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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    central NY
    Posts
    406

    Looking for a book

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    Can someone recommend a good book for basic bicycle maintenance and repair? Maintenance would be more important because I don't mind taking the bike to the LBS for the bigger stuff. Components have changed a lot over the years and I'd like to know I'm doing the right thing, and using the right products. How to clean, how to lube, how to seal. I need to spend a few more dollars for free Amazon shipping

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    6,132
    I have Zen and the Art of Road Bike Maintenance.

    But I'll be honest that I often find watching a video much more helpful. My husband does most of our maintenance, but before we were married, if I needed to fix something on my bike, I simply googled it and perused what came up. Park Tool's website has a lot of helpful information, in both written and video format.
    Last edited by indysteel; 12-18-2012 at 07:12 AM.
    Live with intention. Walk to the edge. Listen hard. Practice wellness. Play with abandon. Laugh. Choose with no regret. Continue to learn. Appreciate your friends. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is.

    --Mary Anne Radmacher

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,952
    I have to second Indy on this. It is useful to have books, but in the end, I turn to internet videos when it is time for me to try something mechanical on the bike. I have THIS book but I find I only turn to it when I can't seem to find a video.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    perpetual traveler
    Posts
    1,302
    Quote Originally Posted by indysteel View Post
    I have Zen and the Art of Road Bike Maintenance.

    But I'll be honest that I often find watching a video much more helpful. My husband does most of our maintenance, but before we were married, if I needed to fix something on my bike, I simply googled it and perused what came up. Park Tool's website has a lot of helpful information, in both written and video format.
    I like the Park Tool site and videos. I have the Park Tool book which adds some to what is online and has the advantage of being in the garage, by the bikes, when I want to work on something, as an easy reference.
    Trek Madone 4.7 WSD
    Cannondale Quick4
    1969 Schwinn Collegiate, original owner
    Terry Classic


    Richard Feynman: “The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool.”

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    195
    Have you tried looking on you tube? Usually someone has posted a video, regardless of topic/subject.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    central NY
    Posts
    406
    I guess the internet is the way to go, but as goldfinch said, it would be handy to have a book with me in the garage. Or take it to work to read on my breaks. Maybe learn something and gain some general information. The other day I put my new bike on a trainer. I couldn't find the quick release for the back brake, so I Googled the make and model, and sure enough, there was the diagram. I ran back downstairs and finished the job. That was fine for a quick fix, but won't be too practical if it's a big, greasy job.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    perpetual traveler
    Posts
    1,302
    I mentioned the park tool manual. I like it for modern bikes. When I worked on rehabbing my old Schwinn I ended up buying a used older manual that was good for a person with no experience working on older systems. http://www.amazon.com/Glenns-Complet.../dp/0517500930 Plus, I have learned from being a birder that it is nice to have more than one resource.
    Last edited by goldfinch; 12-19-2012 at 01:16 PM.
    Trek Madone 4.7 WSD
    Cannondale Quick4
    1969 Schwinn Collegiate, original owner
    Terry Classic


    Richard Feynman: “The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool.”

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    I like the Park Tool site too. If you have Shimano components, they have all their factory service documents on their website - don't know if the other component manufacturers do the same thing.

    For an older manual ... my first ten-speed I took apart and reassembled nearly everything on it - including the freewheel, after I found the pawls and springs when they went everywhere - with the Clear Creek Bike Book. Who else remembers that?!


    But, I don't do seals. I let the LBS take care of sealed bearings.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    PM Press is releasing an updated edition of their bicycle repair manual. Don't know anything about it. Anyone have comments on the first edition? https://secure.pmpress.org/index.php...t_detail&p=500
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Columbia, MO
    Posts
    2,051
    Sheldon Brown is a wealth of information. However, since he died, I do not know if it's being kept up to date, so there might be issues with newer bikes. I tried to talk him into publishing his site as a book while he was alive, and he was interested, but not interested enough to get around to it.
    2009 Trek 7.2FX WSD, brooks Champion Flyer S, commuter bike

 

 

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