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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Twin Cities, Minnesota
    Posts
    487

    How many calories do you need to replace on a long ride?

    I wound up riding 60 miles on my ride last week. As per usual the ride was longer than I had planned because I got lost four times. Just so you all know . . . I have maps, it's just that I can never find the turnoffs I am supposed to take. One of the times I got lost was because the trail was under water. If there were detour signs I didn't see them so I guessed where to go and headed out in the general direction.

    I need to lose about 15 pounds. If I burned 2300 calories on that ride, how many calories do I need to replace?

    I know I need to stop and replenish myself. How many miles into the ride should I do that? How much should I eat? How many calories should I eat? Below is what I brought along to eat:
    - I made a snack bag of almonds, raisins, pecans, and sunflower seeds.
    - an orange, an apple and a banana. The banana was a gift from a another cyclists who told me that I looked like I needed it.
    - An egg salad sandwich
    - And of course, I had to stop and have a dish of Sebastian's famous ice cream -- which I should not have done, but after getting lost four times. I deserved a treat!

    I know I need to do something because after I finished all my food I was bonked and barely made the last 9 miles home.

    I drink a lot of liquid when I ride. That's normal for me as I will drink around 10-12 cups of water a day when I an not riding just because I am thirsty. I haven't had any problems from drinking that much except for going to bathroom a lot.

    I cannot ride one handed so stopping and getting off the bike to eat/drink is an absolute must for me. I don't need any more broken bones or concussions.

    One would think I would know all this stuff by now. I wish I did!
    kajero
    2013 Trek FX 7.6 WSD
    2012 Specialized Ruby WSD
    2004 Schwinn (I think that is the year)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    4,389
    There is some debate, but it is thought that most people's digestive systems can only process about 150-300 calories per hour, so eating more than that when exercising will simply give you digestive woes.
    "Sharing the road means getting along, not getting ahead" - 1994 Washington State Driver's Guide

    visit my flickr stream http://flic.kr/ps/MMu5N

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    4,713
    Quote Originally Posted by kajero View Post
    I wound up riding 60 miles on my ride last week. As per usual the ride was longer than I had planned because I got lost four times. Just so you all know . . . I have maps, it's just that I can never find the turnoffs I am supposed to take. One of the times I got lost was because the trail was under water. If there were detour signs I didn't see them so I guessed where to go and headed out in the general direction.

    I need to lose about 15 pounds. If I burned 2300 calories on that ride, how many calories do I need to replace?

    I know I need to stop and replenish myself. How many miles into the ride should I do that? How much should I eat? How many calories should I eat? Below is what I brought along to eat:
    - I made a snack bag of almonds, raisins, pecans, and sunflower seeds.
    - an orange, an apple and a banana. The banana was a gift from a another cyclists who told me that I looked like I needed it.
    - An egg salad sandwich
    - And of course, I had to stop and have a dish of Sebastian's famous ice cream -- which I should not have done, but after getting lost four times. I deserved a treat!

    I know I need to do something because after I finished all my food I was bonked and barely made the last 9 miles home.

    I drink a lot of liquid when I ride. That's normal for me as I will drink around 10-12 cups of water a day when I an not riding just because I am thirsty. I haven't had any problems from drinking that much except for going to bathroom a lot.

    I cannot ride one handed so stopping and getting off the bike to eat/drink is an absolute must for me. I don't need any more broken bones or concussions.

    One would think I would know all this stuff by now. I wish I did!
    Don't feel too bad. Getting nutrition right is a real process of trial and error, and, I think, doubly so if you're trying to lose weight.

    A couple things jump out at me: That's a lot of food while you're riding. I'm like a Boy Scout and bring extra, but that's a lot. And some of it is pretty heavy, so I wonder if you felt terrible in part because you're diverting a lot of energy back into your digestive system while you're trying to get home. I once ate a grilled ham and cheese sandwich and got back on the bike about 10-15 minutes after finishing my lunch. Never again, I tell you. I was surprised I made it back without puking.

    That's also a lot of water. (I drink tons while I ride, especially now that I'm living in a desert, so no need to justify that!) You go through what you go through. Just make sure you're also replenishing electrolytes if you sweat a lot. (Nuun, Skratch, Clif's thing...heck, even Gatorade or Powerade, even though they really only contain sugar and sodium.)

    What do you eat before and after you ride? What you eat even the day before a long ride can play a part. A light dinner the night before followed by even a normal breakfast that morning can leave me feeling underfueled, no matter what I bring with me.

    Like I mentioned above, for me, what makes the biggest difference is what I eat before I ride. I need a mix of protein, fat and carbs, about half an hour to an hour before I head out the door, plus the time in the car. (Do not eat a salad (even with tuna) and go out riding with people who are much faster. It will end badly.) What I eat on the ride is largely gravy. Metaphorical gravy, of course. (I'm waiting for someone to make a gravy-flavored gel. Urgh.) I have a hard time eating anything more food-like than a Clif bar on rides, and even more so when it's hot, but... I do blocks, beans and bars. If I'm doing anything more than 40 miles, I like having somewhere to stop for lunch (and a rest-and-digest period) planned in, or having beef jerky with me.

    When and how often are pretty individual. I used the rail-trail system extensively, and on most of my rides, I figured out where to stop based on road crossings. (I can't ride one-handed either.) You could do it that way, or time-wise, say, and snack every half-hour.

    I'm a little concerned about the egg salad sandwich from a food safety standpoint, though!
    At least I don't leave slime trails.
    http://wholecog.wordpress.com/

    2009 Giant Avail 3 |Specialized Jett 143

    2013 Charge Filter Apex| Specialized Jett 143
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,100
    Everyone is different, but that does seem like a lot of food. I also carefully plan my pre-ride dinner and breakfast for long rides (above 40 miles). My breakfast always includes 2 eggs, fruit, and a whole wheat bagel, or a slice of toast. On rides, I eat Lara Bars and supplement with Shot Blocks. That's all. If my energy is lagging, a Shot Block really helps me on long rides. If there's a lunch stop, I find it hard to eat, so I choose carefully. If I bring a lunch. it's a whole wheat bagel with almond butter and sometimes jelly.
    I often am ravenous after a long ride. I eat a carb/protein snack within an hour, and then try to wait until dinner. I usually can't, so I do snack a bit more on salty and healthy carbs; cheese and crackers usually does it.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
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    2011 Guru Praemio
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    9,351
    You said you did 60 miles, but how long did it take? We did a 26 mile ride yesterday in just about two hours and all I had was about a half a bottle of Gu Brew and water, no solid food. If we had been planning a longer ride, I would have started eating at about the 90 minute mark. On a long ride I try to eat a little bit every 30 minutes. I have a Bento box by my handlebars with food just dumped into it, usually Jelly Bellies, that I can easily grab while riding. That sounds like a lot of food to me. That's about how much solid food I would eat while doing a 200K, which would take between 10 and 11 hours including a meal stop

    I think hours spent riding is just as important as the miles. On my mountain bike a four hour ride is only 24 miles or so, but I need the same amount of food as a 4 hour road ride.

    Veronica
    Discipline is remembering what you want.


    TandemHearts.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    4,389
    Hmmm just a thought - have you had your blood sugar checked recently? Increased thirst and urination can be signs that you are developing diabetes. That could also explain some of your intake vs energy problems - if your body isn't properly accessing what you are eating.
    "Sharing the road means getting along, not getting ahead" - 1994 Washington State Driver's Guide

    visit my flickr stream http://flic.kr/ps/MMu5N

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Twin Cities, Minnesota
    Posts
    487
    LOL . . . it took me a long time! I won't say how long. I only average 10-12 mph. Then getting lost is so frustrating that I tend to take a lot of looonnnnggg breaks!
    It's a really hilly, curvy ride and there are couple of hills I don't even bother to try to ride up. I will just get too tired for the rest of the ride. But I do love the ride. I ride out to my Dad's grave at Ft. Snelling. I am going to ride it one more time this summer on the anniversary of his passing. I know I won't get lost so it will be interesting if my time improves.

    Also, on a few of the trails there are quite a few stop signs. And believe me if you go through them it's very possible you can get a $150 ticket. The cops will ticket a clipped rider that doesn't put one foot on the ground to stop.

    BTW . . . I didn't do much better on the MS150. It took me nearly 6 hours to ride the 75 miles.

    We did ride the Dakota Trail one day which is almost completely flat. Even on a trail like that I only averaged 13 mph and it seems I was going so fast. Ugh.

    I have been thinking about going clip less, but right now I don't have an income and it seems really expensive to go that way. I am also very scare of another crash.

    Sometimes I think I am tired before I even start out. I don't seem to be able to get to sleep very well nor sleep through the night. I get up at 5:00 a.m. two or three days a week to take care of my grandson. I am done at 4:00 and get home around 4:30 and then it seems I can't fall asleep until almost midnight. . Believe me, at 63 years old, I get tired, but I love being with him.
    Last edited by kajero; 08-04-2014 at 06:14 AM.
    kajero
    2013 Trek FX 7.6 WSD
    2012 Specialized Ruby WSD
    2004 Schwinn (I think that is the year)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,825
    For eating and drinking, I highly recommend Nancy Clark's Sports Nutrition Guide Book. She covers it all in a fast-to-read format.

    http://www.nancyclarkrd.com/books/sportsnutrition.asp

    I generally aim for 200-300 calories per hour during a ride, with a bigger-than-usual breakfast and dinner before a long ride. Lately I find that a snack (130-calorie cereal bar) is helpful about 15 minutes before I start to ride. I drink 1 20-oz. bottle per hour, alternating between Gatorade and water. During the summer I include one or two packets of high-sodium gel (Power Gel) as part of my food during the ride. Many regular sports gels and chews, and some drinks like Gatorade, actually do not have very much sodium in them. I'm not able to tolerate much real food during a ride, just cereal bars (Nutri-Grain bars), crackers and occasionally a tomato sandwich. However real foods take longer to digest and get into your blood stream, wheareas the gels and chews take effect more quickly so I feel less hungry.
    Last edited by ny biker; 08-04-2014 at 06:57 AM.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Traveling Nomad
    Posts
    6,636
    Quote Originally Posted by Veronica View Post
    I think hours spent riding is just as important as the miles. On my mountain bike a four hour ride is only 24 miles or so, but I need the same amount of food as a 4 hour road ride.
    I was going to ask the same thing. If you're riding 10 mph and doing the ride in 6 hours, that's quite different from riding 15 mph and doing it in 4 hours, or 20 mph and doing it in 3 hours.

    I go by time only. I always try to eat my first snack at about 90 minutes in. My snacks are usually whole grain fig bars, homemade oatmeal bars DH makes, or store bought granola bars. After the first snack, I eat every hour. I usually consume one water bottle (20 oz) of Gatoraid and my Camelbak full of water (50 oz) during a 40-50 mile ride. If it's especially hot or we're going longer, I'll stop for an additional beverage (16-20 oz of something with sugar and caffeine, like Coke -- only time I drink soda). Once or twice a week, DH and I will stop for a treat while riding, maybe a DQ Blizzard (I get a small sized one) or a cinnamon roll or a couple of homemade cookies from a bakery. I should mention that I am at my ideal weight now and am maintaining it at doing this. If I were trying to lose, the treats would go bye-bye!

    I have never analyzed calories on a ride or anything like this, but it seems to work for me most of the time. The only time I've gotten into trouble lately was a HOT ride where I left the Camelbak behind so only had one 20 oz water bottle. I thought we'd be stopping for a drink along the way, but the route was so rural there were no opportunities. I felt like crap at the end of the ride and had to drink a LOT to re-hydrate after. That would not be a problem for you. If anything, you're overdoing it with the liquids just a bit.
    Emily

    2011 Jamis Dakar XC "Toto" - Selle Italia Ldy Gel Flow
    2007 Trek Pilot 5.0 WSD "Gloria" - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow
    2004 Bike Friday Petite Pocket Crusoe - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow

 

 

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