Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,054

    Runners - New Runner Needs Advice

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    Just finished the C25K today. But am I slow, 15 min miles. Whats the best way to improve my speed? I appreciate any advice/feedback. Thank you
    2011 Specialized Secteur Elite Comp
    2006 Trek 7100

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    1,942
    Is this "lung" speed or "leg" speed, if that makes sense? Though it can be hard to tell as a beginning runner...

    "I never met a donut I didn't like" - Dave Wiens

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,054
    I think its a little of both, probably more lung.
    2011 Specialized Secteur Elite Comp
    2006 Trek 7100

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    1,942
    I'm finding lung speed harder to improve, though, like on a bike, it seems to be improving by suffering through intervals/speedwork, hills, and just pushing when my mind says no. Really learning to relax can help - occasionally while you're running, shrug your shoulders up to your ears and then let them flop. And if someone can watch you, have them see if you're leaning forward or sticking your chest out - slight problems with posture tend to be greatly exaggerated while running (when I get tired, I slouch really badly and then - tada! - can't breathe).

    For legs - and maybe partly for lungs - most beginner runners overstride, which seems like it would be efficient (larger steps, right?) but uses lots more energy. The correct stride, as I've heard it described, should never allow you to see your feet, since they should be landing directly beneath your knee. If they're in front of the knee, you temporarily stop and then re-start forward momentum with every stride. Tweaking stride efficiency has helped me immensely in the last year but I'm still struggling mightily when my lungs can't keep up.

    Edit - one more thing: turnover/cadence. Theoretically, we're most efficient at about 180 steps per minute, though it can vary person to person. A side effect of overstriding (or learning to run while overstriding) is a slower leg turnover, which also essentially means you're hitting the brakes every step. So think shorter, quicker steps. Your legs might take awhile to get used to that but it will eventually make it easier to go faster.
    Last edited by jessmarimba; 08-18-2012 at 06:55 PM. Reason: brain fried

    "I never met a donut I didn't like" - Dave Wiens

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,498
    I think if you can run comfortably at 15mm, your form is likely to be very good. The trick is not changing your form when you gain speed. Like anything else, try running intervals, fewer and shorter than what you think you can. Lean forward a little farther at the ankle - NOT at the waist. Open your stride up a little longer behind you - NOT in front. You should feel it in your obliques.

    Didn't you say you used to run track when you were younger? I'm betting you find it again sooner than later.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,054
    Thanks everyone for all the advice. I ran back in the 80's(about 50 mpw) - just ran for fitness and fun. This is what I was going to try. Since I can run 32 minutes, a couple of times a week, run a shorter distance/time(maybe something like 20-25 mins) and 2 days run the 32 mins, then 1 day increase to 35 mins, then increase the next week so my 32 mins run would be 35 mins and then gradually increase my time/distance. What do you think about this plan?
    2011 Specialized Secteur Elite Comp
    2006 Trek 7100

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    1,942
    Sounds good to me!

    Might consider the Galloway method, too. It incorporates walk breaks even up to longer distances and I found it a huge help when my lungs were taking longer to cooperate. Switched to that when I moved to Colorado and took a couple years to eliminate walk breaks entirely (or mostly) for long runs.

    "I never met a donut I didn't like" - Dave Wiens

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1,414
    If you are running fairly low mileage currently (and I think this generally applies for most people who are running slower than about 9:30 miles also) you will get faster, and often surprisingly so, just by adding mileage. After a eight weeks of 25-40 mpw, for instance, you will almost certainly be considerably faster than when you started, and I think this comes well before you even start to think about speedwork/intervals/etc. You just want to be careful not to do too much too soon -- be patient and have faith that if you put the miles in, you'll get faster.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •