Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 47
  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    33

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by indysteel View Post
    Have you ever had a fitting? Sometimes you can remedy having too much weight in your upper body by moving the saddle back. I know it may seem counterintuitive but it's worth a shot.
    Lots of fittings. Three this past spring. Couldn't get it right. Maybe it's not fixable?

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Saskatoon, Sask.
    Posts
    334
    Quote Originally Posted by Owlie View Post
    A CX bike with rack mounts is probably a good do-anything bike.
    ...
    There are lots of 'cross bikes on the market. Check out the Kona Jake, Rocky Mountain CRX, Ridley Crossbow... no doubt there are many others. Generally, the lowest priced model in the lineup will be the versatile one with the rack and fender eyelets.
    My husband rode his Rocky Mountain for two years, then sold it to a young woman who wanted to do triathlons on it. She figured on using it with the fat tires for most of the training (the roads are really bad here) and then putting skinny road tires on for racing day. (DH still has a 'cross bike, now a Ridley Crossbow).
    Queen of the sea beasts

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    6,043
    Quote Originally Posted by snyderd25 View Post
    Lots of fittings. Three this past spring. Couldn't get it right. Maybe it's not fixable?
    Oh, that's a shame. If after three fittings, it still isn't comfortable, then I'd say either the bike just isn't for you or that you have a physical issue that is causing your pain. I'd be hesitant to buy a new bike without the input of a fitter. Is is that your hands hurt?
    Live with intention. Walk to the edge. Listen hard. Practice wellness. Play with abandon. Laugh. Choose with no regret. Continue to learn. Appreciate your friends. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is.

    --Mary Anne Radmacher

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,501
    I think she said elbow tendinitis. Gripping the bars too tightly is what I'd suspect ... that might be a fit issue directly with bars the wrong width or bend, or it might be an indirect thing where she's hanging on for dear life because the bike feels squirrelly, or it might just be a bad habit.

    snyderd, what's your preferred hand position? Do you change positions now and then during your rides (hoods, drops, tops if there's room)? Do you shake your arms and hands out periodically? Do you notice yourself (or did your fitter notice you) gripping too tightly? You said three fittings, but how many different handlebars did you try?
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    9,324
    Quote Originally Posted by Sky King View Post
    Like Veronica, I am totally spoiled with my Rivendell. She is a fabulous do everything bike for me.

    I've since moved on to two other bikes - a Rivendell Legolas and a Cervelo S3. The Legolas could certainly handle light self supported touring and maybe I could even tow with it. The Cervelo... not so much.

    But my riding focus has changed greatly since I started riding.

    Veronica
    Discipline is remembering what you want.


    TandemHearts.com

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    33
    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    ..... One Bike to rule them all, and in the darkness bind them ...


    Sorry. I really tried to resist. I really did.
    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    I think she said elbow tendinitis. Gripping the bars too tightly is what I'd suspect ... that might be a fit issue directly with bars the wrong width or bend, or it might be an indirect thing where she's hanging on for dear life because the bike feels squirrelly, or it might just be a bad habit.

    snyderd, what's your preferred hand position? Do you change positions now and then during your rides (hoods, drops, tops if there's room)? Do you shake your arms and hands out periodically? Do you notice yourself (or did your fitter notice you) gripping too tightly? You said three fittings, but how many different handlebars did you try?

    I ended up with both tennis and golfers elbow in both elbows while training for century ride this spring. That's why I thought the relaxed fit of the casserole might work out. I definitely grip too tight, but I also put a lot of weight on upper body. I suggested changing handlebars but the fitters ( i tried two) didn't want to. We changed seat post and 3 diff stems. I do move hands a bit, mostly from hoods to straight in front. I rarely use drops. I am unable to stand and pedal in this bike ( not sure if that's fit issue). I def shake out hands and arms and stretch along he way.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,708
    Cyclocross bikes rock. Love, love, love mine.

    It's just a cheap no brand name internet special. But the geometry was within one cm of my Orbea carbon roadie (input of two fitters). So I knew I was good to go in ordering it on my own.

    Sorry to hear about your pain issues. I've had my share of pain as well. One source of which was my ill fitting first road bike (two frame sizes too big, sold to by a lbs, not associated with the other two fitters).

    I know for me it seems my physical fittness plays a role in how much pressure I put on my hands. When I am lighter, stronger, I notice less in my hands.

    Good Luck!

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Madison WI
    Posts
    280
    Bianchi volpe is another option. I couldn't find any casseroles in Wisconsin when I went looking last week. I currently considering building a soma double cross

    I'll still keep my road bike but this should work for everything else (rail trails, around town, future touring)
    Alison - mama of 2 (8yo and 6yo)
    2009 Independent Fabrication steel Crown Jewel SE
    1995 trek 800 steel MTV

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    western Colorado
    Posts
    442
    I have a Gunnar Sport also. Mine is tiny, 41cm. It was a custom geometry frame. Dreamy ride, but still a road bike.

    The Cross Check is certainly a great do it all bike, especially if you want all the tire clearance it offers. I have a Motobecane Fantom CXX (from bikesdirect . com) that is basically the same frame as the Cross Check. The 42cm size fit me just fine.

    The Surly Pacer, the road bike frame, is also very nice. Not as light and fast as most road bikes, but extremely comfy and bombproof. I'd light tour on a bike like that.

    What size bike are you looking at? What is your budget?
    Specialized Ruby
    Gunnar Sport
    Salsa Vaya Ti
    Novara Randonee x2
    Motobecane Fantom CXX (Surly Crosscheck)
    Jamis Dragon

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    63
    CX bike all the way. Picked up a Specialized Crux Expert Force...love it. Throw the knobbies on for dirt training and the slicks for the road. Did a Century on it a few weeks ago and was supper comfortable the whole ride. I race around with the guys on some spirited rides with paces getting up to 24mph and really looking forward to being able to ride year round on it. I think it's the do it all bike. Pretty good in the weight department as well. The only thing to think about is if you are willing to maybe pick up an extra wheelset for slicks or possibly switch the chainring out. I wasn't too fond of the set up on mine and switched to a 50/34. I am 5'4" and fit perfectly on the 52cm Crux and I have a bad back which hasn't caused too many issues with the more upright sitting on the Crux. So yeah...CX all the way for the all around bike IMO.
    Felt F65
    Specialized Crux Expert Force (My baby)

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,501
    ... may I ask which level(s) your back issue is at?

    My PT has suggested that if I ever get back on a bike at all, I'll need to ditch the road bike. I've got issues at multiple levels, but the one that really gets nailed on the road bike is L3-4. I'm still skeptical that anything shy of a unicycle would let me ride in perfectly neutral spine regardless of terrain ... but I'd like to hear your experience.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    ... may I ask which level(s) your back issue is at?

    My PT has suggested that if I ever get back on a bike at all, I'll need to ditch the road bike. I've got issues at multiple levels, but the one that really gets nailed on the road bike is L3-4. I'm still skeptical that anything shy of a unicycle would let me ride in perfectly neutral spine regardless of terrain ... but I'd like to hear your experience.
    My back is all out of whack. 50% of my T9 vertebrae is gone and then mild compression at T7, T8, T10, T11 and T12. Severe joint deformity in T9-T11. Disc deformity and compression all through my Thoracic as well. Everything that is going on in my Thoracic spine though has an effect on the rest of my spine. My lower back continues to try to compensate for the Thoracic and then the muscles and ligaments are constantly fighting to keep or try to pull my back back into it's natural alignment which it will never be in given the Kyphosis with half of T9 being gone. I have chronic pain every day but 75% of it was relieved with nerve ablation. Now it's just the residual pain from other nerves, joints, ligaments and muscles that are still lingering but not as severe.

    The one thing my doctor said to me was to continue cycling if I can deal with the pain that I might have. He said sitting around doing nothing will only make the pain worse and affect my overall health and mental well being. I am only 33 and he knows I am a very active individual so he looks at the overall picture. I won't be doing any more damage cycling unless I crash and have a harsh force on my spine. The pain now is just nerves, muscles and ligaments getting aggrevated from the activity. So if I can deal with that aggrevation/pain then no need to stop cycling. I have noticed that my back has strengthed up and the pain takes longer to set in. I try to stretch before, during and after riding. So do I ride pain free? No. My pain is less/takes longer to set in on the CX bike because I sit more upright. On my Felt I can only last 15 minutes before back pain sets in.

    So sorry you having to deal with back pain as well. I hope it gets better for you. I think I am just to the point that it's such an every day thing that it's just now a part of life.
    Felt F65
    Specialized Crux Expert Force (My baby)

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,501
    Oh man kj, so sorry you're having to deal with all that.

    In a crazy way it's actually reassuring to me though. What I'm most terrified of is the nerve compression getting into the motor nerves. I can deal with the numbness and there's only a little bit of pain in my back and legs (my arms are another story, but I really think most of that's from the thoracic outlet, not the spinal nerves). But I obviously don't want to risk losing the use of my legs. If you can continue to be active and d*mn the torpedoes/pain/numbness, then maybe I'll be able to as well.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    4,632
    Quote Originally Posted by kamikazejane View Post
    CX bike all the way. Picked up a Specialized Crux Expert Force...love it. Throw the knobbies on for dirt training and the slicks for the road. Did a Century on it a few weeks ago and was supper comfortable the whole ride. I race around with the guys on some spirited rides with paces getting up to 24mph and really looking forward to being able to ride year round on it. I think it's the do it all bike. Pretty good in the weight department as well. The only thing to think about is if you are willing to maybe pick up an extra wheelset for slicks or possibly switch the chainring out. I wasn't too fond of the set up on mine and switched to a 50/34. I am 5'4" and fit perfectly on the 52cm Crux and I have a bad back which hasn't caused too many issues with the more upright sitting on the Crux. So yeah...CX all the way for the all around bike IMO.
    Do you have a long torso? I'm 3" taller than you and would ride the same size! Can it take a rack? I really like the Surly Cross-check, but I don't think I can ride one, since the top tubes are LONG. There's a shortage of WSD CX bikes out there, and I need a relatively short top tube, so the Crux/Tricross might be the best bet for me.
    At least I don't leave slime trails.
    http://wholecog.wordpress.com/

    2009 Giant Avail 3 |Specialized Jett 143

    2013 Charge Filter Apex| Specialized Jett 143
    1996(?) Giant Iguana 630|Specialized Riva


    Saving for the next one...

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by Owlie View Post
    Do you have a long torso? I'm 3" taller than you and would ride the same size! Can it take a rack? I really like the Surly Cross-check, but I don't think I can ride one, since the top tubes are LONG. There's a shortage of WSD CX bikes out there, and I need a relatively short top tube, so the Crux/Tricross might be the best bet for me.
    I am a little longer in the legs than torso. The top tube isn't long on the 52 cm Crux at all. It measures about the same as a 51cm WSD Specialized road bike from what I recall when I was getting fitted for possibly a new Amira. And then the handlebar stem has a nice raised angle as well. I am not sure about the rack but I am sure it can work. I think Specialized is coming out with a more WSD CX bike for 2013. I havn't seen it yet but I think I read it on bikeradar.com or something. I havn't had any problems with the throw in shifting or reaching for the brakes and I have small hands. The cranks they use on the Crux Force are the same they put on the WSD road bikes so it's pretty female friendly straight off the bat. Overall, I can't say enough positive things about the bike. I know I saw some brand new ones on ebay over the past month if you are looking to save a few pennies.
    Felt F65
    Specialized Crux Expert Force (My baby)

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •