flow
    2008 white Nakamura Summit Custom mtb/Terry Falcon X
    2000 Schwinn Fastback Comp road bike/Specialized Jett

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
    Posts
    6,984
    Great you enjoyed your ride, kajero!

    I gave up on technology stats. over a decade ago. First few years were a great motivator for cadence, ride mileage and wrote it down in a journal.
    Then I just gave it up one day. I do have a rough idea of total mileage for a ride since locally I do a lot of routes that I rely heavily or can piece together. Then my partner gives me the out of town trip mileage that we do.
    My Personal blog on cycling & other favourite passions.
    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know whatís in a personís heart.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Portland Metro Area
    Posts
    859
    I'm a recreational rider and I used to have a wireless device on my bike. I was always checking my time, distance, etc. Then I acquired other bikes and didn't want to have to move the device between bikes. Finally I removed it and I now don't pay attention to metrics. I suppose if I was trying to improve my cadence, etc. it would be helpful. For me, though, I just ride.
    "Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls & looks like work" - Thomas Edison

 

 

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