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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Twin Cities, Minnesota
    Posts
    486

    Total lack of fitness

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    I quit going to my spin classes sometimes last November due to problems a work.

    Now the cycling season is upon us and I don't think I can ride distances or go fast. I will try to get serious and attend the 5:45 am classes again.

    But in the meantime can anyone give me suggestions on what i can do to fit real quick?

    I KNOW I have to get in shape for the 75 mile a day ride for the MS 150. I would like to get fit enough to go on my personal century. My SO said he will provide support. BUT I MUST GET IN SHAPE!

    (The bicycling group I belong to has centuries planned every second Saturday of each month. Like I will EVER go with them on those.)

    Note: I am too afraid to wear clipless shoes again so I really lose speed as well --that's one of the reasons I won't do the centuries. I just don't want to be attached to the bicycle when I crash. I have broken all my ribs except one (some in shower stall fall and 7 in the last bike crash). I believe I still have one left that hasn't been broken and I would like to keep it that way. I also fractured my elbow 4 years ago when I couldn't unclip on one ride. And we won't even talk about when I wasn't paying attention and crashed. (I wasn't wearing clipless then).

    It just seems I might be setting myself for trouble if I go clipping in! So I need to get fit and a little extra!
    kajero
    2013 Trek FX 7.6 WSD
    2012 Specialized Ruby WSD
    2004 Schwinn (I think that is the year)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    19
    Have you considered using an indoor trainer? I have a Kinetic and I love it! It's super easy to set up and get my bike in and out of quickly. http://www.kurtkinetic.com/

    Also, regarding the clipless pedal concern, what about bike pedal straps? You'll be able to get a little more power out of your movement, but you won't be "trapped" in quite the same way you would with clipless pedals.

    Good luck to you (and your ribs)!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    4,632
    I second the idea of the trainer if you need to work around work. And you should be able to pick one up for cheaper now because bike shops are trying to get rid of them for spring.

    I don't have specific advice (intervals alternated with time in saddle or distance trainer sessions/rides maybe?), but don't dive in head first because you're trying to make up the time. You'll be more likely to injure yourself or burn yourself out that way. Ease into it.

    Good luck!
    At least I don't leave slime trails.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,394
    I'd concentrate building all around functional fitness, too with weight work and core work, as well as intervals on the bike. As Owlie said, build it up slowly.
    You don't need to go fast to do a century...
    And, if you've had consistent issues getting out of clipless pedals, you haven't found the right ones. Of course, it's fine to ride on flat pedals, but your post makes it sound like you might want to still try, because of the advantages involved.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Southern NH
    Posts
    170
    What the other women said and add everyday fitness in too. A trainer I know said to do small things during the day like take the stairs, park at the end of the parking lot, mix things by hand rather than use a mixer, walk around the block at lunch, stand when you put your shoes on, etc. No, those things alone will not get you fit, but they will add to your overall fitness over the long run.
    Melancholy is incompatible with bicycling. ~ James E.Starrs


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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Newport, RI
    Posts
    3,821
    I just went through this. I lost a lot of fitness this winter. My advice is to just ride short and slow at first. You'll see big improvements every ride.
    '02 Eddy Merckx Fuga, Selle An Atomica
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    Slacker on wheels.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Beautiful NW or Left Coast
    Posts
    5,619
    since you brought up clipless pedals, I have to ask you how you had them set up. There is no way that my feet could remain in the pedals if i was falling, i have mine set so loose so that I can pop out of them (SPD's) however and whenever. I have fallen (and almost fallen) several times and I can assure you, I do NOT stay clipped in. It's an instinctive reaction.
    I like Bikes - Mimi
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,889
    I've not noticed a significant speed difference for me when I am clipless and when I am not. I ride clipless because I've less knee issues with them rather than without - I've been toying with the idea of heading back to my BMX pedals but I probably won't.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    On my bike
    Posts
    2,505
    You don't say how old you are or what your experience is with riding & fitness in general. So - if you're young and you were previously very fit, you can probably ramp it up fairly quickly. If your are older and/or you were not in great shape when you stopped riding (great shape = 40-50 mile rides were doable) then you do need to go slowly. The rule of thumb is to increase by 10% each week. So, if you ride around 50 miles/week normally, next week you'd ride 55 miles, etc.

    Spin classes will definitely help.
    To train a dog, you must be more interesting than dirt.

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