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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Twin Cities, Minnesota
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    486

    Stupid Kids . . . I know they stole our bikes but . . .

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    Stupid Kids.
    they stole our bikes.
    The bikes are worth at least 5,000 so they can be charged with a felony.
    I am sure they didn't know the value of what they stole. They just thought it would be fun to ride some really nice bikes.
    Yes, I know they stole them, but I hate to see a felony go on their records. I guess they should have stolen something cheaper.
    OK I am a sap. I hope it can be reduced to a misdemeanor.
    It would never occur to me to steal someone's bike no matter how accessible it was. In fact, I saw an unlocked bike outside a dollar store a few days ago. I was very concerned about it not being locked up, but i didn't take it! So I am having a rough time figuring out how I even feel about the situation now. Is a felony an overkill

    Of course, I may feel different once the bikes are released. We have to bring receipts and proof of ownership but went out of town before would could do that. If the bikes are damaged well . . . .
    The police say the bikes look great and that everyone in the precinct is drooling over them, so I assume nothing has happened to them.
    kajero
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
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    13,394
    You are over thinking this.
    They stole your bikes; it's a felony. Enough said.
    It doesn't matter how much they were worth. Stealing is wrong.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
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    4,632
    Quote Originally Posted by Crankin View Post
    You are over thinking this.
    They stole your bikes; it's a felony. Enough said.
    It doesn't matter how much they were worth. Stealing is wrong.
    Agreed. It doesn't matter how much the bikes were worth, how much they thought they were worth, or what they were planning to do with them. They chose to commit a crime. They should face the consequences.
    At least I don't leave slime trails.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
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    14,501
    Take some time to think about it, and if you still feel the same way, let the prosecutor know.

    Understand that it's a structural problem why the state considers the crime these people committed more serious than if they'd punched you in the face and knocked out a few teeth, or if they'd hit you with a car while you were riding and both killed you and destroyed your bike.

    Those decisions, about what our penal system considers serious, aren't personal to you. But if you refuse to participate in that system, let the prosecutor know. They may or may not take your feelings into account and offer a misdemeanor plea, but in a case like this, they likely will.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Saskatoon, Sask.
    Posts
    334
    Just how old are they? I bet they did know they were stealing something expensive. They can walk into a bike store and look at prices the same as anyone else.
    Queen of the sea beasts

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,889
    There is also another perspective that says if they wind up getting off on a misdemeanor, then they may not learn anything from the experience. Of course that depends on the individuals, but they likely knew exactly what they were stealing - and if I remember your OP properly this was not a crime of opportunity. I've been reading that bike thieves have/are becoming more selective in what they steal.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Taylor, MI
    Posts
    220
    You need to do what you think is best for you and your DH. However, you need to keep in mind how devastated you were when you discovered the bikes missing, how you felt sort of violated. That needs to be considered as well as the actual value of the bikes. Will the punishment actually serve to teach the thieves a lesson so they will never do that again? We seem to have evolved into a society that some people think that it's OK to take something from someone else because they figure they won't get caught or will get a light sentence. We as victims need to support the justice system to implement punishment that will truly deter these 'boys' from future criminal endeavors. I don't know exactly what that should be, but supporting a lesser charge may not be the answer. YMMV

    Glad you are getting the bikes back,
    P2
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
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    6,984
    Let the charge be on the record. The kids have to learn. They also trespassd on your property to get at the bikes.
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    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know what’s in a person’s heart.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    the dry side
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    4,367

    Stupid Kids . . . I know they stole our bikes but . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by shootingstar View Post
    Let the charge be on the record. The kids have to learn. They also trespassd on your property to get at the bikes.
    I totally agree with this. Most bike thieves are not opportunists, but part of a something bigger and well on the way to becoming career criminals. Nowis not the time to go all " oh those poor kids might have to go jail now" on them.
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  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    california
    Posts
    1,226
    Since you don't say how old they are or if they have past criminal records I'll add that forgiveness is my way of not letting a negative feeling control my actions. For sure they need to take responsibility for their actions as we all do. If they are young then for me that responsibility could be like Muirenn's idea about community service and also probation rather than having a felony on their record which has some serious complications on their lives.

    In any case do what YOU feel is right regarding talking to the police/prosecutors about your thoughts!!! I've had a couple of cheap personally built up city bikes stolen. My first thought was I hoped the thief would take care of the bike and appreciated the work I put into it ....then I just let the situation turn into my building up another cheap city bike and moving forward.

    Glad you got your bikes back!!!!!!!!
    ‘The negative feelings we all have can be addictive…just as the positive…it’s up to
    us to decide which ones we want to choose and feed”… Pema Chodron

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catrin View Post
    There is also another perspective that says if they wind up getting off on a misdemeanor, then they may not learn anything from the experience.
    The other half of it though, is that while a felony conviction will have way more long term consequences, they're also way more likely to serve jail time for a misdemeanor. That's assuming this is their first conviction.

    Processing felons is such an expensive proposition that most first-time non-violent offenders get probation. But they'll be saddled with such a stigma, probably won't be able to get a job, can't vote until they're off paper (or in some states, for the rest of their lives), may be kicked out of their residence, etc., etc., that the only thing they're likely to "learn" is (greater) contempt for authority. Someone convicted of misdemeanor theft is likely to serve a short time in the county lockup, usually with more suspended on condition they stay out of trouble ... more likely to be a learning experience IMO.



    I don't think the OP was talking about "forgiveness" or letting anyone walk. Her hesitation has to do with a felony charge for a property crime, which is a sentiment I share (provided these people aren't career thieves).
    Last edited by OakLeaf; 08-24-2013 at 08:17 AM.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
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    13,394
    I generally like the idea of community service, but I don't think it should be the only thing used as a consequence in this case. And while I agree with Oak that things like killing someone on a bike with a car needs to be a felony, the sad truth is, in most of the juvenile cases I've dealt with, there are too many "chances" given, and then we are on a third or fourth offense, for which there have been very little meaningful consequences. And, we don't get the kids and their families the other help they may need.
    Last edited by Crankin; 08-24-2013 at 10:49 AM.
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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Central Indiana
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    6,043
    Much may depend on whether these kids are prosecuted as adults. Almost all states have "transfer" statutes whereby teens are tried as adults. It typically depends on the crime and the offender's age and past record. Some states allow for prosecutorial and/or judicial discretion, while others made it mandatory for cretain crimes. If they aren't tried as adults, then the state's juvenile justice procedure may provide additional privacy protection and fewer permanent ramifications. That's not to say there won't be serious consequences, but they'll be less severe than a felony conviction as an adult.
    Live with intention. Walk to the edge. Listen hard. Practice wellness. Play with abandon. Laugh. Choose with no regret. Continue to learn. Appreciate your friends. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is.

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  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    130
    You all have a great deal of faith in the the idea that there will be any consequences? I doubt there will be any at all. You think they are going to be tried? And it be a felony? How many minor petty thefts even get to court?

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
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    14,501
    Pretty much all of them where the perps are caught (if by "get to court" you mean a complaint and a judicial resolution, not just cases where one party is obstinate enough to waste everyone's time on a trial).

    Anyway, where this thread started is they're being charged with grand theft. You're right, there's not a lot of investigative resources put into petit thefts. But these perps have already been caught and, per the OP, charged.

    Friend of mine did a couple of days for shoplifting a 59 cent cookie from 7-11.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

 

 

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