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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    2,609

    Plantar Fasciitis

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    Just diagnosed with it, been doing PT and stretching for two weeks now and it still hurts. Been riding a little bit, but need to really get back into training. Been avoiding bare feet, have inserts in all my shoes - including my cycling shoes. Anyone have any tips or hints to get this gone quickly???
    For 3 days, I get to part of a thousand other journeys.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Flagstaff AZ
    Posts
    2,516
    freeze a round bottle and ice your feet - look up on internet stretches for plantar fasciitis; they consist of stretching lower calves and that area. That gets tight and it pulls on your arch area

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,501
    Trigger point work, trigger point work, trigger point work. It will hurt like crazy, worse than your ITBs ever felt on the foam roller, but you'll be able to tell it's that same good hurt, and it should start giving you relief pretty quickly. Whenever you're standing or sitting, roll your feet out on a spiky ball or stick; if you have anywhere you can walk barefoot on gravel this time of year, or if you can bring a box of gravel into the house, do it for a few minutes each day.

    The other thing that really helps my Achilles - very closely related - is barefoot single leg calf raises. If you need support starting out, do NOT hold tightly to anything since the point of the exercise is to strengthen the stabilizing muscles and align the feet and ankles. Just rest your fingertips lightly on a wall, chair back, etc., and experiment with doing them no hands, until you can do two sets of 15 on each leg without hanging on. Go as high up on the balls of your feet as you can. Then immediately stretch out the calves, both gastroc and soleus. If you have a varus or valgus heel, use a little wedge to align your foot while you stretch. (A rubber door stop works ... or stretching in a door frame between rooms where the carpet is of different thickness.) Whenever my Achilles or plantar fascia start acting up, I double down on those exercises and it works them right out.

    Another highly recommended exercise (that I personally usually neglect ) is putting the edge of a towel under your toes, then use your toes to skrunch up the towel toward you and then extend it back out away from you.


    Along the lines of the night splint (which only give me very temporary relief and I don't even bother with them any more), make sure to un-tuck the sheets on your bed, so that your sheets and blankets aren't forcing you to plantar flex while you sleep.
    Last edited by OakLeaf; 12-13-2012 at 12:45 PM.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,609
    Thanks for all these great ideas! I'm doing all the stretches the PT suggested, and I'll add these to the repertoire. I was told that walking barefooted was bad - but is walking on gravel recommended? What about sand? (I'm in Miami, afterall...)
    For 3 days, I get to part of a thousand other journeys.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Arlington, VA
    Posts
    1,993
    First and foremost, I am so sorry. I had it over the summer and it took a good two or three months for it to heal. Be patient---you will get better. You should be able to ride your bike and do low impact stuff while you're getting better. Swim (so says the swimming addict, haha. Seriously, it does help). Or aqua jog.

    Wearing a night brace helped me tremendously, especially with the horrible first steps after sleep pain. Forget the Strassburg sock--it will pull too much on your big toe. In any event, Road Runner Sports sells a decent brace online (worth every penny of the cost).

    Proceed cautiously and don't do any foot/lower leg strengthening work until the PT thinks you're ready. I had major setbacks when an inexperienced PT had me doing barefoot balance work on a foam pad too soon. Stretching helps a lot, icing it as well (bucket filled w/ice water suffices nicely). Agree the massage will help it heal faster as well. I've found some good tips at a heelsspurs.com or .org (can't remember which). In addition, Wahine posted a thread on it, so if you search, you'll find her tips.

    You might need to stick with having decent insoles in your shoes (work, sneakers, etc). Superfeet worked great for me. In addition, Birkenstocks and Naot make supportive shoes that don't require the insole. Naot has some work-friendly styles and so comfortable.

    Best wishes for a fast recovery!!

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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,394
    +1 on the Naot shoes.
    I had PF about 25 years ago. One treatment I had, that hasn't been mentioned, was ultrasound/massage, when my foot was in some kind of small whirlpool and the ultrasound waves were sent through the water. Perhaps they don't do this anymore, but it helped a lot. I also did the stretches and got custom orthotics for my aerobics shoes, which were the source of the issue (more like teaching 7 classes a week on concrete floors, covered by carpet). I have never had another incident.
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Boise Idaho
    Posts
    1,162
    just one more suggestion. Keep the knots out of your calves as everything works together. I get on my hands and knees, take the right knee and press it into the left calf moving it back and forth in circular motion up an down calf. Then repeat on right calf using left knee.
    Sky King
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,501
    Quote Originally Posted by Pedal Wench View Post
    Thanks for all these great ideas! I'm doing all the stretches the PT suggested, and I'll add these to the repertoire. I was told that walking barefooted was bad - but is walking on gravel recommended? What about sand? (I'm in Miami, afterall...)
    Barefoot on gravel just to work out the knots in the fascia, not for any long period of time. I don't think I'd be walking on sand just yet if I were you - not even in shoes.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    St. Pete, FL
    Posts
    1,101
    All are great ideas/suggestions. I still have a "touch" of PF that does flare from time to time. But what worked the best for me is that I mostly wear barefoot style shoes for all walking. I went to 4mm heel drop on my running shoes and identified that the danskos I wore to work were probably what was aggrevating it and switch to a lower heel drop shoe. I am better. I am a poor stretcher but do try to work on my calves. Again, see if there are a certain pair of shoes that may be aggrevating/contributing. Just my 2 cents worth.

    K
    katluvr

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,609
    Quote Originally Posted by katluvr View Post
    .....identified that the danskos I wore to work were probably what was aggrevating it and switch to a lower heel drop shoe. I am better. I am a poor stretcher but do try to work on my calves. Again, see if there are a certain pair of shoes that may be aggrevating/contributing. Just my 2 cents worth.
    K
    Wow. I wore Keens everyday this summer. Same pair, forever. When I went to NY for Thanksgiving, broke out my old Danskos for the colder weather. By the time I got back home, I had to change out of the Danskos just to get out of the airport. I wonder if that's what did it!!! *written while icing foot, which will be followed by stretches and more icing tonight!*
    Last edited by Pedal Wench; 12-15-2012 at 01:36 PM.
    For 3 days, I get to part of a thousand other journeys.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    2,545
    +1 on identifying problem shoes. That's what caused my problem. Good luck.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    1,632
    I swear by this roller/log: http://www.roadrunnersports.com/rrs/products/FOL001/

    I keep it at hand (or should I say "at foot"?) all the time, under the sofa. I dealt with PF nearly 10 years ago, for about 18 months. Luckily, I have not had it again.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    194
    Quote Originally Posted by Pedal Wench View Post
    Wow. I wore Keens everyday this summer. Same pair, forever. When I went to NY for Thanksgiving, broke out my old Danskos for the colder weather. By the time I got back home, I had to change out of the Danskos just to get out of the airport. I wonder if that's what did it!!! *written while icing foot, which will be followed by stretches and more icing tonight!*
    i ended up with PF a few yrs ago, and im pretty sure it was caused by the Dansko clogs i wore to work, the sole is so stiff that the clog does not let your foot bend naturally (the pair i had didnt).
    I would apply ice packs to the bottom of my feet as often as possible. For work, i would take a second pair of shoes and put them in the freezer at the beginning of my shift and swap the shoes every couple hrs. Applying Ibuprofen based cream to the bottom of feet helped a bit.
    Now im super picky with what i put on my feet. I own 8-9 pair of Noat shoes....worth every penny! Munro also makes good shoes.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    307
    I have had it for 13 months and still struggling. However, you have been given really good advice and I hope you find relief soon.
    200x Electra Townie 24D/Brooks B67

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    1,632
    Indeed! You will recover. For me, the last tiny bit of pain went away went I started jogging again. I went through physical therapy, some anti inflammatory medication delivered with iontophoreis, icing, taping my feet, night splints, etc -- at some point, the pain was so bad, I could not walk 2 blocks... I'd literally take a cab at that point. After 18 months, I still had some residual pain, but I started jogging very gradually: 10 min three times a week for a couple of weeks, 15 minutes, 20 minutes... + walking and thorough stretching afterwards and again later in the day. I also stretched first thing in the morning, right out of bed. I also used the log I linked in an earlier post, every evening.

    For about a year after the worst of the pain was over, I'd get pain if I was on my feet several hours. I am still careful about the shoes I use for walking (sometimes even between buildings at work), but I can use heels at work. For walking and jogging, I always have some arch support. My favorite insoles are Powerstep Pinnacle ones (esoles on the cycling shoes). Superfeet just do not have enough of an arch for me. In the summer, I walk with Chaco sandals, following recommendations I read in this forum. I use the sandals with the toe loop. Once in the office, I change into dressier shoes.

 

 

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