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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    FL
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    Question What is the average duration of...

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    a century? How many hours long?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    San Francisco Bay Area
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    Depends on the amount of climb in the century and how long you stop at each rest stop.

    V.
    Discipline is remembering what you want.


    TandemHearts.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    FL
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    55
    Like 8 hrs? maybe?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Bendemonium
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    What? You stop at each rest stop for 8 hrs?

    What type of terrain is your century? What is your average speed on that type of terrain? Have you done a metric over the same type of terrain? What was your average riding speed and how long did it take you?

    Since everyone rides at different speeds over different terrain, there is no easy answer.
    Frends know gud humors when dey is hear it. ~ Da Crockydiles of ZZE.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
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    Well basically 160 km (about 100 miles) at 20 km/h takes 8 hours.

    160 km at 25 km/h takes 6h25m or so.

    160 km at 30 km/h takes about 5h20m.

    I used a calculator to get to these figures.

    So say you ride with a friend, drafting each other in a headwind, taking it easy, side to side, when it's easier, and are both decent riders with some endurance, you could maybe do this at 25 km/h, so 6h30, plus you stop at SAG (say 3X20?), so 7h30, plus a few 5 minutes stretching breaks? So 8 hours total would be safe.

    But of course that's a totally hypothetic scenario. It really depends on you.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    North Central Florida
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    Which one are you thinking of???

    I want to do the Valentine Century in Sanford, Saturday, if the weather is nice. It's about 120 miles from my house. There's one Sunday, too, in White Springs, the Sweetheart Century, but I'd rather ride on a Saturday.

    You're down in the "mountainous" part of Florida, so anything near you will probably include some hills, but I wouldn't think very many, and relatively short, though steep.

    It takes me about 7.5-8 hours to ride a century- less than 7 for the actual riding, but lots of stopping and eating at the SAGs. The fast people are in the 5-6 hour range.

    If you look at the Florida Bicycle Touring Calendar

    http://www.floridabicycle.org/fbtc/

    You can find a whole bunch every month.

    Nanci
    ***********
    "...I'm like the cycling version of the guy in Flowers for Algernon." Mike Magnuson

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    3,099
    base it on a workable avg spd for You. My very first century I planned on 10 hrs, hoped I could do it in 8, was pleasantly surprised when I did in it 7. Since then I've got my time to 6:15 and was overjoyed, but I Still plan on 8 hours just to be safe.

    ps: I've never done an organized century so my rest stops are short and sweet coz it's just me! and organized ride would probably add more overall time.
    Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, champagne in one hand, strawberries in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming: "Yeah Baby! What a Ride!"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Tustin, CA
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    In order to calculate your time for a century you need to take into consideration the actual length (some centuries are longer than 100 miles) and the elevation gain. If the route is hilly, how fast do you normally climb hills? 10 mph, 8, 5? Considering the descent and give yourself 10 - 15 for a sag stop every 20 miles. Fast riders can do a century easily in 5 - 5 1/2 hours. Average time is around 6 1/2 - 7 and for hilly or first time centuries expect 8 - 10 hours. My fastest century (I'm a slow climber) was just under 7 hours (that includes all the stops) and the slowest was 10 1/2 hours when I did The Ride Around The Bear which had 9000' of climbing. I had quite a few stops on that one. Also I don't like to stop more than 5 maybe 10 minutes for a sag. Some folks like to take longer. So if you normally do a 50 mile hilly club ride in 5 hours, expect century times closer to 10 hours. If the route is flatter, and you normally do flat 50 milers in say 3 1/2 - 4 hours expect a 7 - 8 hours ride.
    BCIpam - Nature Girl

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    88
    My first century was actually 104 miles and it took me 9 hours total - 7 hours 40 minutes on bike. The middle part is a really big climb, so that slowed me down quite a bit. We stopped four times, including a lunch stop. This wasn't an organized century.

    My second century was 109 miles and took 7 hours with 6 hours 20 minutes on bike time. It was less climbing - mostly rollers - and organized so there were lots of riders around to keep me motivated and moving faster.

    So, it all depends on the amount of climbing, how many stops, and your general pace.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    55

    Seriously... it might sound dumb but...

    How long (starting from scratch... like couch potatoe fitness level) does it take to train for one century? Can you use a commuter bike? Mine is pretty light, a little less lighter than my hubby's road bike (a '05 Cannondale). I'm a big girl so I decided not to get a road bike just yet. I think if Oprah went for a marathon I can do a century. If i finish one I will send a picture to her show with a sign EAT YOUR HEART OUT OPRAH!!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    9,324
    People do centuries on all kinds of bikes. Our first we did on mountain bikes on a self supported tour.

    Our first organized one, we also did on mountain bikes.

    There are all sorts of training sites out there. Do a Google search on training for a century and see what comes up. Right now I'm training to do a few doubles. I gave myself 5 months to get ready for the hardest one.

    You can do it!

    V.
    Discipline is remembering what you want.


    TandemHearts.com

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    30
    Just putting my two-penn'orth....
    Its a great thing to set yourself a goal like a century. You do get a real sense of acheivement when you finally cross that line. Its very weather and terraine dependent on how much you enjoy it as well as fast you do it!
    Having moved to New Zealand for a year or so we wanted to do as many events as we could while we were here, the UK is not as blessed with big events.
    We did the Taupo Challenge in coldish weather- max 12 degrees, wet and windy and very hilly, in 6 hours. Then we did the Taranaki Challenge - flatter, still day but very hot 31 degrees in 5 hours 17 mins. We loved the Taranaki and were just glad the Taupo event was over!
    If you are trained and have done some big distances, rested in the week prior and take plently of nutrition and hydration on the way round you won't need to stop for a rest. In fact those that did had a hard time getting going again. (On Taupo some riders even got hypothermia when they stopped and got to finish in the Ambulance!)

    Good luck with the training.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    North Central Florida
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    3,387

    Hell-Uv

    Don't forget that most Centuries have rides of much shorter distances included- like 37 miles, or 60 miles, or even shorter at the ones up here in Gainesville, so you can participate and get motivated and find out what it's like without having to go 100 miles. Centuries are really fun even if you just do the shorter rides!!

    You're lucky, you live in a place where you can pick from several Centuries each month, so you don't have to pick a specific goal Century if you don't want to- just increase your mileage, and then a month or two out, when you are riding 60-70 miles, you can narrow it down to an event you'd really like to do.

    Nanci
    ***********
    "...I'm like the cycling version of the guy in Flowers for Algernon." Mike Magnuson

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Sunny California
    Posts
    1,107

    Training for your first century

    There's some good information about training for your first century here: http://www.teamestrogen.com/articles/asa_century.asp

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Tustin, CA
    Posts
    1,308
    Just some thoughts about a century:

    It is a long ride. Anything over a metric (62 miles) is a long ride. The body starts to break down after certain distances. I can easily do 80 miles but after that, I struggle (no matter how fit) with booty problems, sore feet and a stiff neck and arms.

    I don't feel you have to do a century to do a century. In other words, if you sign up for an organized century ride, it's not necessary to do 100 miles before that. BUT you must have a good base. You should be riding or spinning a certain number of miles each week. I would say doing at least 20 - 40 3 - 4 times a week. You should be able to do a long ride on the weekend (at least 60 miles). There are alot of good articles on training for a century.

    Study up on nutrition. I feel a century is 20% physical preparation, 60% mental and 20% nutrition. Poor nutrition, poor ride. Leads to bonking.

    Can you ride through pain? If not, learn how.

    Fine a large century to try. The more people on the ride, and more physical contact with other riders, the more motivation to continue. I wouldn't pick the hilliest century around. Keep elevation gain to around 3500' or less.

    Never worry, there is always a sag. And another time. Do you best and enjoy.

    PS: I think something other than a road bike makes the ride more difficult. A hybrid bike is heavy and not particularly comfortable for long distances but you will know what's best. Plus I'm a large woman (5'8", 200 #s) and have no problem on a regular road bike. I also do centuries. Don't have to be a little, skinny person to be fit and do well. Climbing is tougher - no way around that, but it's doable.
    Last edited by bcipam; 02-10-2006 at 02:04 PM.
    BCIpam - Nature Girl

 

 

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