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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    California
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    356

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    Quote Originally Posted by zoom-zoom View Post
    The tubes and tires would be my last suspicion. I have Kenda Nevegals, which people around here always seem to rave about.
    Could the tires be inflated too much? It sounds counter intuitive because higher inflation means less sidewall flex and thus less energy lost flexing the sidewalls. However, overinflation also makes you bounce over every little road/trail irregularity. Lifting you up a millimeter and then dropping back down takes a lot more energy than you might save in reduced sidewall flex.

    A nearby university has a sidewalk / utility road where one side is concrete and the other is asphalt. Riding on the concrete is annoying because of the constant thump-thump across each expansion joint. However, it is the easier and faster ride. In contrast, the asphalt has constant rolling irregularities that just sap all my energy and speed.
    Laura

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    West MI
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    4,259
    Quote Originally Posted by laura* View Post
    Could the tires be inflated too much? It sounds counter intuitive because higher inflation means less sidewall flex and thus less energy lost flexing the sidewalls. However, overinflation also makes you bounce over every little road/trail irregularity. Lifting you up a millimeter and then dropping back down takes a lot more energy than you might save in reduced sidewall flex.
    Nah...I have a hard time going even 9-10mph on the paved road with this bike and have to kill myself to do so--it feels like the bike is fighting me every pedal stroke. By contrast my POS Schwinn that I had years ago that was too big, had much lower-end components, and weighed more was easy to roll at 11-12mph when I had no cycling fitness. I can get a heavier Salsa Mukluk fat bike going much faster on the road than the F5, with FAR less effort. Generally we have the tires on the F5 around 30psi, IIRC.
    Kirsten
    run/bike log
    zoomylicious


    '11 Cannondale SuperSix 4 Rival
    '12 Salsa Mukluk 3
    '14 Seven Mudhoney S Ti/disc/Di2

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Beautiful NW or Left Coast
    Posts
    5,619
    I think if the bike is not a good fit for you, you cannot get your legs moving well enough to do speed. I remember when I changed from a trek hybrid to a bianchi. The bianchi just wanted to go go go. The difference was very obvious.
    Different frame angles can definitely slow you down. It's just physics. It doesn't have to be a heavier bike or a defective bike. It just has to do with the way it was made and the way you are made. Sounds like you need a new bike, i mean, after all you are "zoom zoom" go get you a bike that zooms.
    I like Bikes - Mimi
    Watercolor Blog

    Davidson Custom Bike - Cavaletta
    Dahon 2009 Sport - Luna
    Old Raleigh Mixte - Mitzi

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    West MI
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    4,259
    Quote Originally Posted by Biciclista View Post
    I think if the bike is not a good fit for you, you cannot get your legs moving well enough to do speed. I remember when I changed from a trek hybrid to a bianchi. The bianchi just wanted to go go go. The difference was very obvious.
    Different frame angles can definitely slow you down. It's just physics. It doesn't have to be a heavier bike or a defective bike. It just has to do with the way it was made and the way you are made. Sounds like you need a new bike, i mean, after all you are "zoom zoom" go get you a bike that zooms.
    That was DH's theory, too, but then it makes no sense that I can get my friend's even smaller Ala Carte up to speed without much trouble. That thing feels positively zippy, even though the bikes aren't all that different in size and geo. Both bikes fit my DS really well, but he ends up really frustrated on the Cannondale and can only ride about half the distance before he's exhausted and wants to quit.
    Kirsten
    run/bike log
    zoomylicious


    '11 Cannondale SuperSix 4 Rival
    '12 Salsa Mukluk 3
    '14 Seven Mudhoney S Ti/disc/Di2

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    208
    Quote Originally Posted by zoom-zoom View Post
    Those are all interesting possibilities. How easy is it to determine any of these possibilities and diagnose? The tubes and tires would be my last suspicion. I have Kenda Nevegals, which people around here always seem to rave about.

    What is so frustrating is all the glowing reviews I read of the Cannondale F5. I have a friend with the EXACT same bike (Cdale had a bunch of the petite size sitting in a warehouse and essentially liquidated them about a year ago). She rides far less than I do and on the road with our road bikes I can ride circles around her. On trails I can barely keep up with her and end up beating myself up trying to do so.

    The first thing to check would be wheel trueness. "Dish" (proper spacing of the rims between the dropouts) and "lateral trueness" (no side-to-side warping of the rims) are most relevant here. Roundness of the rims (vertical trueness) wouldn't affect tracking.

    The easiest way to check the rims is with a truing stand and a dishing tool, but you can improvise tools to do a quick check of trueness (http://sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild.html#improvised). Spoke tension can be checked with a special tool, or in a pinch, by listening to the tone when the spokes are plucked (http://www.bikexprt.com/bicycle/tension.htm). Check Sheldon Brown's web site for truing methods.

    Checking the frame alignment is best done with a special tool. You could do a preliminary check of alignment by improvising (http://sheldonbrown.com/forkend-alignment.html), but your best bet is to take the bike to your local bike shop -they should be willing to check alignment for for free, or for a very minimal charge.
    JEAN

    2011 Specialized Ruby Elite - carbon fiber go-fast bike
    DiamondBack Expert - steel road bike
    Klein Pinnacle - classic no-suspension aluminum MTB

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    959
    As I mentioned earlier, check the wheels. Take the wheels off the bike and spin the wheels in your hands, make sure that the axle in in your hands and NOT the quick release. If the bearing adjustment is too tight, then the wheel will spin and feel as though it is catching in your hands.

    Although you only have 225 miles on the bike, it still could have dirt/water inside the hubs making them not spin as freely. I know that you mentioned that your DH services the bike, perhaps a trip to your LBS is also in order. They should ahve the experience to check the entire bike over, and give you a pretty quick answer. I seriously doubt that the frame is out of alignment etc.... again check the wheels!

    As for the Nevegals, they are indeed a bit heavier tire but they are meant for "traction." If you're riding in an area that you don't need that much grip, then change your tires. I typically ride the Kenda Small Block 8's early in the season when it's dry, but this time of year I"m riding the Nevegals for traction over the wet roots and leaves.

    Good Luck!!

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Beautiful NW or Left Coast
    Posts
    5,619
    i still say, get rid of the stupid bike. You won't be sorry. Or you can take it to a shop and have them try and find what was wrong with it.
    I like Bikes - Mimi
    Watercolor Blog

    Davidson Custom Bike - Cavaletta
    Dahon 2009 Sport - Luna
    Old Raleigh Mixte - Mitzi

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Traveling Nomad
    Posts
    6,763
    I have to agree with Mimi. If you had a lot invested in it and/or it was a fine bike, then it would certainly be worth trying to figure out what is wrong. But as inexpensive as it was, I'd just try to sell it for ~$300, figure the $50 was not a lot to lose, and move on.
    Emily

    2011 Jamis Dakar XC "Toto" - Selle Italia Ldy Gel Flow
    2007 Trek Pilot 5.0 WSD "Gloria" - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow
    2004 Bike Friday Petite Pocket Crusoe - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    98
    Quote Originally Posted by Becky View Post
    Nevs are definitely a slow tire (but they grip everything!!), so I wouldn't discount that.
    http://www.kendausa.com/en/home/bicy...n/nevegal.aspx

    There are lots of Nevs, some very heavy (read: lots of ruber to flex and eat up your energy). I'm with Becky: try known-good tires before getting rid of the bike.

    '09 Trek 7.3 FX hybrid / Jett 155mm
    '09 Cervelo P3 TT / looking
    '11 Cervelo S3 road / Selle Royal Seta 155mm
    Ischial tuberosities: 140mm center to center

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    West MI
    Posts
    4,259
    Hmmm...the thing is I've gone from small block 8s to a much heavier and wider tire on my CX bike and never noticed a huge difference--I actually like the heavier tire because they are much more aggressive, more stable down hills and rough areas, and I can bomb through sandy and muddy areas better (which is pretty much all of West MI--it's all sand dunes with pathetic grass). I asked my DH about the possibility of the Nevegals being the issue and he pointed out that the tires on the Mukluk are WAY heavier and that bike still was noticeably easier to move and keep moving, even up hills.

    I almost wonder if it's more than one factor at play and that we could end up spending a lot of time and money to not really come up with any one solution for a bike that we'll likely sell in a year or two. I'd really like to borrow one of my friends' identical bikes (I think there were 4 of us who ended up with this bike when our LBS had them a year ago) for a few miles and see if theirs are noticeably different.

    We'll definitely be looking for a higher end used bike for the rugrat when the time comes. I don't want him to always be stuck frustrated with heavy, sluggish bikes. He's such a slight kid that he can't even use his body weight to beast a bike around (unlike me, heh).
    Kirsten
    run/bike log
    zoomylicious


    '11 Cannondale SuperSix 4 Rival
    '12 Salsa Mukluk 3
    '14 Seven Mudhoney S Ti/disc/Di2

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    where the wind comes sweeping down the plain
    Posts
    5,251
    I don't know, but it's something I've been wondering for a few years now. I, too, have a Cannondale F5 (but from '07). I'm like a slug on that thing, but can ride my friends Salsa mtn bike (that is about the same weight) with SO much less effort. I'm perplexed. The shop I bought it from fit me to it so I'm certain it's the right size (they've fit my other 3 bikes just perfectly).
    Makes me wish I'd never gotten rid of my old crappy rigid Trek mtn bike....
    Check out my running blog: www.turtlepacing.blogspot.com

    Cervelo P2C (tri bike)
    Bianchi Eros (commuter/touring road bike)

    1983 Motobecane mixte (commuter/errand bike)
    Cannondale F5 mountain bike

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Black Forest, CO
    Posts
    26
    Okay, I am not a techie, but everyone has mentioned wheels and tires, but could it be something in the bottom bracket that is causing interference? Maybe you're getting some resistance there.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    West MI
    Posts
    4,259
    Quote Originally Posted by Tri Girl View Post
    I don't know, but it's something I've been wondering for a few years now. I, too, have a Cannondale F5 (but from '07). I'm like a slug on that thing, but can ride my friends Salsa mtn bike (that is about the same weight) with SO much less effort. I'm perplexed. The shop I bought it from fit me to it so I'm certain it's the right size (they've fit my other 3 bikes just perfectly).
    Makes me wish I'd never gotten rid of my old crappy rigid Trek mtn bike....
    Which spec. level is yours? Granted, mine is not the top of the line for the model, but it definitely wasn't a truly "entry level" bike, either. I've been told that the fork, alone, would probably have been a $350 fork. A mix of SRAM X5 and X7 is not crap, either.

    But for the life of me I cannot figure out how the F5 was Cannondale's top-selling mountain bike at the time if they all were this doggy.

    I have ridden with a friend who rides a heavy full-suspension mtn. bike and leaves me in the dust when I'm on my F5. On CX and road bikes of similar quality and weight we are very nearly perfectly matched in terms of speed at comparable effort. You'd never know we have similar fitness levels to see us ride mountain bikes together.
    Kirsten
    run/bike log
    zoomylicious


    '11 Cannondale SuperSix 4 Rival
    '12 Salsa Mukluk 3
    '14 Seven Mudhoney S Ti/disc/Di2

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    West MI
    Posts
    4,259
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlieggo View Post
    Okay, I am not a techie, but everyone has mentioned wheels and tires, but could it be something in the bottom bracket that is causing interference? Maybe you're getting some resistance there.
    I have wondered about this. DH played with the brakes and we'll see if that makes any difference. He really doesn't think it's the hubs/wheels. BB is next on our list of things to examine.
    Kirsten
    run/bike log
    zoomylicious


    '11 Cannondale SuperSix 4 Rival
    '12 Salsa Mukluk 3
    '14 Seven Mudhoney S Ti/disc/Di2

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    6,043
    Have you ever ridden the bike with a different wheelset? That might help rule out the wheels as the issue.
    Live with intention. Walk to the edge. Listen hard. Practice wellness. Play with abandon. Laugh. Choose with no regret. Continue to learn. Appreciate your friends. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is.

    --Mary Anne Radmacher

 

 

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