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Thread: Winter Gloves

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    6,466

    Winter Gloves

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    I'm commuting mornings this winter. I use the term 'winter' loosely. I'm on the SE coast, so no snow. (About 280 miles north of Jacksonville, FL). But, I'm at sea level, and the wind off the ocean is cold. So I need toasty gloves that will keep out the chill. Lowest temp probably in the 30's.

    Suggestions? I see the Gore wind stopper, Lobster claws, some nice ones by Pearl Izumi, but can't tell from descriptions.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
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    I still have my Gore Wind Stoppers. I like them, but they are designed to stop the wind, not so very warm. I need to wear a thin pair of wool gloves under the Gores, indeed I need to do this for non-riding use as well. I hope that helps.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
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    14,645
    Even with my Raynaud's, my Ibex Kilo II gloves are enough if it'll be into the 40s within an hour after I start. The current model is called Point Six Two, they look like the same thing, don't know what the updates might be. I think if you have normal circulation in your fingers, they'd be plenty.

    I just got a pair of ski gloves for running in temperatures colder than that. Tried on mittens, which would be better in terms of keeping my fingers warm, but just really felt claustrophobic in them. Which gives me an idea of how much awareness we lose in our feet by wearing shoes most of the time ...
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
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    13,130
    So, I am very picky about dexterity and winter gloves. My go to solutions are1) light weigh long fingered gloves by Terry. 2) same gloves with silk liners 3) same gloves with Smart Wool merino liners.
    Then I have a pair of Mavics that are men's gloves, in a small that have a fleece lining. I can wear these down to about 38-40. But, I can also wear above combo #3. I also have a pair of PI Amphibs. I can wear them in the 30s, but my fingers feel like they are being squeezed, and hence I feel like i can't shift. Like Oak says, I feel claustrophobic! They are mediums, so they are not too small. If I ride in the 30s, I end using combo # 3 with chemical heaters. I bought a pair of lobster gloves and couldn't use them. Igave them to my son, who has little hands.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    17
    Hi Muireen,

    I can tell you about the two pairs I have from Pearl Izumi, "cyclone gel" and "soft shell elite."

    This evening I'll take some pictures so you can see the differences in fit/bulk, which are are pretty significant, in case you can't try them on in person.

    I grew up in Georgia, but live now in northern Germany, so "winter" means something different now than it did when I was a kid! My initial thought is that the cyclone is more suited to your described needs--keeping the wind off so your hands can retain their own warmth--anything more feels nice and cozy in the store, but is uncomfortably bulky and probably even sweaty on the bike. But I should refrain from making a recommendation and just tell you about my experience, since the final choice is dependent as much on the kind of riding you're doing as on the temperature/wind chill.

    On the packaging the cyclone gel are rated for 45-55F. They're a close-fitting wind proof soft shell with a thin fleece lining on the back side of the hands and and even thinner synthetic layer behind the synthetic suede/gel on the palms. They don't have have a separate insulating layer or feel especially soft and fleecy inside, so they don't seem "toasty," but rather thin and very grippy. The neon yellow patches and reflective branding make it impossible for cars to overlook my signaling, (and easy for my riding partners to see how far behind I was recently my first time on single track trails!) Dexterity is good; in addition to shifting and braking with no slippage, I can use a smart phone, open an energy bar, or remove the tires and find the hole (but not patch it) without taking them off. They extend past the wrist about 1,5cm further than summer cycling glove, where there is also a small Velcro closure, so it's possible to regulate temperature easily with sleeves. The nose wipe panel is a nice touch, and also effective for demisting the glasses in a light drizzle... I wash them regularly and they dry overnight. For steady moderate rain I can recommend them, as it's impossible to tell in those conditions if the water is from the outside or inside; my hands are clammy but not cold, and they still hold off the wind excellently. In a surprise heavy rain my hands are wet in about 20m. (There's not much one can do to be comfortable in that except find a cafe...) I haven't used them in long lasting driving rain; there's seal skinz for that.

    These are my go-to gloves when I need gloves but don't want to notice I'm wearing them. They're small enough I keep them in the pocket when it starts getting dark earlier, even if it's not yet cold, I feel more visible in traffic. They're my winter gloves for the road/cyclocross bikes even in below freezing temperatures, well below the temperature rating of 45F. It's worth noting that the gel is 2,5mm thin.

    The soft shell elite is rated from 25-35F on the packaging. The outer is a synthetic soft shell with similar reflective branding to the cyclone. (It also comes with neon yellow panels but I ordered a more subtle grey/black version.) This is followed by a layer of prima loft one insulation, covered by a soft fleecy inner. "Toasty" is a good word for them, like most prima loft products you feel the heat close to your body when you put them on indoors. The glove and insulation extend 7cm past my wrist where there is a substantial Velcro closure. The extra insulating layer and a generally more generous cut result in a much bulkier glove that doesn't grip as well. The first two fingers have the same sticky coating as the cyclone, so I can shift and brake from the drops without slipping, but I have to take them off to use a smartphone (no electricity transfer), or use a zipper or the multi-tool... I find the multiple layers really affect my feeling of security--I don't feel comfortable on a rough surface on the hoods because the layers are sliding around against each other. I have no experience in these gloves with rain, but even wet sticky snow isn't a problem, the hands stay dry.

    I use these gloves for everyday riding below freezing. I'd recommend them for stop&go traffic or taking care of things in the city when the body isn't generating a lot of its own heat, especially if you have a bike with a flat bar. Because of the generous cut they're easy to get on and off, and they'll keep your hands warm if you find yourself standing around waiting for someone or pushing your bike. Yesterday I was feeling chilly and used them for the first time on a 60k round in -2c, (the suggested temperature) on the cyclocross bike around Grünewald/Wannsee/Potsdam. For this purpose, I found them both too warm (sweaty hands are cold hands!) and too bulky/slippery, so I don't think they're a good choice for sporty riding in your temperature range, but I'm really happy to have them for slow riding when it's really cold, as they certainly softer and more flexible that ski gloves I've tried.

    As I said I'll add some pictures so you can see the differences between the gloves better, but I hope this post helps. I'm new to the forum and have really enjoyed reading about everyone's experiences!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,466
    I have some nice silk liners, but not wool. Always meant to buy some. I think wind will be the biggest problem. I remember there was a pair of Ibex gloves I liked the looks of a couple of years ago. I'm going to have to think about this. I'd like warmth without bulk.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    17
    Hi Muirenn,

    I wrote a really extensive reply discussing two pairs of gloves, but it seems to be lost. I've contacted an admin, but I won't have time to rewrite it until tomorrow.

    I think the pearl izumi cyclone gel would be a good fit for your needs. Hopefully the admin will find my lost post though and you will be able to decide for yourself!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,466
    I hate it when that happens! Thanks, I'll look into them.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    17
    Hi Muirenn!

    I can tell you about two pairs of gloves I own, both from PI, the "cyclone gel" and the "soft shell elite."

    Tomorrow I can take some pictures so you can get a better idea of the material and fit of each, in case you can't get to a store.

    I grew up in Georgia but live now in northern Germany, so winter means something completely different now than it did when I was a kid! I think the cyclone gel is a very good fit for your described needs--blocking the wind in temperatures that rarely but sometimes dip below freezing--but since it also depends on the kind of riding you're doing here are some more details:

    The Cyclone Gel is a close fitting wind proof softshell with a suggested temperature range of 44-55F on the packaging. There is no separate insulating layer, only a thin microfleece lining the back of the hand and fingers, and an even thinner synthetic fabric under the gel inserts (2,5mm) on the palm. Their primary function is blocking wind and resisting water so the hands can retain their own heat. They don't feel "toasty" when I put them on, but thin and grippy. The reflective branding and high-visibility neon yellow panels which make it impossible for cars to overlook my signaling (and easy for others to spot me between the trees on single tracks). The glove extends 1,5cm past my wrist, where there is a small Velcro closure, so it's easy to regulate temperature by pushing sleeves up or down. Dexterity is excellent. In addition to braking and shifting, aided by sticky finger tips on the index and middle fingers and a grippy synthetic suede on the palms, I can use a smartphone, open a snack, and remove the tires and find the puncture (but not patch it) without taking them off. The nose wipe panel is generous and on both thumbs, (in case you're left-handed) and is also useful for demisting the glasses in rainy conditions. I wash them regularly and they dry overnight. I can recommend them for a light steady rain, my hands may be clammy, but not cold, as the gloves still hold off the wind. In a surprise driving rain, my hands are soaked after about 20m--nothing to do for the situation except look for a cafe! I don't have any experience using them in steady heavy rain; I use sealskinz for that.

    These are my go-to gloves when I need gloves, but I don't want to feel like I'm wearing gloves. I use them well below the temperature rating for the road/cyclocross bikes, since I'm usually generating enough heat as long as I can keep the wind off. They're small enough to keep in a jersey pocket when the days start getting shorter--sometimes I use them just to be seen better. I think the temperature rating might be accurate for standing around, but as long as I'm moving I can use them down to freezing. (And I think most people on the bike are moving?? Ok maybe they're a bit cool for an e-bike...)

    The softshell elite consists of a generously cut wind proof soft shell covering a layer of primaloft one insulation and a soft fleecy liner with a suggested temperature range of 25-35F. Like most primaloft products they feel warm and cozy when I put them on indoors, "toasty" is a good word! They have reflective branding similar to the cyclone gel, and are available with high visibility panels, although I ordered a more subtle black/grey. The gel inserts seem marginally thicker, but it's difficult the measure due to the insulation layer and the softer synthetic suede on the palms. This glove extends 7cm past my wrist and has a more substantial velcro closure--no cold air seepage here. They're bulkier than the cyclone gel though, and I have to take them off to use a smart phone (no electricity transfer), operate a zipper, or unfold the multi tool. They have the same tackiness on the index and middle finger as the cyclone gel, so I can shift and brake from the drops confidently. On the hoods I can feel the multiple layers sliding against each other though, so I don't feel comfortable there over rough terrain. They're certainly softer and more flexible than ski gloves I've tried, but they're still beefy gloves. They of course have a nose wipe panel, which can also be used to defog glasses from the inside, if your thumb fits... Obviously I don't have any experience with these gloves in rain, but they have no trouble with even a wet mushy snow; my hands stay dry.

    I use these gloves for every day riding when it's below freezing. They're fine for slower riding, especially with a flat bar or the mustache bars I have on the mixte. They're easy to take on and off, ideal for running errands or stop&go traffic when the body doesn't have time to heat itself. They'll keep your hands warm even if you have to stand around waiting for someone or push your bike home, and with the generous fit here's even room for a liner glove. On Saturday I was feeling chilly before going out in the -2C light fog and used them for the first time for a 60km round Grünewald/Wannsee/Potsdam on the cyclocross bike. I found them too warm for this purpose, even though this was the middle of the suggested temperature rating--sweaty hands become cold hands! Combined with the significantly reduced grip, I wouldn't recommend these gloves for sportier riding.

    I hope that helps. I'm new to the community and this is one of my first posts--I've really enjoyed reading about everyone's experiences!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
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    4,713
    I have PI Cyclones that are good down to those temperatures, at least on my hands, and probably further if my core is toasty.
    At least I don't leave slime trails.
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  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
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    I just bought the PI Cyclone gloves, tried them for two rides with temps in the low-mid 40s, and my fingers were so cold they hurt. There's no extra room inside them for a glove liner, and in fact the seams are big, especially inside the index fingers, which makes them even more snug.

    I already have windproof unlined gloves, so I really don't know what I will do with these. I wanted one pair of gloves that would keep me warm, instead of the two pairs I wear now (windproof unlined gloves plus wool liner gloves). The two pairs together have worked to keep me warm, but it's kind of a pain when you have to take them off and put them back on, especially with the very short rest stops that my friends take during the winter.

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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    For commuting on my flat-bar bike, I use a medium-thickness wool mitten inside a medium-thickness insulated mitten shell. That keeps my hands warm to about 30 degrees. Below that I need to pull my fingers to my palm inside the mittens and warm then intermittently as I ride. On my road bike, I've tried lobster mitts, but either they are not warm enough or too stiff. And most lobster mitts seems to be lobster shells over gloves, so your fingers can't warm each other and you can't pull fingers to palm. A poor design, in my opinion. It is possible to use mittens on a road bike if the mittens are wide and let you spread your fingers.
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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    Concord, MA
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    NY, I still find my combo of wool liners and light weight full fingered gloves are the best solution for me in terms of warmth and dexterity. I add a chemical hand warmer when it's really cold. I have gloves I like between 35 and 45, although at first my fingertips are cool. I cannot wear my PI Amphibs. Too constricting.
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  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankin View Post
    NY, I still find my combo of wool liners and light weight full fingered gloves are the best solution for me in terms of warmth and dexterity. I add a chemical hand warmer when it's really cold. I have gloves I like between 35 and 45, although at first my fingertips are cool. I cannot wear my PI Amphibs. Too constricting.
    When I stopped and changed from the PI Cyclone gloves to the wool liners+windproof gloves combo, the pain in my fingers went away instantly. It was actually pretty amazing.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

 

 

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