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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
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    Mrs. KnottedYet
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    9,023

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankin View Post
    I absolutely hate riding on flat pedals! I can barely get started, let a lone on a hill! I wish I didn't get the dual sided pedals for the Ariel. It comes down to just not feeling safe on the flat pedals.
    I had the dual sided pedals on my GT Outpost trail and never liked them. Always a struggle getting to the "right" side of the dual side. First 50 yards or so were flipping the pedal over over and over till I land on the flat side. Same thing if I happened to ride clipless, just getting it to the clip side on the other foot was a pain. Never again.

    Just taking a look: I have Redline pedals on the Salsa and Motobecane. Lambda pedal on the Soma and Mondonico. https://www.treefortbikes.com/MKS-La...latform-Pedals
    Last edited by Trek420; 10-02-2018 at 06:24 PM.
    Fancy Schmancy Custom Road bike ~ Mondonico Futura Legero
    Found on side of the road bike ~ Motobecane Mixte
    Gravel bike ~ Salsa Vaya
    Favorite bike ~ Soma Buena Vista mixte
    N+1 bike ~ Brompton
    http://madeinusareviews.blogspot.com/

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,697
    I like the looks of these 'sneaker' pedals from Sky King's store, or Sky King's former, emeritus status store, as it were.

    https://store.biketouringnews.com/mk...sneaker-pedal/

    MKS are supposed to be very high quality.

    I think I kind of like everything. I have some inexpensive double-sided SPD and flat pedals that I used to have on my Le Monde. I have SPD SL (3 bolt) on my Pina and Le Monde now. SPD on large platform style (both sides) on my CX. My least favorite was regular SPD without the wide pedal platform underneath. I like the support. They worked, though. Had them on my CX for years.

    It might be my background in ballet. But I guess wherever I put my foot, I'll make do.

    Huh. No wonder it ends up in my mouth so often.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles


    Surly Karate Monkey!!!

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Mrs. KnottedYet
    Posts
    9,023
    Ooh, while I have the plain lo profile alloy platform, I just noticed the colors. Might have to change pedals on the bright green Salsa Vaya to this;

    http://redlinebicycles.com/parts/mon...atform-pedals/
    Fancy Schmancy Custom Road bike ~ Mondonico Futura Legero
    Found on side of the road bike ~ Motobecane Mixte
    Gravel bike ~ Salsa Vaya
    Favorite bike ~ Soma Buena Vista mixte
    N+1 bike ~ Brompton
    http://madeinusareviews.blogspot.com/

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,441
    It's not the annoying pedal flipping that I dislike... it's the actual riding on flat pedals. Feet flying off occasionally does not help the general feeling of discombobulation I feel. Add to that the pain in my feet from continually scrunching them to help them stay on the pedals.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura
    2017 Specialized Ariel Sport

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,697
    That is the problem with a lot of the double-sided pedals. The flat side is low quality.

    I had a horrible time with gripping inside my shoes on my mountainbike flat pedals until I put a shim in the right side. And something else, too. But I can't remember what. ...?

    Speaking of flat pedals. I bought some 5-10 mountainbike flat pedal shoes last year. I initially hated them. I even tried to wear them as regular shoes a few times and also hated them. After a year of looking at a pair of expensive, useless shoes, I started wearing them for everyday. When I got used to the shoes, I finally started to wear them on my bike. And, ... I like them! So.

    The shoes I wore before always had very thick, shock absorbing soles. I guess it was just too big a change all at once. Considering buying some more. But they are pricey.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles


    Surly Karate Monkey!!!

  6. #36
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,080
    I can't see spending big bucks on special shoes for flat pedals. That's marketing B.S. Put the money into quality flats, not the shoes. If you get quality flat pedals with metal pins (not plastic) and follow up with proper technique, any kind of shoe will work, even for technical trail riding. Haven't had a shoe slip off a good quality pinned flat pedal - ever - and that's with all kinds of shoes, riding every day. I use everything from sandals in the summer to felt lined pac boots in sub-zero cold, depending on the time of year. I've also gone away from stiff soled shoes. Now prefer some flex in my shoes when pedaling. It is more comfortable for my feet and gives me even better grip. My favorite summer biking shoes, for instance, are cheap Wal-mart sneakers. The only thing I have to watch when using different shoes with different thickness soles is my seat height. I notice even that little bit of difference, sometimes. Having a QR seat clamp for quick seat height adjustment helps.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 10-03-2018 at 07:39 AM.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,697
    My pedals are top notch, so no, I don't need the shoes. But, I decided they are comfortable both on and off bike.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles


    Surly Karate Monkey!!!

  8. #38
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,979
    Okay, fans of flat pedals, how do you get started on a hill?

    With clipless, I have my left foot clipped in and my right foot on the ground. I move my left foot up to around the 2:00 position, then start to pedal with it. Then I sit down and clip in with my right foot. If for some reason I can't get the right foot clipped in on the first try, I can pedal around again with the left foot.

    Also, when shopping for flat pedals, what should I look for?

    Any thoughts on these?

    bontrager-line-pro-pedals

    I will be buying them from my LBS when I get the new bike (any day now). I will not lie, I would be very happy to orange pedals on my blue bike with orange bottle cages.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by ny biker; 10-06-2018 at 02:30 PM.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 WSD road bike, Rivet Independence saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle
    - Royal blue Trek Checkpoint gravel bike, Rivet Pearl saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome worn out Juliana saddles

  9. #39
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,080
    N.Y., I do it exactly the same way, except I start with my right foot up, since my right leg has the most power. Your feet won't slip, not to worry, as long as you have a good set of pinned flats. Plus, you won't have to waste time or lose momentum trying to clip in. Just give it all the power you want and keep climbing.

    Those Bonties will certainly work, but they're more of a downhill pedal, meaning they're heavy at 420 grams and much thicker than you need for road work and definitely too thick for trail work. On my road bikes and my trail bikes, much prefer something thinner for the sake of pedal clearance and, especially lighter. Expedo flats are much thinner and lighter at 270 grams and cheaper, too. Use them on several bikes. Great choice for either a road or trail flat.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 10-06-2018 at 03:58 PM.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,697
    Why are downhill pedals thick??
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles


    Surly Karate Monkey!!!

  11. #41
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,080
    Max durability and stability. Remember, these folks are the kamikaze riders of the bike world, often doing jumps off ledges on their way downhill, hitting speeds that are just plain spooky, riding over everything in their path. Their bikes also reflect this in being overbuilt with a geometry that puts them in the optimum position for riding downhill. Not for the timid (me ) I get spooked just on my downhill runs on my trails when I goo too fast and my runs are baby stuff by comparison.

    N.Y., what was I thinking on my pedal position? I start at about 11 o'clock with the right pedal up, then stand on it with my right foot, but immediately get down on the seat for proper traction. It's the same method I use to get started when their is any depth of snow on the ground, since the bike has no roll when it's sitting in anything more than a couple inches of snow.

  12. #42
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,979
    Thanks for the input, NWG. It is very helpful. I think my 2:00 and your 11:00 might be the same thing. Basically I try to start with the pedal as close to the highest point (12:00) as possible, after it has come up and past 12:00 and is on the way down again.

    I poked around online, looked at the Spry pedals as well as some others, and ultimately decided to order some Race Face Chesters. They get good reviews and are relatively inexpensive, so if I try them and decide I prefer clipless after all I won't be out too much $$. And I was able to get them in orange.

    I would like to try to put them on the bike myself, to save some labor costs at the bike shop. Looking at a few videos, it looks pretty easy, but one thing is not clear. Do I need to put some kind of grease on the threads before I install them, and if so do you know what kind of grease?

    Thanks!

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 WSD road bike, Rivet Independence saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle
    - Royal blue Trek Checkpoint gravel bike, Rivet Pearl saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome worn out Juliana saddles

  13. #43
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,080
    Okay, getting the pedals off on a new bike should be doable. Sometimes getting pedals off on an old bike that has had the same pedals on for years or pedals that were tightened down by a gorilla of a guy can be beyond my strength to loosen. That's when I take the bike to the bike shop.

    Can get confusing as to which direction needed to get the pedals loose or to tighten. Simple way to know. Put the wrench on the pedal and turn the crank. Turning the crank, backwards will loosen the pedal. Turning the crank forward, as when pedaling, tightens the pedal.

    Most pedals, today, use a #8 allen wrench on the inside of the pedal shaft, but some still use a 15mm metric open end wrench. Some are setup to use, either. Note that you won't get any bike tool that has a #8 allen wrench. Way too big, so you'll need to buy one. Same for the 15mm open end wrench.

    When removing the old pedals, be sure to retrieve the washer that fits on the pedal shaft and that goes between the pedal and the crank arm. Sometimes its stuck on the pedal shaft and sometimes it's stuck on the crank arm. The washer prevents wear on the crank arm. Don't install a pedal without that washer. Also, be patient when threading on a new pedal. It's a fairly fine thread and can sometimes be a little finicky to get started. Whatever you do, don't force things and get it cross-threaded. Then you've ruined an expensive crank arm.

    Absolutely, do grease the pedal shaft threads when installing a new pedal. You'll be glad you did if you ever want to remove the pedal, again. I just borrow some all-weather multi grease from my husband's shop. Don't think it has to be anything bike specific. Just a grease that won't dry out or dissolve with exposure to the elements.

    Sounds complicated, but it really isn't. The biggest issue for me and the thing I can never predict is how hard it will be to loosen the old pedals.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 10-09-2018 at 05:33 PM.

  14. #44
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,979
    Thanks!

    The new bike does not come with pedals, so that eliminates any difficulty in removing them.

    I did buy a pedal wrench to take the old pedals off my mountain bike. That was almost 2 years ago, I think. I ended up having to have the LBS mechanic take them off for the reasons you cite. But I still have the pedal wrench. Not sure about that allen wrench -- I will have to see what I have in my tool box.

    About that washer -- would it come with the bike? Or with the new pedals? Or would I have to buy some?

    I don't have any grease at home. I guess I will see what they have at the bike shop.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 WSD road bike, Rivet Independence saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle
    - Royal blue Trek Checkpoint gravel bike, Rivet Pearl saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome worn out Juliana saddles

  15. #45
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,080
    The washers should come with the bike or crankset, but the bike shop will have all kinds of them, anyway, should you ever lose one, free for the asking. Never have had to buy any.

 

 

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