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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    251

    Running as cross-training?

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    I have been able to continue to ride fairly frequently even as winter approaches. I will ride outside until near freezing, then I have a trainer for the icky days. I had a spell of about 5 days I couldn't ride at all and really felt the effects of it. I realize it's typical to lose some cycling fitness, however, I'm going to have about 1 month coming up that I won't be able to ride indoors or out, either one. I'm not a good runner. I really stink at it, actually and usually can only jog at about a 10 minute/mile pace for a couple, three miles... usually one mile jogging, a half mile walking, a mile jogging, half mile walking, etc. I'm wondering, if that is my only possible form of exercise for a three or four weeks, how often/long would you guys recommend running to keep some decent level of fitness? My indoor trainer workouts are 60 - 75 minutes each, but there is no way I could run that long. Mainly I want to be able to come back and not have lost a lot of fitness, so I can go back to riding when I get home. I know very little about running or jogging for fitness. Thanks for any thoughts!
    The bicycle has done more for the emancipation of women than anything else in the world. ~ Susan B. Anthony

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    329
    If the running is your only exercise for a month- you may be pleasantly surprised at how the proportion of running to walking and your speed in general improve! (: Even if you can't run an equivalent time to start- just walk fast when you need a break........In the years I coached track I was always so happy to see those kids that could barely do a lap or two progress to 5k by the end of the season (:

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by tealtreak View Post
    If the running is your only exercise for a month- you may be pleasantly surprised at how the proportion of running to walking and your speed in general improve! (: Even if you can't run an equivalent time to start- just walk fast when you need a break........In the years I coached track I was always so happy to see those kids that could barely do a lap or two progress to 5k by the end of the season (:
    Thanks, tealtreak! How often and for how long jogging each time would be a good goal for those weeks that I can't be in the saddle at all?
    The bicycle has done more for the emancipation of women than anything else in the world. ~ Susan B. Anthony

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,501
    Let your body tell you that. You don't want to do too much too soon - that's a recipe for injury. Start much slower and shorter, and with more walking intervals, than what you think you can do. See how you feel the next day and let that be your guide to what to do next. (And don't just figure that if you feel completely fresh with no soreness at all, you can go ahead and double your workout! )
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    329
    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    Let your body tell you that. You don't want to do too much too soon - that's a recipe for injury. Start much slower and shorter, and with more walking intervals, than what you think you can do. See how you feel the next day and let that be your guide to what to do next. (And don't just figure that if you feel completely fresh with no soreness at all, you can go ahead and double your workout! )

    Good answer! While I have many fond memories of near death cross country practices.......once we are "older" haha too much too soon usually leads to orthopedic problems that can be long lasting! So take it as it comes and don't be discouraged by the walking parts- just walk quickly and don't over stride (:

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,394
    About twice a year I start adding in running; usually in the fall or early spring. I am a slow runner and I have to build up with walk/run intervals. But, it doesn't take much to keep me fit; you can't equate it to cycling time. Thirty or forty minutes does it.
    Running is really hard on my body, so I don't do it for more than 3 months at a time.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    251
    Thank you, all! Great information. Yes, I'm not really fit for running, and know nothing about how to incorporate this into a fitness regimen. I don't know what to do and not to do, and like Crankin, I couldn't do it for very long anyway. Not at my age. Really, I'm just looking to maintain my fitness level when I'm in a place where walking/running is my only means of exercise.
    The bicycle has done more for the emancipation of women than anything else in the world. ~ Susan B. Anthony

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    where the wind comes sweeping down the plain
    Posts
    5,251
    Quote Originally Posted by velo View Post
    I really stink at it, actually and usually can only jog at about a 10 minute/mile pace for a couple, three miles...
    OK- first of all, if you are doing 10 min/miles you are RUNNING, not jogging. Heck, even at 13+ min/miles I consider myself to be a runner. 10 min/miles are VERY respectable IMO. If you think you stink at 10 min/miles, you're way better than you think.

    Now, back to the question at hand. I would say if you can run/walk 3-4 days a week for 20-45 min I think you will be just fine maintaining your fitness. There really is no way to maintain specific running fitness without running or specific cycling fitness without cycling (having experienced different injuries that kept me out of one or the other for a month or more), but you will certainly be able to maintain your muscle and cardio fitness for sure!! Just let your body be your guide. Walk more if you need to, run more if you feel good. There's no shame in run/walk intervals to keep you fit without risking injury from increasing mileage too quickly. Start with run 3 min/walk 1 and see how that feels. Go from there. Good luck!
    Last edited by Tri Girl; 12-11-2012 at 03:09 PM.
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    251
    Thank you, Trigirl. Well, I can't string more than a single mile of "running" together, so not sure how respectable that is. Intervals will be the only way I can do running, and I wonder what my knees are going to do with this activity. Maintaining cardio fitness is my main goal. I know others run in addition to riding, so I knew I'd get some good answers here. I will absolutely listen to my body, start out walking a lot more than running, and... go from there! It has turned off quite a bit colder now, so I'm riding my trainer more. I'd like to do some running here at home just to see what I'm capable of, but want to spend every day possible in the saddle before I have to say bye-bye to the bike for a while.

    My shoes are actually "trail" running shoes. Will those suffice for a few weeks? How do they differ from shoes for urban jogging? I may be able to do some jogging on the beach. Is that advisable for a newbie?
    The bicycle has done more for the emancipation of women than anything else in the world. ~ Susan B. Anthony

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    247
    TriGirl beat me to it! Look, you aren't training for a race here, you just want to keep in shape. So just run. If your pace bothers you, then stop looking at your watch. Again, TriGirl had good suggestions with respect to time/length/number of runs.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by roo4 View Post
    TriGirl beat me to it! Look, you aren't training for a race here, you just want to keep in shape. So just run. If your pace bothers you, then stop looking at your watch. Again, TriGirl had good suggestions with respect to time/length/number of runs.
    Thank you, roo. No, I'm not training for a race, but it's a lot more than just keeping in shape. I have worked very hard to get back to where I am in regards to my cycling fitness this past year . At my age, the last thing I'd want to do is lose ground. I'm just trying to understand running as a tool to maintain that *cycling* fitness for a short period of time, so that when I get back I've not lost a lot in regards to saddle time. I know NOTHING about running/jogging, so "just run" doesn't even equate with me. I don't even know what that means. I guess if you're a runner then my questions must seem very elementary. Sorry.
    The bicycle has done more for the emancipation of women than anything else in the world. ~ Susan B. Anthony

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    247
    No, no, don't be sorry. I wasn't trying to make light of your situation. Many people like the Couch to 5K plan (google it) for a nice easy introduction to running. Hal Higdon also has some easy plans, and I believe the website at Runner's World still has some free beginner plans. They are aimed at preparing you for a 5K race, but can also be used to get in running shape. Be careful, running can be habit-forming.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Central NJ
    Posts
    866
    I incorporated running/jogging/fast walking (whatever you want to call it) into my off-season plan this year and in hindsight, this is what I would suggest:

    Be sure you have a pair of shoes that fit you well. I was having some knee pain when I first started. A new pair of sneaks fixed this. I would also highly suggest following a training plan of some sort. I did Couch to 5k and it kept me from pushing too much too soon. As a noobie, I would also start running on flat terrain or a treadmill. Finally, don't stress about the time. Running is great because you can get in a fast workout with intensity in a fraction of the time it takes to ride. Be sure to stretch and let any pain or discomfort be your limiter. Have fun!
    Girl meets bike. Bike leads girl to a life of grime: http://mudandmanoloscycling.com/

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,394
    I used couch to 5K last spring, but running still is very stressful for my body. I liked the program a lot, a it forced me not to do too much. My issue is that running, along with all of the other things I do, seems to push my chronic injuries over the top.
    Any running/walking intervals will keep you fit...
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  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    251
    Thanks for the Couch to 5k suggestion. It's just what I was looking for as a place to get an idea of how to work up to something. I'm little bit along the plan, as I have been doing a little bit of running/walking on nasty-weather days that I just didn't want to be on the trainer. It gives me a good idea of how to tailor my plans, though, so that I don't overdo anything while still getting in a good workout for cardio maintenance. Thanks again! Happy Holidays to all. See you next year!
    The bicycle has done more for the emancipation of women than anything else in the world. ~ Susan B. Anthony

 

 

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