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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,301

    Things that should have been obvious, but I've recently discovered

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    I will begin this by saying I've only had my road bike since Sept and it really didn't get any love until this spring. Before that I was completely infatuated with my MTB.

    1) Yes, you can get sunburned on your forehead through the vents. I now have attractive tiger stripes going across my forehead.

    2) While you won't get shinburger on a road bike you can get a giant goose egg near your tendon by trying to forcefully clip in, missing and having the pedal smack you.

    3) "Comfortable" shorts are as varied rider to rider as saddles. My new favorites are the LG Zone 3K. Part B) Once you are hot and gross after making a pit stop the shorts will never go back on to where and how you had them settled when you put them on before the ride.

    4) Camelbaks may look dorky on roadies, but the water stays cool longer, holds more and is extremely helpful for the uncoordinated, like me.

    5) Reaching the brakes/shifters from the drops is a challenge. I have very long fingers and it never occured to me that it would be an issue.

    6) A good fitting here costs $250. It's best to quit avoiding it and just suck it up and do it.

    7) Bonking is real, not something they make up to scare new riders. Learn how to avoid it instead of experiencing it!
    2012 Jamis Quest Brooks B17 Blue
    2012 Jamis Dakar XC Comp SI Ldy Gel
    2013 Electra Verse

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,897
    re: #5 -- I had trouble riding in the drops with my old road bike. With the current one, it's easy and comfortable. The difference is the size of the handlebars. I believe modifications are also possible for the shifters themselves, to make them easier to reach.

    - Gray 2010 carbon WSD road bike, Rivet Independence saddle
    - Red hardtail 26" aluminum mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle
    - Royal blue 2018 aluminum gravel bike, Rivet Pearl saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver 2003 aluminum road bike
    - Two awesome worn out Juliana saddles

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,301

    Re: Things that should have been obvious, but I've recently discovered

    I'll have to ask the fitter about that. I'm finally going to suck it up and make an appt.
    2012 Jamis Quest Brooks B17 Blue
    2012 Jamis Dakar XC Comp SI Ldy Gel
    2013 Electra Verse

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,501
    Probably just re-positioning the shifters could be enough, if you can reach them fine from the hoods and just not from the hooks. Or even just changing the tilt of your bars. But if you have long fingers, my guess is that the brifters are just too high up on the bars.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,301
    That makes sense.
    2012 Jamis Quest Brooks B17 Blue
    2012 Jamis Dakar XC Comp SI Ldy Gel
    2013 Electra Verse

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    248
    Let me know how the fitting goes!! (Tad Hughes??)

    I love my Camelbak. Hey, it was invented for a road event (that would be HHH), so I use it without shame. I'm finally at the point where I'm really comfortable drinking from my water bottle, but until then, the Camelbak was my best friend. And yes, it does keep the water cooler for longer, and I credit that with keeping me cool on some of these hot rides.
    "Susie" - 2012 Specialized Ruby Apex, not pink/Selle SMP Lite 209

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,301
    Quote Originally Posted by luvmyguys View Post
    Let me know how the fitting goes!! (Tad Hughes??)

    I love my Camelbak. Hey, it was invented for a road event (that would be HHH), so I use it without shame. I'm finally at the point where I'm really comfortable drinking from my water bottle, but until then, the Camelbak was my best friend. And yes, it does keep the water cooler for longer, and I credit that with keeping me cool on some of these hot rides.
    Yep, Tad. Karen and I are both going to get a fitting. Everyone in the club raves about him, so I figured he would be the go to guy. I'm fine on the bike until around mile 40 and then my knee starts to hurt and/or foot and my shoulder. I have no doubt he can fix these issues. I just need to find a day and time that he's available and I'm available

    I do still take the water bottles for electrolytes and if I just need more water, but the Camelbak is just easier until I'm more coordinated. After all, how many months has it been and I'm just now trying out the drops?!
    2012 Jamis Quest Brooks B17 Blue
    2012 Jamis Dakar XC Comp SI Ldy Gel
    2013 Electra Verse

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    452
    Funny how we're all different. I tried a Camelback, but hated having anything on my back.

    Here are the big ones I learned:

    1. How you position yourself on your bike will change over time. Don't be afraid to constantly tweak your fit.

    2. I had been having a lot of trouble with wanting to pull back my hands/arms, had three fittings, and still couldn't figure it out (shortened my stem, moved my saddle, etc.). After a year of riding, I finally figured out that my 40 handlebars were too wide. i switched to 38s and my hands fell naturally where they should have been the whole time. I'd been pulling back to compensate for too much width. Doh.

    3. If you lose weight, buy new shorts asap. I, more than once, got my chamois caught on the nose of my saddle when remounting after a stop, or standing to pedal because my shorts were a tad loose. Tight shorts are safe shorts

    4. Don't be afraid to try men's gloves. My hands/fingers swell in the heat on long rides. I finally switched to a men's medium glove and am happy, and tried five not cheap women's gloves before I figured that one out.

    5. My fav thing I learned to bring in my jersey on long rides: an old, thin washcloth in a ziplock. I don't know how many times I've used it to wipe my face in the Florida heat, and especially before reapplying sunscreen. Also, bring those wet wipes in the little packets. Great for the face and for hands after changing a tire.
    2013 Kirk Frameworks JK Special/Selle Anatomica
    2012 Gunnar Sport/Brooks B17
    2001 Calfee Tetra Pro/Selle Anatomica
    1984 Raleigh Sport/Brooks B66

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,897
    Quote Originally Posted by murielalex View Post
    2. I had been having a lot of trouble with wanting to pull back my hands/arms, had three fittings, and still couldn't figure it out (shortened my stem, moved my saddle, etc.). After a year of riding, I finally figured out that my 40 handlebars were too wide. i switched to 38s and my hands fell naturally where they should have been the whole time. I'd been pulling back to compensate for too much width. Doh.
    Very interesting. I tend to turn my hands in and my elbows out, which hunches my shoulders. A few years ago I was having problems with elbow pain caused by the too-small mouse that I used at work, and the pain was also evident when I rode my bike. I mentioned it to the fitter at the LBS, who grabbed a tape measure and measured my shoulders. He said if the pain didn't go away I could consider getting narrower handlebars, because I the ones I have (which came stock on the bike) were borderline-wide for me. I bought myself a nice ergonomic mouse for work and learned a good hand/wrist stretch from my trainer, and that solved the elbow pain so I kept my handlebars. But maybe I should reconsider getting narrower ones.

    BTW I also do not like using a Camelback when I'm riding my road bike. I don't want anything on my back when it's hot. I don't even want anything in my jersey pockets, except maybe a bag of ice.

    - Gray 2010 carbon WSD road bike, Rivet Independence saddle
    - Red hardtail 26" aluminum mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle
    - Royal blue 2018 aluminum gravel bike, Rivet Pearl saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver 2003 aluminum road bike
    - Two awesome worn out Juliana saddles

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,301
    Something interesting and anecdotal. I have seen a lot more Camelbaks on roadies since it started getting really hot than when the temps were moderate. I didn't pull out my Camelbak until I decided to start doing longer rides in this ridiculous heat. Of course, I always use a Camelbak when I'm riding the MTB.
    2012 Jamis Quest Brooks B17 Blue
    2012 Jamis Dakar XC Comp SI Ldy Gel
    2013 Electra Verse

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    99
    Quote Originally Posted by murielalex View Post
    Funny how we're all different. I tried a Camelback, but hated having anything on my back.

    3. If you lose weight, buy new shorts asap. I, more than once, got my chamois caught on the nose of my saddle when remounting after a stop, or standing to pedal because my shorts were a tad loose. Tight shorts are safe shorts
    Amen to #3!! I asked here a while back about comfortable shorts. I had lost weight (about 30 lbs) and everyone was telling me to get smaller tighter shorts.....glad I listened to the wise ladies here. I purchased a pair of Pearl Izumi In-r-cool pro shorts and couldn't be happier (except for a little sausage leg look) with the difference.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,501
    Here's another thing about weight loss (or gain) - check your seat height! If there are a couple fewer millimeters between your sitbones and your saddle, then there are a couple fewer millimeters between your sitbones and your pedal spindles, and if you're prone to knee issues, that can make a difference.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,301

    Re: Things that should have been obvious, but I've recently discovered

    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    Here's another thing about weight loss (or gain) - check your seat height! If there are a couple fewer millimeters between your sitbones and your saddle, then there are a couple fewer millimeters between your sitbones and your pedal spindles, and if you're prone to knee issues, that can make a difference.
    I agree wholeheartedly! During our ride on Saturday during our stop I raised the seat and felt better afterwards. I have a fitting on Friday so we'll see what he has to say.
    2012 Jamis Quest Brooks B17 Blue
    2012 Jamis Dakar XC Comp SI Ldy Gel
    2013 Electra Verse

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    99
    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    Here's another thing about weight loss (or gain) - check your seat height! If there are a couple fewer millimeters between your sitbones and your saddle, then there are a couple fewer millimeters between your sitbones and your pedal spindles, and if you're prone to knee issues, that can make a difference.
    Yes I am going back to my LBS that did my fit tomorrow after work and get them to raise my seat (since it is frozen after they lowered it some during the fit). Hoping that helps.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    153
    Quote Originally Posted by thekarens View Post
    5) Reaching the brakes/shifters from the drops is a challenge. I have very long fingers and it never occured to me that it would be an issue.
    Maybe compact bars with shorter drops would help (as opposed to standard bars which have longer reach and a deeper drop).
    Life goes by pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, and do whatever you want all the time, you could miss it.

    2010 Fuji Roubaix 1.0
    2007 Fuji Absolute 2.0

 

 

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