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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    374

    Should I get a bike fit? If so, is now a good time?

    I've had my Ruby for about 7 months now and I love it. I don't ride too often (wish I could) or too long due to time constraints but when I do, I find that I put a lot of pressure on my hands and afterwards, my shoulders and neck feel stiff. I don't know if it's because I'm out of shape since I don't bike as often as I'd like, or if I'm in the wrong position.

    I've read about bike fitting and want to try though they are very expensive in my area which is around NYC ($200-$375 with some places charging even more). Here are places that I'm considering that have been recommended

    http://store.repartocorse.com/repart...ing-p2805.aspx - he is a member of my bike club and charges $200

    http://togabikes.com/articles/toga-p...ices-pg171.htm - they charge about $375

    http://www.signaturecycles.com/#mi=1...&p=-1&a=0&at=0 - they charge over $400

    I'm trying to figure out if I should pull the trigger because I'm more of a recreational rider than a racer and the number of miles I ride a week is embarrassing compared to many so not sure if a fit is even needed for someone with my skill level and riding habits.

    Secondly, if I do get a fit, is it worth it to do it now with cycling season winding down (I don't ride below 35 degrees) or should I wait until next Spring? The person who is on the first link I sent actually says he is available for consulting for 12 months after your fitting.

    Thoughts on this? Thanks in advance for your help.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    San Antonio Heights, CA (Upland)
    Posts
    1,068
    I highly recommend a bike fit and I would be surprised if anyone here didn't. Even as a recreational rider, if you are having pain, a bike fit could help with that and make your rides more enjoyable.

    During the bike fit, your bike position will probably be assessed, so you'll know what you might need to do differently.

    Even a small adjustment on your seat or handlebars can make a big difference.

    As for choosing which bike fit person to go with, it would be helpful if you could get a recommendation from someone (or several someones). The guy I used is the only guy I'm familiar with and know several people who have gone to him and like him. I don't know what the standard is for other bike fits, but he did a lot more than adjust my bike. Before adjusting it, he measured me in various ways. He had my lie down and checked my flexibility. I found out my right leg wasn't as flexible as my left, which was causing a lot of pain on long rides. He put the bike on a trainer with a computer hooked up, watched me pedal and told me what I needed to do to pedal more efficiently. He told me how to properly sit on the bike, to put more of my weight on the saddle than on the handlebars (which helps with neck and shoulder pain . . . but is hard to do!).

    After my bike fit, I was a new rider. Less pain and more speed. I highly recommend it.

    If you can't get a recommendation from someone, at least ask the three you are aware of what all is included in the fit. $400 is a lot to invest. Hopefully you'll get good feedback on the least expensive option. I think that's around what I paid, but I don't know what the going rates are around here . . . if it's cheaper than where you are.

    As for whether to do it now or wait, I'd say that's up to you. Since you are only riding recreationally and want to make the most of the 12 month period, maybe wait. But I think that's your call depending on how much more riding you think you'll do this season, etc.
    GO RIDE YOUR BIKE!!!

    2009 Cannondale Super Six High Modulus / SRAM Red / Selle San Marco Mantra

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    374
    Quote Originally Posted by Jiffer View Post
    I highly recommend a bike fit and I would be surprised if anyone here didn't. Even as a recreational rider, if you are having pain, a bike fit could help with that and make your rides more enjoyable.

    During the bike fit, your bike position will probably be assessed, so you'll know what you might need to do differently.

    Even a small adjustment on your seat or handlebars can make a big difference.

    As for choosing which bike fit person to go with, it would be helpful if you could get a recommendation from someone (or several someones). The guy I used is the only guy I'm familiar with and know several people who have gone to him and like him. I don't know what the standard is for other bike fits, but he did a lot more than adjust my bike. Before adjusting it, he measured me in various ways. He had my lie down and checked my flexibility. I found out my right leg wasn't as flexible as my left, which was causing a lot of pain on long rides. He put the bike on a trainer with a computer hooked up, watched me pedal and told me what I needed to do to pedal more efficiently. He told me how to properly sit on the bike, to put more of my weight on the saddle than on the handlebars (which helps with neck and shoulder pain . . . but is hard to do!).

    After my bike fit, I was a new rider. Less pain and more speed. I highly recommend it.

    If you can't get a recommendation from someone, at least ask the three you are aware of what all is included in the fit. $400 is a lot to invest. Hopefully you'll get good feedback on the least expensive option. I think that's around what I paid, but I don't know what the going rates are around here . . . if it's cheaper than where you are.

    As for whether to do it now or wait, I'd say that's up to you. Since you are only riding recreationally and want to make the most of the 12 month period, maybe wait. But I think that's your call depending on how much more riding you think you'll do this season, etc.
    Thanks for your reply! I'm leaning towards getting a bike fit because I think it will improve my position and performance and I can actually get more miles in the limited time I have. I'm leaning towards the guy in the first link because he is a member of my club (I don't know him but others so) and he is also a coach which means that he may be able to give me some pointers. As a total newb, I've learned everything from scouring the internet but have never had anyone actually see me ride or give me tips on how to improve. He is the cheapest of the 3. I guess I will be better off waiting until next Spring as I plan to ride in Sept and Oct but will most likely not ride much past then. Also, I think spending $400 on a real high tech bike fit when I'm only a recreational rider may be a waste.

    Appreciate the advice.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,446
    First one sounds like a winner! (Four hundred dollars? ).
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    374
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    First one sounds like a winner! (Four hundred dollars? ).
    I know! I almost fell out of my chair, most of the prices that I saw were exorbitant but everything in NYC is. I'm guessing that the people who spend that much are professional racers or are very serious cyclists. Even $200 seems like a lot but it's better than $400.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    4,713
    Yeah, my full fit (where the guy spent an hour fiddling with my cleat position alone...), plus insoles and a new stem came to something like $275. Yeah.

    Definitely get a fitting. It helps. Ask me how I know!
    At least I don't leave slime trails.
    http://wholecog.wordpress.com/

    2009 Giant Avail 3 |Specialized Jett 143

    2013 Charge Filter Apex| Specialized Jett 143
    1996(?) Giant Iguana 630|Specialized Riva


    Saving for the next one...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,952
    Quote Originally Posted by jyyanks View Post
    I know! I almost fell out of my chair, most of the prices that I saw were exorbitant but everything in NYC is. I'm guessing that the people who spend that much are professional racers or are very serious cyclists. Even $200 seems like a lot but it's better than $400.
    It depends what that amount is paying for. At my LBS, the "full" fitting is $300 BUT that is for the life of the bike. That means if there are further tweaks needed, you get new pedals or cleats and adjustments are needed, or if you change something on the bike that requires a refitting, etc. you don't need to pay another fitting fee. Ever, for the life of that bike. Of course you still pay for any parts/labor that are needed. They keep detailed notes on you and your bikes, which really helps if you wind up with pain at some point. If you purchase the bike at that shop then the full fitting is included in the purchase and you still get the life-time fit for free. Very nice and well worth it. It pays to ask what each level covers. I don't think there are may stores that offer a full fit quite like what I just described but it is worth finding out.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    San Antonio Heights, CA (Upland)
    Posts
    1,068
    Quote Originally Posted by jyyanks View Post
    Thanks for your reply! I'm leaning towards getting a bike fit because I think it will improve my position and performance and I can actually get more miles in the limited time I have. I'm leaning towards the guy in the first link because he is a member of my club (I don't know him but others so) and he is also a coach which means that he may be able to give me some pointers. As a total newb, I've learned everything from scouring the internet but have never had anyone actually see me ride or give me tips on how to improve. He is the cheapest of the 3. I guess I will be better off waiting until next Spring as I plan to ride in Sept and Oct but will most likely not ride much past then. Also, I think spending $400 on a real high tech bike fit when I'm only a recreational rider may be a waste.

    Appreciate the advice.
    My bike fit guy is a coach as well, which I think is one of the reasons why he does such a good job and might do "extra" stuff that others may not. I really have no idea what others do. If they're charging $200-$400 they BETTER be doing all that he does! He does have a couple of different price options for his fits, depending on how extensive he works with you. A friend of mine did a more basic fit for a cheaper price than I paid. Also, most bike shops will give you a "very basic" fit if you buy a bike from them. I'm sure the extent of the fit varies by LBS, but ours is very, very basic. All I know is what my bike fit guy did for me was well worth the money. I wanted a bike fit from the get go, but hubby made me put it off at first because of cost. Once I did my first 60-ish mile ride in prep for a century and was in so much pain, I decided I was done waiting. As I've said, it made such a big difference for me. I get why you are leaning toward waiting. I'm guessing either way would be fine. Once you get a fit, it's possible you may want to go back for an adjustment once, but I don't imagine you'd need more than that. If he's a good bike fit guy, you should be good to go. I do know that bike fit can change depending on your ability and style of riding. If you ever become a more aggressive rider, different adjustments to your bike might be helpful.
    GO RIDE YOUR BIKE!!!

    2009 Cannondale Super Six High Modulus / SRAM Red / Selle San Marco Mantra

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Columbus, IN
    Posts
    221
    I just bought a new bike -- and had an "intro" fitting. I've recently been injured and am recouperating from a broken leg so I'm not riding too much (and on an indoor trainer) but was miserable even on the trainer. The fitter changed the saddle and the stem and now its much better. He also adjusted the cleats slightly and now I'm having an easier time clipping out with my broken-but-almost-healed leg. The "intro" fitting was $75, which they comped since I purchased a new bike. I'd asked about having the more detailed fitting (which costs $200, but the purchase of the bike was worth a $75 discount), but the fitter said he thought it was a waste of time to do a detailed fitting now when I've been injured, have various weaknesses, and haven't been active and he says he practically guarantees he'll change more things in 6 months as my flexibility and strength improves. At least the saddle (i probably could have lived without a new stem and just been a bit crunched) was preventing me from spending any time on the bike so it was worth the time to get that fixed. Even the intro fitting included discussion about body position, etc. (although their website indicates this is part of the more detailed fitting). I think some of these guys just like biking/helping people so much they'll give you lots of information.

    Perhaps you can call and ask if they'll do just an minor fitting now, and a more detailed fitting later? Perhaps you can talk them into giving you a discount on the more detailed fitting later if you pay for an intro fitting now.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    374
    Quote Originally Posted by Aromig View Post
    I just bought a new bike -- and had an "intro" fitting. I've recently been injured and am recouperating from a broken leg so I'm not riding too much (and on an indoor trainer) but was miserable even on the trainer. The fitter changed the saddle and the stem and now its much better. He also adjusted the cleats slightly and now I'm having an easier time clipping out with my broken-but-almost-healed leg. The "intro" fitting was $75, which they comped since I purchased a new bike. I'd asked about having the more detailed fitting (which costs $200, but the purchase of the bike was worth a $75 discount), but the fitter said he thought it was a waste of time to do a detailed fitting now when I've been injured, have various weaknesses, and haven't been active and he says he practically guarantees he'll change more things in 6 months as my flexibility and strength improves. At least the saddle (i probably could have lived without a new stem and just been a bit crunched) was preventing me from spending any time on the bike so it was worth the time to get that fixed. Even the intro fitting included discussion about body position, etc. (although their website indicates this is part of the more detailed fitting). I think some of these guys just like biking/helping people so much they'll give you lots of information.

    Perhaps you can call and ask if they'll do just an minor fitting now, and a more detailed fitting later? Perhaps you can talk them into giving you a discount on the more detailed fitting later if you pay for an intro fitting now.
    Thanks Aromig! I never thought of asking him and probably should send him a quick email. The people who know him say he's great and he's helped them tremendously so it won't hurt to ask. Hope your leg heals quickly so you can go out and start enjoying your rides again!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    64
    If you've only had your Ruby for 7 months, did the bike shop not fit it to you then? And, if so, can you go back to them and talk about your issues and see if they can make tweaks to it before you spend additional money on a fitting elsewhere (although, don't get me wrong - I am ALL in favor of having a great bike fit). When I bought my bike last November, my LBS guy spent probably 2+ hours with me, making sure it fit me properly and they offer that 'free' fitting for all bikes purchased there over a certain $ amount (less expensive bikes, they do charge for it, but it's worth it).

    I don't think the prices you are talking about are out of line for NYC area, but I'd sure see if I couldn't go back to my shop and work through my issues first (and, hopefully, for free if they fit you to begin with).

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    central NY
    Posts
    406
    I'm going for a fitting tomorrow. I didn't even ask how much it would be, thinking it was about $100-$150. Uh-oh Well, at least I'll be ready. I chose a fitter recommended by a physical therapist/sport coach I'll be seeing soon. It's a small shop with only a couple of brands (no Trek) and I'm concerned if I do need/want a new bike, I won't be able to take advantage of the purchase discount from getting a fitting. Hopefully my old bike just needs tweaking.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    4
    Hi there. I am new here.
    I have a plan to buy a bike. Hope i will get all the related supportive advice from here.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,446
    Yes. Preferably, the shop will size you, recommend bikes to try, and then give you a thorough fitting with the bike. That's ideal. Ideal doesn't always happen.

    What kind of riding do you want to do? Any particular bike or types of bike in mind?
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4
    Yes, it's crazy expensive, but you'll find that it's so beneficial you will wish you did it sooner!

 

 

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