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Thread: New commuter

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    2

    New commuter

    I have a cheap used road bike I want to use to ride part way to work. The ride will be on fairly nice road in central Texas. So it will also be very hot. What type of packs would be best considering I will not be using pannier bags? I will be bringing a change of clothes and probably lunch. Is there any other commuter gear that would be helpful in this situation? I'm thinking *** savers as well

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    I would look into ways of fastening your gear to your bike. A pack will affect your back and posture, and possibly cause pain. Plus make things much hotter.

    They do make rear racks that attach to the seat post that don't touch the rest of the bike. I have one that accomodates 40 pounds. But if your road bike has braze-ons for a rear rack, I'd get a nice Wald rack and folding baskets, then secure my work items in those.

    Anything should be on the rear before moving to attach to the front of the bike, due to center of gravity and handling issues. Much safer to put on the rear.

    Also, if your bike does not have the eyelets in the rear to accomodate a rack, there are ways around that such as P-clamps, and a bike shop can install any racks to make them work more efficiently if the correct holes are not pre-existing on your bike.
    Last edited by Muirenn; 06-20-2014 at 10:23 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    I was thinking this rack:

    http://www.amazon.com/Wald-Rear-Bike.../dp/B001B1914I

    And these baskets:

    http://www.amazon.com/Bicycle-Rear-G...DM2FSSZSXDR8QJ

    That is the simple and practical option. There are many more ways of doing this, of course. The Wald website also has a lot of gizmos to go with.

    Revelate designs makes bags that attach directly to the bike without racks. Costs much more, but could be worth your while. This one attaches under the bike's top tube, and may be a nice work option, though it's more meant for touring.

    http://store.biketouringnews.com/ran...elate-designs/

    Really, though, panniers are a nice option, too. It seems I've seen threads on here that look into panniers that convert into backpacks to be carried away from the bike. Again, not cheap, but could be perfect for your needs. Hopefully someone will come along that can find those threads, it's been awhile since those discussions.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    32
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I commute daily and this is perfect for my change of clothes and lunch and some other small items. It has a weight limit of 11 pounds. Arkel rack and tailrider. best investment ever!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Central Missouri
    Posts
    626
    I have a rack, a basket, and a waterproof pannier and this proves most versatile on my cross bike. I have a bunch of braze-ons but even when I had another style rode bike, I used c-clamps to attach the rack to the frame for light loads. Right now, I can carry a ton of weight on my bike no problem. I have the Wald basket seen above and it works great for little loads. I also carry a bungie to use the top of the rack if necessary when grocery shopping.

    I know lots of people use backpacks or messenger bags and I have tried that but it never worked. In Missouri, for most of the months you can commute, it is too hot to have a black pack on your back. It also makes it hard for short people like me to see over my shoulder or to use a glasses mirror. Having a rack is awesome because I can attach basically anything to it and can easily bring my computer into work.
    ***graduate student and avid cyclist***

    Owned by:
    Le Monstre Vert - 2013 Surly Cross-check
    Willis, my chiX

    "Carl" - 2010 Kia Soul (when necessary!)

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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    41
    If I have to, I go with a pack over a messenger bag - just feels more secure to me. But as others have mentioned, it can affect your posture and cause back pain. I can also make you sweat like a pig. I commute into Boston, MA (5 miles each way), and even in cooler weather my day hike pack, which has ventilation channels built into the back panel, can soak my back.

    You can find some pretty inexpensive bike panniers on ebay. Add them to a cheaper rack or other support, and it may just run you less than a decent commuter bag or backpack.

 

 

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