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  1. #31
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    May 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by tongue_tied View Post
    I almost never hungry after long rides. Not for hours and hours. The only time I feel ravenous is after a short, high intensity workout, if I didn't fuel beforehand. And on a day to day basis, the only hours I feel legitimately hungry, like HONGRY, is between lunch (1PM) and dinner (after riding, about 8PM). I'm usually starving between that time. And I drink plenty of water during the day, so it's not dehydration.
    You should eat a snack between lunch and dinner. You should not be starving.

    I found that splitting lunch so that I eat half at lunchtime and half between 4:00-5:00 gets me through my evening workouts without adding extra calories.

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  2. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    131
    Bear in mind at at 170 pounds and 5'3" you are doing 5 hour century ride's on a regular basis, right? Imagine what kind of speed you will have when you get 30 pounds off. Use an app like lose it or other calories in app, and don't count calories out with them (horribly inaccurate). Decide what you want to achieve this year to improve performance next year. And if you want motivation to cut weight vs fuel endurance, start riding big hills. But mostly, take notice of actual calories in. The math is off when you are not losing weight, it is pretty simple.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
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    14,645
    Quote Originally Posted by tongue_tied View Post
    I almost never hungry after long rides. Not for hours and hours.
    That's exactly it. I have to choke down my recovery snack, too. Literally force myself to eat it, because eating is the absolute very last thing I want to do right after a hard effort. I pay for it if I don't.

    That's one of the reasons so many people like a shake or smoothie for their recovery meal - it goes down so much easier. Liquid calories sort of trick your appetite, which is a double-edged sword. Don't fear it, use it.

    I'd lay money your afternoon munchies are either glycogen depletion or too many carbs at lunch, or some combination of the two. There was just yet another study showing how carbs create hunger and cravings.
    Last edited by OakLeaf; 07-12-2013 at 10:26 AM.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  4. #34
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    That's exactly it. I have to choke down my recovery snack, too. Literally force myself to eat it, because eating is the absolute very last thing I want to do right after a hard effort. I pay for it if I don't.

    That's one of the reasons so many people like a shake or smoothie for their recovery meal - it goes down so much easier. Liquid calories sort of trick your appetite, which is a double-edged sword. Don't fear it, use it.

    I'd lay money your afternoon munchies are either glycogen depletion or too many carbs at lunch, or some combination of the two. There was just yet another study showing how carbs create hunger and cravings.

    I think candy makes me hungry, but overall carbs do not create hunger and cravings for me. And I eat plenty of carbs. I lost weight eating plenty of carbs.


    But anyway, this is the problem that started this discussion:

    "This is become a trend. I'm getting too caught up in, well, everything, that I forget how to fuel. Does anyone have any suggestions... a fail safe routine... a reality check? "

    And I think we are continuing the "well, everything," with everything we are covering in the discussion, and that will not solve the problem.

    Perhaps a food diary would be helpful for the OP. Start with a really honest look at what and how much you are eating and when you are eating it. That might show some clear opportunities for changes, both for eating during rides and healthy eating the rest of the day.

    Also think about when you are hungry and whether you find yourself full before you're finished eating a meal. The reason I started cutting my lunches into half-now-half-for-snack-later was because I realized I was getting full before I finished eating my entire lunch. I also realized I was getting full before I finished my dinner, so I reduced the amount of food I ate every night. I probably cut 500 calories out of my daily diet after that, without feeling hungry between meals. And I really think it's best to avoid feeling starved between meals, because that often leads to binging. Smaller meals more often is something worth considering.
    Last edited by ny biker; 07-12-2013 at 11:06 AM.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    6,449
    Quote Originally Posted by tongue_tied View Post
    If I go by your estimate, I need 2040 calories just to get through day to day life. .
    \

    Hmm. That estimate is meant to calculate what may be needed to maintain your current weight. Not a minimum to get through the day. I think your minimum you mentioned of around 1400 is probably the lowest you should go per day per their recommendation.

    I know that I can eat 1400 on a diet, and do well; any lower, and I lose too fast.
    Last edited by Muirenn; 07-12-2013 at 10:58 AM.
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  6. #36
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Chicago, IL
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    144
    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    That's exactly it. I have to choke down my recovery snack, too. Literally force myself to eat it, because eating is the absolute very last thing I want to do right after a hard effort. I pay for it if I don't.

    That's one of the reasons so many people like a shake or smoothie for their recovery meal - it goes down so much easier. Liquid calories sort of trick your appetite, which is a double-edged sword. Don't fear it, use it.

    I'd lay money your afternoon munchies are either glycogen depletion or too many carbs at lunch, or some combination of the two. There was just yet another study showing how carbs create hunger and cravings.
    No carbs at lunch - lunch is 98% of the time a salad with cucumbers, carrots, romaine, strawberries, and blueberries. And a little light Newman's dressing. I've been eating it now for almost 3 years.
    2009 Blue RD-1/White Selle Italia Max Flite Gel

  7. #37
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    144
    So it sounds like, from some of the later replies, I need to continue to decrease my calories in order to lose weight. God bless.
    2009 Blue RD-1/White Selle Italia Max Flite Gel

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,102
    You've been eating the same lunch for 3 years????
    I'd add a little protein into your lunch. And vary what you eat, at all of your meals. It's amazing how your body gets used to what we put into it. No wonder you are starved by 8 PM and after riding.
    I am one that is absolutely starving after a hard effort. And, even when I eat within that 1/2 hour window, I remain starving, so this is a bit hard for me to relate to. I am not that hungry during a long ride, but I now force myself to eat appropriately/often. I also have to eat half a Lara Bar before starting, even if I just had breakfast, or I am toast within an hour.
    This might be an occasion to see an RD, who specializes in sports nutrition. My sense is that you are actually not eating enough and you've put your body into starvation mode. You can lose weight and ride hard, but it takes some work, you need to cook, and adding in some other types of activity help.
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