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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Southeastern MA
    Posts
    222

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    Quote Originally Posted by tulip View Post
    I get that the idea of a wet exit is scary. It was for me, too. I would suggest taking a safety course and learning to wet exit and a few rescue techniques. Practice them in a controlled environment so that you are comfortable with how to do it. Then go back every year for a refresher course. Kayaking, like cycling, has risks and being prepared is alot more fun than being caught off guard.

    There's wonderful paddling in your area. Enjoy it!
    Sound advice from Tulip (as always!) When I took kayak lessons with a small group of women, nobody *wanted* to be the first to flip their boat on purpose to practice a wet exit. Yours truly finally bit the bullet-if only to get through it. I don't like being underwater, and get disoriented when I'm upside down (hated tumbling in school) so I had a few personal concerns. In addition, I was quite overweight at the time and struggled to get back in the boat- but eventually managed it.

    Frankly I still would prefer not to, but once you've done it a couple times, it helps you gain a little confidence. You will know what to expect instead of having that nagging fear of the unknown.

    1990 Univega Alpina/(stock) gel saddle
    2009 Specialized Dolce Elite/BG Lithia saddle
    2009 Jamis Coda Sport/Selle Royale Respiro saddle
    2010 Jamis Aurora/Jamis Touring Sport saddle

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    central Idaho mountains
    Posts
    53
    Well, how was it? I want to hear all about it as I will be going for my first time later this week. Always one to put the cart before the horse, I've been anticipating that I'll love it and should buy one!
    Shelley, Great Grandma Beginner
    1991 Specialized Hard Rock
    2012 Trek Superfly100 AL Elite

    Occasional blogging at: My Mountain Home

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,056
    I'm in the market for a new kayak. DGF has a 14 ft Necky Looksha with a rudder, the one I have is a Old Town Guide 10 ft - from a big box store, I haven't had it that many years, buy I hate the thing its like a tank and doesn't track well. I found a Necky Manitou 14 ft with a skeg, thats clearanced price. I always research things too much, way too much, that I then become confused after reading all the reviews, etc.... I do know I want a sit in kayak.
    2011 Specialized Secteur Elite Comp
    2006 Trek 7100

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Southeastern MA
    Posts
    222
    I have a Manitou (no skeg) and have been very happy with the handling. Like bikes, one could go crazy researching kayaks and hunting them down for a test paddle.'

    1990 Univega Alpina/(stock) gel saddle
    2009 Specialized Dolce Elite/BG Lithia saddle
    2009 Jamis Coda Sport/Selle Royale Respiro saddle
    2010 Jamis Aurora/Jamis Touring Sport saddle

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    central Idaho mountains
    Posts
    53
    I just got a Point 65 Martini. It detaches into two pieces so it can fit in the back of a car. Only takes a second to do and undo the straps. Forward and rear dry hatches, foot pedal rudder control, and very stable. Love it I ordered it from iMarineUSA, free shipping and it arrived in 3 days!

    If you want you can add a middle section for a tandem, or however many middle sections you want.
    Shelley, Great Grandma Beginner
    1991 Specialized Hard Rock
    2012 Trek Superfly100 AL Elite

    Occasional blogging at: My Mountain Home

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    IL/FL
    Posts
    3,856
    Had a new kayaking experience a few days ago in the Keys... Paddling along in a boat channel near the mangroves, we encountered several HUGE manatees. We stopped paddling and sat there with them for the longest time, they were so cool! When we started to paddle off, they followed us for about a half mile.

    Electra Townie 7D

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,336
    I went on a kayak for the first time last Saturday myself. I, too, have had a nearly life-long fear but for me it's with watercraft. I had a scarring experience when I was 6 on a deep-water fishing boat and since then had a healthy hatred for all things that floated on water.

    I'm a whole lot better than I used to be, so I was surprised that I actually wanted to go in a kayak. We stayed at a resort that was nestled in a sheltered cove and they had kayaks for the guests. The scenery was breathtaking, and it was awesome to see a seal bobbing not 4 feet away checking us out. I really enjoyed it and would love to do it again.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dorset, England, UK
    Posts
    1,037
    We had a Sevylor inflatable canoe for about 6 years but did not use it much, too much hassle but managed to sell it on ebay without much financial loss!

    Six weeks ago we decided to buy 2 x one-man sit-on kayaks, OMG absolutely brilliant.

    We bought the Emotion Temptation, for us they are faultless.

    Despite being a bit of an old biddy, I can manage to help lift them on top of our car.

    Next I want to experiment with falling out and seeing if I could turn the kayak right way up again and then see how much of a fool of myself I might make by trying to climb back on!!! Mind you, for this I will want full sun and a very hot day.





    PS Best of all I discovered today that paddling a kayak helps diminish batwings! :-)
    Last edited by ClockworkOrange; 08-12-2012 at 12:41 PM.
    Clock

    Orange Clockwork - Limited Edition 1998


    ‘Enjoy your victories of each day'

  9. #39
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,775
    <big bump>

    I've been wanting to try flat water kayaking for a while, like a few years now. The other day I got an email from REI about local events. Usually I just delete those emails but this time I read it, clicked some links... long story short I've registered for a beginning kayak class. It's still a few weeks away. So here I am looking for advice on what to expect, what to wear, etc. No surprise, there's some great info here and in related threads.

    I've gone canoeing before with family, on lakes. Never tried kayaking though. Should be fun!

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    4,389
    Quote Originally Posted by ny biker View Post
    <big bump>

    I've been wanting to try flat water kayaking for a while, like a few years now. The other day I got an email from REI about local events. Usually I just delete those emails but this time I read it, clicked some links... long story short I've registered for a beginning kayak class. It's still a few weeks away. So here I am looking for advice on what to expect, what to wear, etc. No surprise, there's some great info here and in related threads.

    I've gone canoeing before with family, on lakes. Never tried kayaking though. Should be fun!

    It should be great fun- I took the self rescue class up here and it was a good experience. A beginning class probably won't get into falling out and reentry - so I wouldn't worry about getting wet intentionally. They'll most likely teach you how to get in and out either from shore or from a dock, depending on where the class is, how to paddle forwards, backwards and turn and talk about what you'll need to buy if you decide to take up paddling.

    The gear list they provide on the class page is pretty comprehensive. Since it's been in the 90's where you are at, I wouldn't worry about getting too cold unless the class is late enough to run after sunset. Regular old shorts and a tee should be just fine. The things I would stress are sun protection - it actually gets quite hot out on the water and there's lots of sun reflected off of the surface. You'll absolutely want a hat with a good brim, sunglasses and sunscreen - and don't neglect places that you might not normally think about - like the underside of your chin. Unless you launch from a dock, footwear that can get wet is a must too- it can be quite uncomfortable to walk around on rocky or mucky lake shores in bare feet. If you have your own flotation jacket you probably want to bring it - they definitely will have them, but they may not be the most comfortable or best fitting models.

    The only other advice I have to offer that they don't cover is make sure anything you don't want to lose is in a zippered pocket, tethered to you in some manner or can float on it's own- just in case - and of course if it can't get wet put it in a plastic zipper bag.
    Last edited by Eden; 08-04-2017 at 06:55 AM.
    "Sharing the road means getting along, not getting ahead" - 1994 Washington State Driver's Guide

    visit my flickr stream http://flic.kr/ps/MMu5N

  11. #41
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,775
    Thanks Eden. I went to an in-store intro class at REI last week, which gave a good overview of different types of boats as well as related gear. Even if I love it, it won't be practical for me to buy a kayak anytime soon, but I could see investing in a good paddle and life jacket. Anyway after the class I bought a dry bag and zip-top bag for my phone. I also ordered a couple of long-sleeved swim shirts from LL Bean. Last summer I spent a lot of time looking for a new swimsuit that didn't look tragic on me, and found a tankini, a flippy little swim skirt and a pair of swim shorts. If at least one of the new swim shirts fits me, I'll have good options for hot or warm weather. I already have a pair of water shoes and a good lightweight baseball cap with a good visor. I'll dig out an old pair of cycling gloves for my hands.

    Two things still to figure out -- I usually wear contact lenses. I don't expect to end up in the water during the intro class, but would like to be prepared just in case. (I am not the most coordinated person, and might end up moving the wrong way or otherwise doing something dumb that gets me soaked.) So I'm thinking of investing in a pair of tinted swim goggles. Otherwise I would wear my prescription sunglasses with Croakies to keep them from falling off.

    The other thing I'm wondering is about drinks. I have plenty of water bottles, but am wondering if I need a bottle that could attach to the boat... if there is such a thing.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    IL/FL
    Posts
    3,856
    Swim goggles would get pretty uncomfortable after a bit, I paddle with my prescription sunglasses and croakies, work just fine even when I've had an oops.

    Everything is attached when I paddle, unless it floats. A nalgene bottle floats nicely, my metal kanteen not so much, so it gets a carabiner in the loop and attached with a small piece of paracord.

    Electra Townie 7D

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    4,389
    I wear my prescription sunglasses with a strap that has some little floaties on the string so that even if they come off of my face I won't lose them. I usually just take a regular water bottle and stick it in my lap. The cycling gloves are an excellent idea - I often forget them and it's easy to get blisters from the paddle. I'm thinking I should get some un-padded ones someday, but bike gloves work fine. Oh- and buy a whistle - I believe it's required equipment when boating, they are cheap and you stick it in your mouth, so it's nice to have your own. Make sure you get a marine/outdoors one rather than a coach's whistle - some kinds won't work when wet.

    I've only been unintentionally dumped into the water once... it was from a big boat wake that hit me just right to dump me over. On calm water it's easier to keep balanced than you think it will be.
    Last edited by Eden; 08-13-2017 at 12:11 AM.
    "Sharing the road means getting along, not getting ahead" - 1994 Washington State Driver's Guide

    visit my flickr stream http://flic.kr/ps/MMu5N

 

 

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