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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    Pacific Northwest
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    534

    RSVP? Any ride reports?

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    I'd love to read about how the ride went, seems like the weather was just about perfect. No rain, and not too hot.

    My DH said the only glitch was an hour and a half wait to get into Canada on Friday.

    Congrats to those who completed the ride!
    "Don't go too fast, but I go pretty far"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    315
    We did the RSVP 1 and left UW around 7 am. Weather was really humid in the morning so I was really having trouble keeping my glasses from fogging up, but the temp was very comfortable. Had a fantastic ride, it seems like we had tailwinds the whole way so pedaling felt effortless. I was really happy to see the lemon aid stand was still on top of Chuckanut drive. The kids who set up the stand have been doing it for 16 years and the oldest girl was getting married. It was fun to see how much they have grown up since we first did the RSVP 10 years ago. DH and I rolled into Bellingham around 2:00pm and our two riding buddies rolled in shortly after. We cleaned up and went for beers and nachos on the main drag and cheered the rest of the riders on as they came in.

    Day two started early as DH wanted to get to border before the crowds came. Even leaving Bellingham at 6:45 and hooking up with some really fast pacelines, we still encountered over an hour wait at the border. We were in line with one of the Cascade ride leaders and he said the back up was due to the border patrol trying to match the riders on the manifesto that cascade provided with our bib numbers and passports. The last two times we have done this ride there was absolutely no wait at the border, so that was definitely a bummer and might be a deal breaker for doing the ride again.

    The ride into Vancouver is my absolute favorite part of this ride. Seeing the city as you are rolling along nearly car free residential streets is awesome. We pulled into the finish around 1:20pm and enjoyed some burgers and beers at the after party (beers were $8 a piece, so we didn't stay too long). After the party we headed to our hotel to meet up with our riding buddies wives who had driven up to meet us and got cleaned up so we could go explore the town....and that's when we encountered our first ZOMBIE! Apparently they had a Zombie walk scheduled for that day, so the streets were overflowing with every kind of zombie you could think of....zombie babies, zombie dogs, zombie super woman, zombie doctors........It was awesome! I really wish my kids could have seen it. We took some video and I got my pix taken with one zombie who was very sticky (from all his fake blood). It was quite the event.

    After the Zombie encounter, we were on a mission to find a bar that would turn on the Seahawks game for us (apparently all the sports bars were playing either soccer or canadian football.) Finally found one and were able to watch the game and get some dinner. All in all it was a fantastic ride. The tailwinds, company, beers and zombies were great....the border just sucked!

    Hope everyone else had a great ride!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    pacific NW
    Posts
    1,038
    We rode the new tandem, which, although we've had it for a year, we haven't ridden much due to a long series of irritating health issues on my part. We discovered that training separately (and sometimes sporadically for the "weakest link") makes for an exhausting weekend of riding. Oh well, next year will be a breeze. If you saw a big blue Rodriguez tandem with a very fat lady on the back, that was us.

    We started out around 6:30 and all was spiffy until we hit that first climb in Woodinville. The differences in our riding styles were magnified and made for an uncomfortable struggle up that hill. I did not miss the course change that eliminated the rollers going into arlington and that long run on the Centennial trail was nicely restorative. There was a drunk woman at the Mini stop in Arlington, who was having a very loud, very animated monologue which assured we did not linger too long. The second climb into Mt Vernon was even worse than I remembered and I felt like I was running on fumes as we made it to the lunch stop there. Chukanut Dr was a painful blur and the lemonade was most gratefully received. We didn't roll into Bellingham until after 4:00. After a quick shower, we stumbled down the hill and had a really good Mexican meal. We collapsed in our dorm room and it was lights out soon after.

    Day two started out pleasantly enough and we were just zooming along with high hopes until we hit the back up at the border. Standing in line for over an hour just did wonders for my back and numb leg, not to mention my mood. Like TTaylor said, it's potentially a deal breaker for future rides.

    Having spent a lot of that waiting time psyching ourselves up to face "The Wall" (we'd actually decided we would just bail and walk it from the get go) we were delighted to discover that it had been one of the things eliminated with all the new course changes. We happily zoomed along until we hit Coquitlam and Port Moody and nearly every red light we came across. It was actually like that the rest of the way and we spent a lot of time grumbling and cursing and generally being crabby. We didn't roll in to the down town area until after 4, and found the Zombie Parade to be rather irritating, since we were forced to dismount and walk the bike a couple of different times, just to get through intersections. We parked the bike, took our patches, gulped our free beer and limped back to the Blue Horizon. We were too zonked to do much beyond eating dinner. I always do enjoy those panoramic views of the city from the rooms at the Blue Horizon, though. Had the best seafood Bennie in the world in the morning before heading back home feeling privileged to live in such an orderly and civilized place where such an adventure could take place. Something about pushing through all the resistance and pain and making it to the finish (in spite of turning into a snarling dog) makes me feel so happy and peaceful afterwards.

    Rodriguez Adventure
    Bacchetta Bellandare
    HPV Gekko fx
    Custom Rodriguez Tandem
    2009 Specialized Tricross
    2012 Trek Mamba

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    pacific NW
    Posts
    1,038
    Still wouldn't willingly sit on a bicycle saddle without some significant threat or incentive, though. Even a week later!

    Rodriguez Adventure
    Bacchetta Bellandare
    HPV Gekko fx
    Custom Rodriguez Tandem
    2009 Specialized Tricross
    2012 Trek Mamba

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    534
    ttaylor and lauraelmore, glad to see you survived the zombie invasion. I really enjoyed reading your ride reports. You must have been in Arlington the same time as my DH, he told me about that crazy loud woman, although he thought she may have just been mentally ill, not drunk, just spewing awfulness at everyone, yikes.

    I was happy to hear there were still zombies on the route, we encountered those last year, but fortunately they weren't in our way. So funny you got a picture with them ttaylor!

    I'm really curious as to what the real issue at the border was, as last year they also checked our numbers against their list of riders and it didn't take more than 20-30 minutes tops. Very strange and aggravating.

    I'm thinking it's not fair that the weather was perfect AND they rerouted some of the hilly sections out (THE WALL) the year I'm not doing that ride. I do remember what a shock that first big bad hill in Woodinville was though, after that nice easy-breezy section on the Burke, ha ha. Lauraelmore, I'm glad after all you've been through this year and after STP you were able to complete this ride, good on you!! Congrats to both you ladies.
    "Don't go too fast, but I go pretty far"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Pac. NW
    Posts
    350
    Well, I guess it's my turn now! The five of us had a great ride. One week later though, and I'm sitting here on a very sore, raw bum! Can't wait for that to heal.

    Somehow, we didn't leave the UW until 7:00. We had a great day, but didn't get to our room on the Guide Meridian until 6:00! We still can't figure out how we took eleven hrs.!!!! Averaged 14 mph. We hit every stop, but I didn't think we lingered. We had one flat to repair and luckily that was at a turf farm, nice soft grass to sit in. Needed that rest for the upcoming Chuckanut Hill. We were slow on hills for sure. We waited a few times for the our sore knee rider.

    Loved the day one route. Well, didn't love the hills at the time, but did just fine on them. Mostly light traffic. These were the longest hills I've ever ridden, but not the steepest. Had a couple of nice compliments on the hill north of Arlington. One from my son who said: "Mom, you're really getting better at hills", the second from a gentleman who said: "Now I'm being passed by a midget!" (At least he didn't call me an old midget!).

    Chuckanut was the highlight. We stopped for a photo op. Since we were so late in the day, we got to enjoy the late afternoon sun shining on the Sound. On a sunny day, there isn't anything much more beautiful than the Puget Sound and the islands. The best lemonade in the world and what a friendly group.

    I must confess, since we were running so late, we cheated! We took a shortcut from Fairhaven to downtown and saved 3 miles. Then we swung by our apartment of 35 years ago (college days). We also took a short-cut to the hotel and saved a tad more.

    After quick showers, we crawled next door to the Mexican restaurant and wondered how we would ever be able to find the strength to ride the next day! Dinner was followed by a soak in the hot tub, with interesting conversation from fellow RSVPers.

    We were on the road late again, at 6:20! (DH was doing his best to remember, this was for the fun!) We cheated again! We went straight out of our hotel up the Guide Meridian to the border. When we arrived, there was one man in front of our group! We waited 35 min. for the border to open and were whisked right through.

    Loved the the country-side riding of the first half on day two. None of us loved the urban riding of Vancouver (except the views from the bridges). I was cut off by a rider on a tight turn in a intersection and was barely able to avoid a near miss. That in conjunction with being a bit tired, seemed to zap my confidence for the remainder of the ride in all that traffic. I loved seeing downtown in the distance. I was missed the zombies when my fellow rider pointed them out! Darn.

    We arrived around 1:30 or 2:00 and had a quick burger, picked up badges and ordered our t-shirts (arrived yesterday!). A burger never tasted better! We then hailed a couple of taxi vans. Took our bikes and us to the train station where we boxed them up and rode the train to Everett where we had family waiting to pick us up. The train was wonderful. The Bistro was two cars back where you could order overpriced beer, wine and food. We had plenty of all of them and enjoyed lively conversation from fellow riders. So nice to get up and walk around, use the restroom and relax. The border crossing didn't take more than 5 minutes. (Guess you could say we really scored both ways on the border crossings).

    We did have one very scary moment, just north of the BG trail. We were riding single file, 6-10 of us. My DH was in the lead. A younger driver came along and suddenly hit the gas, squealed his tires and made a quick right turn right in from of him. Missed him by about 5 feet! No blinker, just a fast, unexpected turn. Since I'm not good with the middle finger, I may have given him a peace sign, but the people in back said we all flipped him off in unison! Very frightening! Not sure if he was spiteful or thought he had room and panicked. Either way, very inappropriate. I really wish we had thought to get his license plate number.

    As far as the chafed bum, its actually my upper legs, mostly in the back. More on the left then the right (leg length disprepency?) I actually rubbed the skin raw. Its now like a big blister that has popped.

    Putting my new PI shorts on, the sore spots match up to the seam of the chammy. I usually wear PIs one day and my LG shorts the second. The chammy is coming apart of the LGs and didn't want to risk a problem. Checking the seams, the LGs are much smoother. Guess I should have taken my chances with them. As the birthdays roll along, I have also noticed that my skin is getting more frail. Looking at old posts here, I think I'll be ordering some Laniseptic, per Susan O's recommendation. In the mean while, lots of ointments, gels, creams, antibiotics while I wait for it to heal!

    I must say, when I signed up for this ride, I really didn't know if I could manage the hills. I did just fine. Never once felt like I couldn't finish one. Yes, I was tired at the end of day one. Felt pretty darn good at the end of day two! I have been making a point of hitting the hills all season and have worked on my mental attitude. I've gone from I suck at hills, to I'm looking forward to (more or less) the challenge of getting up the hills. What a difference. I have learned not to panic and it has really help to keep my heart rate down.

    So, all and all a good ride. I'm proud of how well I did. We aren't sure that urban riding is for us. We think next year maybe we will look for a couple of centuries that are out in farm country and stay away from the big cities. But then again, who knows. The bug could bite again!
    2011 Specialized Ruby Comp
    2015 Giant Liv Tempt 3

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
    Posts
    6,984
    Interesting reading about this ride and people's impressions since I still consider myself a Vancouverite (I have a lot of personal stuff there at our 2nd home and bikes).

    With my partner we have cycled to Seattle and from Seattle in separate trips. My comments over the years:

    I loved the Chuckanut area. etc.

    The ride route took you over the Golden Ears Bridge from Maple Ridge, etc. .....I was on the construction engineering project for that bridge. There is a story behind that bridge: http://cyclewriteblog.wordpress.com/...ount-thy-ways/

    Your ride along the Adanac bike route is a heavily used bike route which if you weren't super tired, might have noticed there were large outdoor art murals including 2 different murals that have a cyclist in their designs. You would have cycled over some pavement mosaic art on memorialize long gone salt water creeks..

    Yea, sure Vancouver is not rural cycling in downtown, but your Vancouver city route shows off the local mountains and ocean water that surround the city....with no major highway running through downtown by the waterfront (unlike Seattle).

    If the route was designed instead to go onto Ontario St. ...I would suggest strong that the Cascade Bike Club..it's a nice quiet residential street which people could drop by Queen Elizabeth Park with a bike saddle sculpture, past a new community garden (Mount Pleasant) with bike wheel trellises, street takes you straight by Olympic Village bike route and around Science World geodesic dome.
    My Personal blog on cycling & other favourite passions.
    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know what’s in a person’s heart.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    pacific NW
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    1,038
    Shootingstar, I was thinking about you as we rode on the Barnett Highway. Didn't really like it any better, having the benefit of reading your perspective, but I did try to see it as you must. We LOVE Vancouver, and always resolve that next year, we will simply drive up to the city and have a leisurely, enjoyable visit instead of doing RSVP and having to rush home the next day. Not sure what happens to that plan every year...

    Rodriguez Adventure
    Bacchetta Bellandare
    HPV Gekko fx
    Custom Rodriguez Tandem
    2009 Specialized Tricross
    2012 Trek Mamba

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Pac. NW
    Posts
    350
    Shootingstar, Please don't think I was be critical of your Vancouver. It is a beautiful city and I have many wonderful memories of trips there from our early days of marriage, living in B'ham. I do think our little group learned a little something about our riding style though. We all agreed we like quiet, country roads over urban riding. We also didn't care for day two of the STP, riding along the highway in Oregon. Didn't much care for riding through the Rose Qrtr. either.

    And, I'm truly sorry that I was so tired that I missed all the great details of the bike trail. Didn't notice a one! Darn. I will say, I was really flying up the Barnett Hwy. for a while. We had just refueled at a great mini-stop at a LBS. What a friendly place! Our favorite stop and they only served water! And what did they put in their water? I was flying! Then all the sudden, I ran out of gas and went back to my usual slow pace! The views of the city were great from the hwy, but again, not our favorite place to ride.

    I am bummed we weren't able to stay in the city and take in the sights. Of course that was our plan when we signed up last Jan.! Some day, hopefully!
    2011 Specialized Ruby Comp
    2015 Giant Liv Tempt 3

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    534
    What great reports on the RSVP, I felt like was riding along too. Smittykitty and Lauraelmore, I hope your saddle sores heal up soon, ouchie!! Smitty, you SHOULD be proud. Last year we got to Bellingham that first day after 6:00 pm, but we didn't average no 14 mph!

    I really loved Vancouver too, the sights and smells going through Chinatown. I'd love to spend more time riding there someday. But I have to admit that I was intimidated by the bustle of downtown. I was so glad my DH had been there before and more or less knew the way to the hotel, I would have been in deep water trying to read the directions and maneuver through that traffic. One of my favorite moments though was riding over the Golden Ears bridge and I was really interested to read your account Shootingstar, that was quite interesting. How wonderful to be a part of that! And your route suggestion sounds much more enjoyable.

    I was gobsmacked at how many cyclists there were just in the few miles we rode through, going about their everyday business, what a different world!

    Again, really enjoyed reading about your journeys...
    "Don't go too fast, but I go pretty far"

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    66
    My husband (Auđunn) and I did the RSVP1. It was my first time and his second, but he’s a Seattle Randonneur, so this ride was nothing compared to the 200K, 300K, 400K, and 600K rides he does regularly. I had decided to do RSVP after Auđunn finished last year and raved about the ride. I only started cycling in February 2012, but I’ve slowly been increasing my miles, so I’d be strong enough to do the ride this summer.

    Day 1

    On Friday morning we didn’t get to UW until about 6:15am. We missed the big rollout at 6, so the Burke-Gilman wasn’t too crowded when we started around 6:20.


    At the UW Montlake Parking Lot before starting the Ride

    It was cool enough to require arm warmers and a vest at the start, but we warmed up quickly enough, especially once we got to the hills in Woodinville. Once we’d passed the hills it was nice to ride through the farmlands around Snohomish and finally get on the Centennial Trail. We bumped into friends, Jim and Jeff, at the first food stop at Machias Station. Of course, they’re my husband’s ride buddies and much stronger riders like him; they typically complete the STP in about 12-12.5 hours with stops. Auđunn explained that we wanted to go at a leisurely pace, so to them that meant averaging 16-18 mph on the Centennial Trail until we got to Arlington, where we had to stop at Moe’s Espresso Stand for smoothies.


    Moe’s Espresso Stand in Arlington: The guys stop there for smoothies each year they do the RSVP.

    Afterwards, we told the guys to go ahead, and we took our sweet time, especially going up Finn Settlement/Lake Cavanaugh Rd. I actually think that climb was harder than the climb in Woodinville, maybe because it was getting hotter, and I don’t do too well in the heat. Fortunately, there were a lot of trees, so it was mostly shaded. The route was nice and flat around Mt. Vernon, but we had to take a detour through Burlington since West Whitmarsh Road was closed. It was getting really hot out in the open at the start of the Chuckanut, so it was nice to finally get into the trees and shade and get peeks of Samish Bay and Bellingham Bay, even if it meant climbing a few hills.

    I was actually dreading the Chuckanut, but it wasn’t too bad. There were a few rollers, so we could pick up speed on the descents to get halfway up the next hill, and there’s a beautiful lookout near Larrabee State Park.


    Auđunn and me at the Bellingham Bay Viewpoint near Larrabee State Park along Chuckanut Drive

    Still, it was definitely challenging climbing hills after 100 miles of riding, and I almost wept with relief when we got to the RSVP Lemonade Stand at the end of the Chuckanut. I don’t know if I was delirious, but I swear that’s the best ice-cold lemonade I’ve ever tasted!


    Ice-cold lemonade at the RSVP Lemonade Stand at 100.7 miles at the end of the Chuckanut

    We got lost trying to find our hotel in Bellingham and ended up taking the scenic route. We finally got to the hotel around 5:30pm, took long, hot showers, then went to meet our friends at the Boundary Bay Brewery. We stayed a few hours then went back to our hotel to crash.

    Day 1 Total Distance: 109.6 miles
    Day 1 Total Time: 11 hours and 15 minutes
    Day 1 Moving Time: 8 hours and 17 minutes
    Day 1 Average speed: 13.2 mph


    Day 2

    On Day 2 we got up at 5:45am, checked out of the hotel, rode to the Best Western Heritage Inn with our drop bags, then rode to the IHOP for a hearty breakfast. At the IHOP we bumped into Jake, a Cascade Bike Club ride leader, with about a dozen riders. We left just before them around 7:15, but they quickly overtook us before we started the 12+ miles of rough chipseal roads between Bellingham and Lynden. Since it felt like my fillings were about to fall out, I was praying for smooth roads even if it meant climbing some hills. Thankfully, the roads got smoother a few miles before Lynden where we bumped into Jim and Jeff at the Lynden Mini food stop. Afterwards, the four of us rode up to the Canadian Border, where we had to wait an hour to cross the border.


    On Day 2 there was an hour-long wait for cyclists at the US-Canadian Border.

    Everyone who had done the ride last year was irritated by the ridiculous line since it had only taken 10-15 minutes to cross the year before. We saw a Cascade Bike Club support car pull into the parking lot about 30 minutes into our wait, and we heard rumors that there had been a problem with the original rider list that Cascade had given border agents.


    Jim, Auđunn, Jeff, and me at the Welcome to British Columbia sign just across the border

    After the wait, we took our requisite photo at the Welcome to British Columbia sign then headed north. The first 25 miles into Canada were nice and easy, through a lot of picturesque country roads and neighborhoods. The guys were joking that Jim should take a call on his cell while climbing “The Wall”, like he’d done during a previous RSVP while other riders were hyperventilating or walking their bikes up. We were surprised and a little disappointed that Cascade had removed “The Wall” from the route since we’d all been preparing for it.

    The next part of the ride was relatively easy until the Golden Ears Bridge. The spiral ramp up to the bridge was fun, but for me that bridge was probably the most nerve-wracking portion of the two-day ride. First, I’m always nervous about crossing huge bridges with loud, heavy car traffic, and it didn’t help that we had to climb for most of it. However, the worst part was having groups of cyclists passing me on such a narrow strip when there were oncoming cyclists, so I was trying not to panic while clusters of cyclists were passing and calling, “On your left!” then almost immediately, “Rider up!” Fortunately, the Pitt River Bridge was a lot shorter and not as steep.

    Our next stop was at Cap’s Westwood Cycle in Coquitlam, where the Skateboarder Guy almost passed us! He was amazing! He did the whole RSVP route on his skateboard and even got a round of applause when he got to the Coast Plaza Hotel reception area at the finish.


    The Skateboarder Guy did the entire RSVP route and got a round of applause when he got to the Coast Plaza Hotel reception area.

    My next least favorite section was along the Barnet Highway, where we had some climbing on a narrow bike lane beside really heavy high-speed car traffic. It was later in the day and starting to warm up, but fortunately, that stretch along the highway wasn’t too long. Next, we rode into Burnaby and the outskirts of Vancouver. There we encountered rollers where we could pick up enough speed on the descents to crest the next hill.

    Riding through downtown Vancouver was a little scary, especially with the heavy car traffic, tour buses, and pedestrians. There’s a really nice bike lane on Richards St. and cycle tracks along Dunsmuir St. and Hornby St., so I don’t know why the route went along W. Cordova St., which had a lot more car traffic and no dedicated lane for cyclists. After winding through downtown Vancouver, we made it to the finish at the Coast Plaza Hotel and joined our friends for drinks on the patio.

    When I sat down, our friends asked me how I felt and whether I’d do the ride next year. Of course, I just wanted to drink and dunk my body into ice-cold water then take a long hot bath and not even think about riding. For a beginner like me, a long ride like this is a lot like childbirth, definitely rewarding but still traumatic.


    Enjoying drinks at the Finish at the Coast Plaza Hotel

    Day 2 Total Distance: 83.3 miles
    Day 2 Total Time: 11 hours and 38 minutes
    Day 2 Moving Time: 6 hours and 16 minutes
    Day 2 Average speed: 13.3 mph

    Now, a few weeks later, I realize it wasn’t too bad. Right after the ride I had some right knee pain—probably due to tight hip flexors, and my legs were sore but not anymore than I would get with a really hard work-out. Luckily, no sore butt—I guess going through four kinds of saddles, finally finding the right shorts for long rides, and our trusty tube of Chamois Butt’r did the trick. It really helped that we’ve done enough long rides that we know what kind of food to bring and that Auđunn is slightly OCD about cleaning and maintaining our bikes, so we had no flats or mechanical problems. We also could not have gotten any luckier with the mostly cool weather and wind conditions.

    Would I do the ride next year? Definitely, but I really need to work on my hill climbing.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    534

    RSVP? Any ride reports?

    Well done MarieV, awesome ride report! Thanks for the great pictures too. You look like you are having a great time.

    Labor is an apt analogy for those epic rides. During and immediately after you think "never again "!!! But a few weeks later, it's more like , well I survived it, so maybe it wasn't that bad, ha.
    "Don't go too fast, but I go pretty far"

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
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    Great photos MarieV!

    Riding through downtown Vancouver was a little scary, especially with the heavy car traffic, tour buses, and pedestrians. There’s a really nice bike lane on Richards St. and cycle tracks along Dunsmuir St. and Hornby St., so I don’t know why the route went along W. Cordova St., which had a lot more car traffic and no dedicated lane for cyclists. After winding through downtown Vancouver, we made it to the finish at the Coast Plaza Hotel and joined our friends for drinks on the patio.
    If you came along the Adanac, you could gotten onto the Dunsmuir St. separated bike lane and there could have been some side streets to take people away from the main roads.

    I've only cycled the Barnett Highway northeast to Vancouver from Burnaby once. We cycle home from Golden Ears Bridge and hook into Pitt Meadows dikes path, eventually onto the Central Valley Greenway bike route (30 km.) from New Westminister into Vancouver.

    I cannot even begin to repeat myself that Cascades Club should really think of cycling on the Ontario St. bike route as I mentioned earlier in this thread into downtown..as another alternative.
    My Personal blog on cycling & other favourite passions.
    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know what’s in a person’s heart.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    66
    AppleTree, I actually felt great by the time I submitted my ride report. We had planned a week-long trip with friends to Coeur d'Alene and Glacier National Park in early September, so over Labor Day weekend I did a 109-mile ride with my husband on the Coeur d'Alene Trail. That was really beautiful and almost completely flat. I actually posted photos from that ride on our Website. At Glacier Auđunn did a 200 km ride from West Glacier to Many Glacier and back along the Going-to-the-Sun Road. We did the Red Bus (Jammer) tour along the Going-to-the-Sun Road, and the views were amazing! Some day I want to do that ride, but after the 10-mile hike we did to/from Iceberg Lake the day before Auđunn did the ride, I decided to take it easy and go rafting with our friends.

    ShootingStar, after the RSVP we actually rode from the Coast Plaza Hotel to the condo we rented near Chinatown. When we asked for directions, the concierge at the Coast Plaza drew us a route taking advantage of the cycle tracks (separated bike lanes) on Hornby and Dunsmuir. During that 20 minute ride, when I was totally exhausted, I just remember thinking, "This is so much easier! Why didn't Cascade have us ride along here?!!!" The alternative route you described on quiet residential streets and through the sculpture gardens sounds so much nicer than the busy, semi-industrial route RSVP took. I'll have to look into how Cascade determines the bike route for next year and find out how to suggest changes.

    That's so cool that you worked on the Golden Ears Bridge. The picture of the rider crossing it on your blog reminded me how narrow that bike lane was, and I definitely remember how impressive the bridge was. I also really like the beautiful Peace Bridge in your blog. We've always talked about going to Banff, so we may have to stop in Calgary and ride along that awesome bridge!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
    Posts
    6,984
    Feel free to PM me anytime Marie. We have a home in downtown Vancouver, near Chinatown.

    Metro Vancouver, has ...several Chinatowns. I wrote some of the blog posts here: http://www.velo-city2012blog.com/

    Banff is 200 km. north of Calgary. Calgary is definitely a different city than Vancouver. There is a lot to explore in the Canadian Rockies -- several national parks.
    Last edited by shootingstar; 10-02-2013 at 04:36 AM.
    My Personal blog on cycling & other favourite passions.
    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know what’s in a person’s heart.

 

 

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