Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 24 of 24
  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    195

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    Indy,
    Your not off track. After reading your post acouple times it dawned on me I've been making a mistake. This whole time I was thinking the problem was the bikes gearing. Apparently it's operator error...LOL OMGOD! I can't believe i never figured this out. The reason I been getting knee pain is I was riding in the largest chainring and littlest cog and just plowing thru even though it was killing me. No wonder it was pretty tough pedaling!!!!!
    I seriously need to practice shifting....a lot!
    All I can say in my defense is I started riding in June...lol.....geez I feel like a smuck! What a really dumb mistake!
    THANKYOU!!!!!!! Your brillant ! My knees THANKYOU!!!!!

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    6,132
    Yay! I'm so happy to have helped you and your knees!
    Live with intention. Walk to the edge. Listen hard. Practice wellness. Play with abandon. Laugh. Choose with no regret. Continue to learn. Appreciate your friends. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is.

    --Mary Anne Radmacher

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    6,132
    One more thing. Try to avoid riding in your liitle ring/big cog and big ring/ little cog combos. That's called crosschaining, and it's hard on your chain.
    Live with intention. Walk to the edge. Listen hard. Practice wellness. Play with abandon. Laugh. Choose with no regret. Continue to learn. Appreciate your friends. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is.

    --Mary Anne Radmacher

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    California
    Posts
    371
    Quote Originally Posted by indysteel View Post
    One more thing. Try to avoid riding in your liitle ring/big cog and big ring/ little cog combos. That's called crosschaining, and it's hard on your chain.
    I'm sure you meant to write: "Try to avoid riding in your little ring/little cog and big ring/big cog combos. That's called crosschaining, and it's hard on your chain." It is called crosschaining because the chain quite literally crosses from one side over to the other.
    Laura

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    6,132
    Oh my gosh; you're right. That's what I get for writing posts at 6 in the morning. Thanks for catching that.
    Live with intention. Walk to the edge. Listen hard. Practice wellness. Play with abandon. Laugh. Choose with no regret. Continue to learn. Appreciate your friends. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is.

    --Mary Anne Radmacher

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,465
    Quote Originally Posted by Wasp View Post
    How does one stop bouncing in the saddle? I tend to bounce and not "spin" which I'm sure is not very attractive. Or maybe the question is how does one spin without bouncing?? In theory It seems like it should be a fairly easy skill, but I struggle daily with the whole spin thing. My legs are quite strong and I tend to power thru vrs spinning, but I would really like to learn how to spin properly.
    Is your saddle too high? This can cause rocking.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    195
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    Is your saddle too high? This can cause rocking.
    I don't think the saddle is too high, however being a newbie maybe it is. I can sit on the saddle, and balance myself on my tippy toes. I had the LBS guy check it out, and he seemed to think it was ok. Last night I was looking at posts about trainers, and realized that when I was fitted for my bike the bike was on a trainer and the front wheel was elevated with some type of plastic block. Now I'm wondering if that would of affected the fit? I had them add a stem riser because I kept feeling like I was falling forward, the stem riser fixed that problem but.....other "roadies" often comment or do a double take when they notice, so im starting to think most cyclist dont put stem risers on there road bike.
    Considering I had next to nil core strength when I started out, the stem riser helped with a more upright position. But I still wonder if that plastic block affected the whole fit issue. To get a bike fitted is it usually done only on a trainer?
    I have a spin bike and at 90 rpm I don't bounce, so there must be something off with the fit? Or is this bouncing caused by being inexperienced? Or both?

    It's definatley bouncing....up and down.....no side to side movement

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    California
    Posts
    371
    Quote Originally Posted by Wasp View Post
    I was fitted for my bike the bike was on a trainer and the front wheel was elevated with some type of plastic block. Now I'm wondering if that would of affected the fit?
    The plastic block was to make the bike mostly level while on the trainer. The reason is that the trainer has to raise the rear wheel up off the floor so that the wheel can spin. Without a block of some sort under the front wheel, the bike would be "going downhill".
    Laura

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    Quote Originally Posted by Wasp View Post
    I have a spin bike and at 90 rpm I don't bounce, so there must be something off with the fit? Or is this bouncing caused by being inexperienced? Or both?
    A spin bike is much heavier than a rideable bike, and it doesn't have suspension (in the form of tires) between the frame and the ground, so it takes a LOT to make one bounce. As in, a WHOLE lot. (Pick your rideable bike up a couple of inches off the ground, be ready to catch it when it bounces, then drop it and watch it bounce. Now try the same thing with the spin bike, except don't bother being ready to catch it, because it isn't going to bounce.)

    It's possible there's a fit issue, but it's more likely just a matter of practice.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •