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  1. #1
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    Sep 2008
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    Twin Cities, Minnesota
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    486

    Towards A Slower, Simpler, More Civilized Bicycle Culture

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    Sorry about the duplicate post. I guess that is what happens when you get side tracked.

    I will wear what I will wear. I'd rather NOT have my pants let catch in the chain.

    http://hushmagazine.ca/culture/towar...cycle-culture/
    Last edited by kajero; 10-09-2013 at 04:32 PM.
    kajero
    2013 Trek FX 7.6 WSD
    2012 Specialized Ruby WSD
    2004 Schwinn (I think that is the year)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Saskatoon, Sask.
    Posts
    334

    I wasn't aware that cycling was uncivilized, prior to this article being written slightly more than a year ago.
    Queen of the sea beasts

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    4,364
    Piffle - if I want to move slowly and dress stylishly, I walk....
    "Sharing the road means getting along, not getting ahead" - 1994 Washington State Driver's Guide

    visit my flickr stream http://flic.kr/ps/MMu5N

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    4,066
    The point this article, and most others of its kind, completely miss, is that the type of daily cycling journey isn't usually something you can just pick and choose.

    "Once you discover the simple comforts and pleasures of civil cycling you won't look back". I can wear all the jeans and skirts I want and ride an upright bike, it won't change the fact that I have almost 15 km to ride to work and I live somewhere it frequently rains and snows. To get there within a reaonable amount of time I need to ride reasonably fast, and that means an efficient bike, and ditto clothing.

    And no, if I'm riding down to the local library or grocery store about a km away I do not change into bike clothes first. Does anyone?

    It's sort of like sneering at people for taking a train to work, and suggesting they walk instead.
    Winter riding is much less about badassery and much more about bundle-uppery. - malkin

    1995 Kona Cinder Cone commuterFrankenbike/Selle Italia SLR Lady Gel Flow
    2008 white Nakamura Summit Custom mtb/Terry Falcon X
    2000 Schwinn Fastback Comp road bike/Specialized Jett

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    251
    “Cycle Chic and their content inspired me to give up aspirations to spend loads of money I didn’t have on cycling gear, and remember what I used to ride in as a child: my regular clothes.”

    I think people are pretty clued in to what gear is required for different rides. I don't see anyone in "full kit" riding to the grocery. And I'm sure nobody who is out on a training ride is going to ride in jeans. The article is just another example of brewing contention among a group of people who all have the same goal. Anyone who rides a bike should respect other cyclists and this article doesn't seem very respectful. I used to live in Munich, which is just about the MOST bike-friendly city in the world and it seemed that any type of cyclist was respected. They just let everyone be. I wish we would see more of that in N. America. I mean, seriously... "more civilized"???? What makes serious road cycling uncivilized?
    Last edited by velo; 10-10-2013 at 03:25 AM.
    The bicycle has done more for the emancipation of women than anything else in the world. ~ Susan B. Anthony

  6. #6
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    Sep 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
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    Quote Originally Posted by velo View Post
    [I] I don't see anyone in "full kit" riding to the grocery.
    On the other hand, I very often do turn up at my local grocery store in bike gear, because a) it's on my way home, and b) I'm not self-conscious about being seen in public wearing bike gear.

    I read the comments under the article, and pretty much everyone said the same thing as we're saying. Except the one who felt they were all being thin-skinned vehicular cyclists because the article wasn't attacking them. Oh yeah? Is it really that hard to promote "civilized", "graceful", "elegant" and "dignified" riding without calling everybody else "militant" "Gore-tex clad Superdads hunched (...) pedalling like maniacs with scowls on their faces" and "middle-class, middle-aged road warriors"?

    By all means, I'd be thrilled if people rode bikes more for short errands. But I don't give a rat's *** what they're wearing or how fast they're moving, as long as they behave themselves in traffic.

    eta: sorry about getting worked up about an old post. But the sentiment is still out there, and gets voiced every now and then.
    Winter riding is much less about badassery and much more about bundle-uppery. - malkin

    1995 Kona Cinder Cone commuterFrankenbike/Selle Italia SLR Lady Gel Flow
    2008 white Nakamura Summit Custom mtb/Terry Falcon X
    2000 Schwinn Fastback Comp road bike/Specialized Jett

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Mrs. KnottedYet
    Posts
    9,082

    Wink NSFW (some foul language) turn speakers down

    RIP Ralieghdon, for here he tells us about bike fashion as it should be:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EEkFr...ture=youtu.be:
    Fancy Schmancy Custom Road bike ~ Mondonico Futura Legero
    Found on side of the road bike ~ Motobecane Mixte
    Gravel bike ~ Salsa Vaya
    Favorite bike ~ Soma Buena Vista mixte
    N+1 bike ~ Brompton
    https://www.instagram.com/pugsley_adventuredog/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    2,545
    There is so much stupidity in this piece one hardly knows where to begin with the snark. The author attributes a lot of power to clothing and gear in general.

    "Not only does that protective gear imply that cycling is inherently dangerous and complicated (actively discouraging the average by-stander from giving it a try), it also leads to risk compensation, causing the wearer to ride faster and more recklessly than they otherwise would.

    In choosing style over speed, and elegance over exertion, you are a completely predictable vehicle on the road, travelling at a jogging pace, yielding to pedestrians and cars, and following all traffic laws."

    How is riding "faster and more recklessly" risk compensation?

    I usually chuckle at articles like this but this one deserves an award of some sort.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Twin Cities, Minnesota
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    486
    Quote Originally Posted by PamNY View Post
    There is so much stupidity in this piece one hardly knows where to begin with the snark. The author attributes a lot of power to clothing and gear in general.
    Exactly . . . that's why I had to post the link to this stupid piece of journalism. Uh . . . is IT journalism????
    kajero
    2013 Trek FX 7.6 WSD
    2012 Specialized Ruby WSD
    2004 Schwinn (I think that is the year)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Saskatoon, Sask.
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    334
    Only a person with no math skills whatsoever thinks that "travelling at jogging pace" is safer in traffic. The closer you come to the speed of the cars on the road, the more time they have to see you and react to you.
    Queen of the sea beasts

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
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    4,632
    Quote Originally Posted by PamNY View Post
    There is so much stupidity in this piece one hardly knows where to begin with the snark. The author attributes a lot of power to clothing and gear in general.

    "Not only does that protective gear imply that cycling is inherently dangerous and complicated (actively discouraging the average by-stander from giving it a try), it also leads to risk compensation, causing the wearer to ride faster and more recklessly than they otherwise would.

    In choosing style over speed, and elegance over exertion, you are a completely predictable vehicle on the road, travelling at a jogging pace, yielding to pedestrians and cars, and following all traffic laws."

    How is riding "faster and more recklessly" risk compensation?

    I usually chuckle at articles like this but this one deserves an award of some sort.
    Is now the time to point out that the people I see doing STUPID things in traffic are the ones wearing regular clothing? What the...?
    At least I don't leave slime trails.
    http://wholecog.wordpress.com/

    2009 Giant Avail 3 |Specialized Jett 143

    2013 Charge Filter Apex| Specialized Jett 143
    1996(?) Giant Iguana 630|Specialized Riva


    Saving for the next one...

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,394
    I only wish my spandex made me go faster...
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura
    2017 Specialized Ariel Sport

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    2,545
    There's finally a positive comment. Here's a portion of it:

    "... if, as a cyclist, you want to model behavior that captures the imagination of pedestrians and drivers around you, and thus influence them to consider cycling themselves, then you need to shed the chamois. If you're looking cute, wearing everyday work clothes, casually cycling an upright bike to the office, you are much more likely to subconsciously influence someone to consider cycling. When we're all sprinting around downtown in our spandex kits, it's much easier for "othering" to occur — pedestrians and drivers won't see themselves in you."

    So -- if I want to be a cycling advocate, I have to spend a jillion dollars on one of those heavy Dutch bikes and (this may be the hardest part) look "cute."

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Saskatoon, Sask.
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    334
    Quote Originally Posted by PamNY View Post
    ...
    So -- if I want to be a cycling advocate, I have to spend a jillion dollars on one of those heavy Dutch bikes and (this may be the hardest part) look "cute."
    Ha ha! Ever notice most of those cycle chic bloggers are under 35? I guess you aren't supposed to ride a bike unless you're young, chic and attractive. That counts me out!

    One thing I noticed a long time ago was that the most competitive people of all are those that call themselves non-competitive. These are the people who glare at you and mutter something about "show-offs" if you just happen to pass them while riding/running/skiing/pick your activity. Their egos are so fragile they absolutely can't stand to be shown up, even inadvertently. So they'll either stop doing the activity, or they'll do it in a "non-competitive" way and loudly denounce anyone who "takes it too seriously". Because of course, they've re-invented the activity and theirs is the only proper way to do it. I'm guessing that a lot of the militantly anti-lycra dutch bike crowd fit into this category.
    Queen of the sea beasts

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    4,364
    oh yeah.... some of the most "competitive commuters" - you know the ones, if you pass them they've got to suddenly speed way up and do something idiotic to get back in front of you.... I come across are the retro-grouch set.... other racers are generally doing their own thing and don't give a darn about whether or not you pass them or they pass you.
    "Sharing the road means getting along, not getting ahead" - 1994 Washington State Driver's Guide

    visit my flickr stream http://flic.kr/ps/MMu5N

 

 

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