Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 17
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    21

    How to get my dog used to my bike

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    Hi! I just bought a bike today after doing a lot of research about modern bikes. I'm 50 and haven't ridden a bike in 35 years - the last bike I had was a 10 speed.

    Because I just want a bike for commuting 6 miles to work (eventually) and running errands, I ended up buying a 2012 Woman's Trek Allant. I'm not really sure how many gears it has. 7 on one side and 3 on the other? (May I digress for a moment to say "Hurrah!" for shifting gears? It's much easier than I remember it being. I enjoyed my test run - shaky as I was after such a long absence. Now if I only understood what I was doing.)

    I've lost 85 pounds this year just by changing my diet a bit and by walking my little 15 lb dachshund mix every day, but I've hit a nasty set-point that I hope cycling will help me get over. I'd like to eventually let my dog run along side me (I'm very close to a neighborhood that gets virtually no traffic - I could even use the sidewalk if need be.) Does anyone have any advice for me to help him not be afraid of the bike? I'm going to keep it in the house after I pick it up on Monday.

    I'm hoping to get a dog trailer later this spring so that I can take him to the dog park. Does anyone else do that? How does your dog react to the dog trailer?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    865
    I'd be careful about having a dog that small run alongside the bike. But then, if you can go very slow and be able to pay attention to the dog, it might be ok. I live in a place where folks would just as easily run me down in their cars, so I don't take my dog with me on my bike. We have a trailer,but I haven't tried to get him acclimated to it. It wouldn't do much for exercise for him, but he is a herding breed with very high energy. Have you ever heard of dog scootering? There is a company that makes a push scooter with big enough wheels to go over all sorts of terrain, and the dog runs out front on a leash with a bungee in it attached to the front of the scooter.


    Not all who wander are lost

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    perpetual traveler
    Posts
    1,267
    Quote Originally Posted by ann_w View Post
    I'm hoping to get a dog trailer later this spring so that I can take him to the dog park. Does anyone else do that? How does your dog react to the dog trailer?
    I bought a cheap used kids trailer for my bike, put a firm pillow in the bottom, and I take my elderly dachshund for rides. She seems to have mixed feelings about it. She loves getting in but sometimes she makes odd little noises as we ride. So, I think she is a bit anxious. She hasn't had that many rides yet and I am starting her out slow. I go a block or two, give her a treat, and go some more.

    Good luck!

    And congratulations on the weight loss!
    Trek Madone 4.7 WSD
    Cannondale Quick4
    1969 Schwinn Collegiate, original owner
    Terry Classic


    Richard Feynman: “The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool.”

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    21
    Yeah, I'm not wedded to the idea of having him run beside me (his size does give me pause on that notion - I may have to rethink it), but I sure would love to be able to take him to the fenced dog park so he could get a good run in! A friend of mine has a dog trailer she's willing to lend me, so this spring I'll give it a try.

    It won't be for a few months in either case - I don't know what I'm doing on a bike and need lots of practice first. I still need to figure out how the gears work! I pick up my bike tomorrow (I left it with them so they could put a back rack on and put on a basket in front), so hopefully the weather won't be as horrible as predicted and I can practice some. Otoh I live in Portland, Oregon so I should be used to the rain by now.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Bulgaria
    Posts
    270
    Hi, I don't have a dog and I don't know how it would be to ride with a dog but you can google "Bikejoring". I saw it and it looks interesting. But maybe first you have to master your bike skills without the dog. It's for your safety not to shake and be stable on the road.
    Good luck!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    On my bike
    Posts
    2,505
    Unless you're really slow, your dachsie won't be able to keep up. If you watch dogs running & playing, they'll go really fast, then stop & repeat. Not many breeds (herding breeds excepted) are made for running non-stop. Some sporting breeds seem to enjoy it - but in every case, I'd watch the surface they're running on (soft is better) and be mindful of skeletal issues.

    Regarding a trailer, I'd spend lots of time with him in it & NOT hooked up to your bike. Put treats, his blanket & toys in it - make it a good thing. When he is comfortable with it, I'd manually move it just a little & see how he reacts. Patience is good. I'd hope that when he's finally hooked up, you'd have a restraining harness so he can't jump out.
    To train a dog, you must be more interesting than dirt.

    Trek Project One
    Trek FX 7.4 Hybrid

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    Posts
    257
    Good replies. Rethink the dog running beside you. Dangerous for you and the dog. Depending on how your dog likes to be handled (or not) you might consider a basket, also handy for errands.
    In my case, I walk the dogs to the park and ride my bikes elsewhere without them...
    S

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    21
    The fenced park is a bit too far to walk him to, so right now he just gets about a 45 minute walk by leash. Hopefully the dog trailer will work out. He really loves to run up and down trails, when he gets the chance.

    I did get to ride my bike today - it was fun! And I know the important part of shifting gears now (1 is hills, 2 is most used, 3 is flat cruising, the other side with the 7 gears is tweaking). I just rode around my neighborhood, and realized how out of shape I am. A short ride left me with jittery legs! It's a good thing I got the bike now - by spring I should be good for normal, longer rides with friends. I wouldn't be able to do it now.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Arlington, VA
    Posts
    1,993
    Quote Originally Posted by sarahkonamojo View Post
    Good replies. Rethink the dog running beside you. Dangerous for you and the dog. Depending on how your dog likes to be handled (or not) you might consider a basket, also handy for errands.
    In my case, I walk the dogs to the park and ride my bikes elsewhere without them...
    S
    I agree. Go with the trailer.

    Luna Eclipse//Terry B'fly
    Luna Orbit//Sella Italia Ldy Gel Flow
    Bianchi Eros Donna//Terry Falcon
    Seven Alaris//Jett 143
    Terry Isis (Titanium)//Terry B'fly

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    102
    Hi

    I've bike with my dog running beside me loose, on a leash, on a mount attached to the bike and in a trailer. In addition, I have an all-terrain scooter which I attach my dog to using an X-back harness. My dog is a Vizsla - so plenty big enough & athletic enough to keep up with the bike.

    I know dachsie's aren't lap dogs - but I really think the dog is far far too small to keep up with even the slowest bike (although no doubt it will try its heart out!) I would invest in either a really good basket for the front (which has a cage over the top to stop the dog escaping - Rixen Kaul make very good ones) - or a dog trailer. Doggy Ride is excellent - I have the large size, but obviously the small size would be perfect. It also doubles as a great load carrier. I can't say my dog loves the trailer yet - but she is tied down pretty tight to stop her jumping out. She has her head out the top which works pretty well. It's a great way to take your dog with you and certainly turns heads (we cycle round the middle of London with her head poking out the top & ears flying in the wind!!) Another thought is to put your dog in a backpack. I have no experience of this - but there's a great video (maybe on YouTube) about a guy who describes exactly how to do it safely.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    perpetual traveler
    Posts
    1,267
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    Okay guys. Been doing this for four years. No problems. Not dangerous if done carefully.

    Anyone else actually done this?
    I used to ride many, many years ago with my big dog. The OP is talking about a little wiener dog with tiny short legs. I have the same kind of dog and in her younger years she could run around easily but keeping up with a bike just wouldn't have been possible. The trailer seems to be working for her though and I picked up a used one for less than fifty bucks. It is screened in so she can't jump out.
    Trek Madone 4.7 WSD
    Cannondale Quick4
    1969 Schwinn Collegiate, original owner
    Terry Classic


    Richard Feynman: “The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool.”

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    21
    Yeah, I'll probably just get a used trailer this spring so I can get him to the park. If he can get out and run around in the fenced area of the park that will accomplish the same thing as having run along side me, and it'll be more fun for him anyway.

    (Being a mix he does have longer legs and a slightly shorter back than a regular dachshund though, so running alongside the bike isn't quite as whacky as it sounds. But I'm nowhere near good enough to even try it now. I still have to practice just keeping me upright. Besides, one squirrel sighting and he'd be dragging me off the bike. )

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    On my bike
    Posts
    2,505
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    Okay guys. Been doing this for four years. No problems. Not dangerous if done carefully.

    Anyone else actually done this?
    Just like people, all dogs are different. Some dogs are not capable of running long distances without stopping. Most dogs have not had x-rays clearing them of any skeletal problems. Pounding for long distances can exacerbate arthritis. The dog may not show signs now, but a few years down the road it can take its toll. Many dogs won't display small amounts of pain if they are adrenalized by the prospect of running.
    To train a dog, you must be more interesting than dirt.

    Trek Project One
    Trek FX 7.4 Hybrid

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    865
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-1HC...layer_embedded

    this is a video about dog scootering.Hope the link works.


    Not all who wander are lost

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    21
    @beccaB: Now, if that were a team of a dozen or so Dachshunds, it would be impossibly cute!

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •