Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Wilts, UK
    Posts
    903

    Rookie flat question

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    I've done a first dry run of taking out and replacing the front inner tube. It went ok, I think, although it took ages and several viewings of videos and reading of threads on here. Here's my question - assuming that you're fixing a puncture or replacing a tube whilst out on a ride - do you turn the bike upside-down or just lay it on its side? The one that I did in my garage was with the bike upside-down but it's such hard work trying to flip it over without clanging anything on the handlebar. Thank you
    Dawes Cambridge Mixte, Specialized Hardrock, Specialized Vita.

    mixedbabygreens My blog, which really isn't all about the bike.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    Definitely on its side, derailleur side up, for just that reason. Even if you don't have a computer, bell, etc., you don't want to risk damaging the cables.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Wilts, UK
    Posts
    903
    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    Definitely on its side, derailleur side up, for just that reason. Even if you don't have a computer, bell, etc., you don't want to risk damaging the cables.
    Thank you!
    Dawes Cambridge Mixte, Specialized Hardrock, Specialized Vita.

    mixedbabygreens My blog, which really isn't all about the bike.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,856
    For a front wheel, I might put the bike on its side, but for a rear wheel change I find it easier to get the wheel on and off with the bike upside-down. But then I generally don't have trouble turning the bike upside-down -- that's also how I clean and lube the chain.

    If you do have it upside-down, make sure you get anything you need out of the bike bag(s) while it's still upright.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    Actually, for either wheel, it's much easier to take it off with the bike upright, supporting the seat stay or seatpost (for the rear wheel) or the handlebars/stem (for the front wheel) with your other hand, then lay the bike down on its side after the wheel is off. With the bike upright, the rim stays aligned in the brakes, the quick-release stays aligned in the dropouts, and (for the rear wheel) the chain stays aligned in the derailleur and the cassette. Once you turn the bike any way except the way that it's supposed to be ridden, everything gets off kilter and it's much harder to lift the wheel out cleanly.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,617
    ... and I find it's much easier to do upside down and for me, LESS chance of anything being off kilter. I count on gravity to drop the wheel evenly into the dropouts without worrying about the weight of the bike leaning over and making it wonky. It's difficult with aerobars and computer, but for me, the easiest way to do it, although I can do it both ways, and usually don't bother flipping for the front wheel.

    To each, his own...
    For 3 days, I get to part of a thousand other journeys.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Katy, Texas
    Posts
    1,828
    I do mine upside down for the simple reason that it is easier, altho backwards but then I am a closet lefty so..... I don't worry about bumping things too much since my bike is light enough for me to swing out and turn over without bumping the garmin and computer which are on the aero bars and are protected by the bend in the aero bars. When it is upside down it rests on the tips of the aero bars and the seat.

    I have a hard time remembering to take the stuff out of the seat bag before flipping it though, Fortunately, the whole bag comes off easily upside down.

    marni
    marni
    Katy, Texas
    Trek Madone 6.5- "Red"
    Trek Pilot 5.2- " Bebe"


    "easily outrun by a chihuahua."

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,144
    I would never put my bike upside down. I hold it up by the seat or seat tube to get the rear wheel out. Then, I lay it on the left side while I am working on the tire.
    Besides putting pressure/damaging the bars and other stuff, when the bike is upside down, everything I have to do and look at is backwards, which for me is death. My visual perception and ability to remember what to do is limited at best, and I need things to be exactly the same every time!
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Wilts, UK
    Posts
    903
    Quote Originally Posted by Pedal Wench View Post
    ... <polite snip>
    To each, his own...
    Indeed! My spatial perception is not very good at all, so I think I'd do better with the bike the right way up. There's certainly less scope for collateral damage.

    Thank you for all the replies
    Dawes Cambridge Mixte, Specialized Hardrock, Specialized Vita.

    mixedbabygreens My blog, which really isn't all about the bike.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •