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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    112

    Carrying stuff with you on long rides

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    Hello

    How do you carry "stuff" on your longer rides?

    Right now I've got a fanny pack which holds my phone, a tiny tube of sunscreen (something I got at REI - zinc oxide - small, mostly for face I think), a breakfast bar, a few dollars, etc.

    It won't hold much else and for longer rides I think I'll need a banana and maybe peanut butter or something. Or just more of what I already have. Not to mention more sunscreen and something better suited for arms/legs than just the tiny tube of zinc oxide I have. Plus I have two water bottle cages and on the trail I can think of only one water fountain and it's near the beginning/end of my ride so not much help in refilling.

    What do you do?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    1,632
    A seat pack for a spare tube, levers, a patching kit, and very basic necessities (including ID, cell phone and keys), the jersey pockets for sunscreen and munchies. For a banana, I usually stop at a coffee place or convenience store or even gas station along the route.
    Last edited by pll; 08-02-2011 at 04:54 AM. Reason: Added link to seat packs on TE

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Flagstaff AZ
    Posts
    2,516
    Camelbacks are good for lots of water and carrying things. They have more pockets for carrying, and more water for water if you buy one large enough. I also use a small seat bag for tire levers, co2 cartridges, and a multitool.

    this plus three nice sized pockets in my jersey do it for me. That is one of my pet peeves of course with women's jerseys. Sometimes they don't have enough pockets or enough room in the pockets. Of course, I don't carry more sunscreen usually and a small one would work for me. I carry, extra jacket, (rain or warm), sometimes tights, since I live in the mountains and weather can change in a second, my tire changing stuff, with a tube in my back pocket or my camelback since tubes often get a hole in them in a small underseat bag from the zipper, extra food - a bar or two, and gels, a banana if I want, or pbj sammy, chapstick.

    That's about it as I recall

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    1,632
    Quote Originally Posted by spokewench View Post
    Camelbacks are good for lots of water and carrying things. They have more pockets for carrying, and more water for water if you buy one large enough. I also use a small seat bag for tire levers, co2 cartridges, and a multitool.

    this plus three nice sized pockets in my jersey do it for me. That is one of my pet peeves of course with women's jerseys. Sometimes they don't have enough pockets or enough room in the pockets. Of course, I don't carry more sunscreen usually and a small one would work for me. I carry, extra jacket, (rain or warm), sometimes tights, since I live in the mountains and weather can change in a second, my tire changing stuff, with a tube in my back pocket or my camelback since tubes often get a hole in them in a small underseat bag from the zipper, extra food - a bar or two, and gels, a banana if I want, or pbj sammy, chapstick.

    That's about it as I recall
    Have you noticed that some jerseys have very shallow pockets? It makes me mad! In the seat pack, I put my tube into a tight fitting zip lock bag. I've never had a hole made in a tube (yet, I guess!).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    6,043
    I use a relatively large seat bag, a top tube bag and my jersey pockets to hold what I need. Usually, I plan my routes to pass by a convenience store or gas station for extra provisions. This past weekend, DH and I did a route that we weren't sure had a store along the way, so we brought our Cambelbaks. Ouch. While I find it to be relatively comfortable on my mountain bike (and it's more upright position), I found it hard to wear by the end of our 45-mile ride. My low back was killing me. My guess is that I could get used to it, but I don't think I really want to use it for most rides.
    Live with intention. Walk to the edge. Listen hard. Practice wellness. Play with abandon. Laugh. Choose with no regret. Continue to learn. Appreciate your friends. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is.

    --Mary Anne Radmacher

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    I'm the only one allowed to whine
    Posts
    10,557
    Rack and pannier, baby!

    [Knot flexes arm muscles and does best Incredible Hulk impersonation]

    Actually, they aren't that heavy and the convenience of having a pannier more than makes up for any extra calories I have to burn to haul it along. I can carry other people's stuff for them, too.
    "If Americans want to live the American Dream, they should go to Denmark." - Richard Wilkinson

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    2,704
    Jersey pockets for food, phone, etc. and a small seat bag for flat repair stuff.

    For longer unsupported rides or any ride that requires easy camera access, I'll add my Mountain Feed Bag.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Southeastern MA
    Posts
    53

    Ditto what everyone says

    ...seat bag for tube and tools and cell phone and in this heat I have been wearing my running tanks instead of jerseys (don't have a sleeveless jersey yet) so I've been carrying a tiny drawstring nylon backpack. I freeze my second water bottle and throw that in there so my back doesn't get hot, and have my id and a snack in there. A shot blok or maybe one of those packed lunch-sized potato chips.

    I am trying to figure out how to squeeze another water bottle onto my road compact... do those cages with the velcro strap really stay on? What if I reinforce with zipties?
    2008 Giant FCR2 W
    2001 Giant Rincon SE

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    6,043
    Quote Originally Posted by GingerbreadGirl View Post
    ...seat bag for tube and tools and cell phone and in this heat I have been wearing my running tanks instead of jerseys (don't have a sleeveless jersey yet) so I've been carrying a tiny drawstring nylon backpack. I freeze my second water bottle and throw that in there so my back doesn't get hot, and have my id and a snack in there. A shot blok or maybe one of those packed lunch-sized potato chips.

    I am trying to figure out how to squeeze another water bottle onto my road compact... do those cages with the velcro strap really stay on? What if I reinforce with zipties?
    I assume you already have a cage on the seat tube. Will another cage not fit on the downtube? I have a Bontrager cage on my MTB's downtube that offers a "side entry." If a standard cage won't work, you might try something like that.
    Live with intention. Walk to the edge. Listen hard. Practice wellness. Play with abandon. Laugh. Choose with no regret. Continue to learn. Appreciate your friends. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is.

    --Mary Anne Radmacher

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Beautiful NW or Left Coast
    Posts
    5,619

    first you need a lightweight rack on the back of your bike. You can hold all sorts of things there, including panniers, booster seats, etc. And you can get a little bag that ties on the back of your seatpost as well.
    Another possibility is to get a little bag that hangs in front of your handlebars. Hm, I have all of that sutff.
    I like Bikes - Mimi
    Watercolor Blog

    Davidson Custom Bike - Cavaletta
    Dahon 2009 Sport - Luna
    Old Raleigh Mixte - Mitzi

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
    Posts
    6,984
    All my bikes have a permanent bike rack. I have 4 bikes.

    I carry a pannier...about 90% of the time. Whim sometimes takes me to store during a ride or I carry some raingear.

    It's the only way I can carry a U-lock, given my bike geometries.

    It's not a big deal to me..it's been this way since I returned to regular cycling 19 yrs. ago.

    And we live a car-free life. I do have to be prepared for...anything.

    I haul home toilet tissue, art supplies on top of rack, etc.
    My Personal blog on cycling & other favourite passions.
    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know what’s in a person’s heart.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Marin County CA
    Posts
    5,936
    Mimi you have a lot of baggage.



    (From someone with a lot of baggage.)
    Sarah

    When it's easy, ride hard; when it's hard, ride easy.


    2011 Volagi Liscio
    2010 Pegoretti Love #3 "Manovelo"
    2011 Mercian Vincitore Special
    2003 Eddy Merckx Team SC - stolen
    2001 Colnago Ovalmaster Stars and Stripes

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    4,632
    Large-ish seat bag for tubes, tools, tampon and emergency gel (and a few other things). My phone, wallet and food go in my jersey pockets, or Camelbak pockets if I'm using it.
    At least I don't leave slime trails.
    http://wholecog.wordpress.com/

    2009 Giant Avail 3 |Specialized Jett 143

    2013 Charge Filter Apex| Specialized Jett 143
    1996(?) Giant Iguana 630|Specialized Riva


    Saving for the next one...

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Between the Blue Ridge and the Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    5,203
    I have a under-seat bag for my tools, 2 tubes, a patch kit, spare Powerbar and a tube of Nuun for emergencies. And my epipen should I get stung by a bee.

    In my jersey pockets (I only buy jerseys with deep pockets), I carry a mini pump, phone, wallet and ICE information in a ziplock bag, and a Powerbar or two to eat.

    Sometimes I'll attach my bento box and put my cell phone in there, maybe along with some gels or chews or dried apricots in a ziploc bag. Depends on how far I'm going. 50+ miles I use the bento for extra food.

    I have two water bottles with G2. For rides longer than 30 miles, I make sure to pass by a convenience store to stock up on food and drink.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    98
    I struggle with this one. I have to take diabetes supplies (meter, strips, lancer) plus a cell phone, food for lows and tube and tools. I am thinking I will get a small pack on the top tube for my cell and meter and then my seat post bag can hold tools. I carry blocks or gel and starbursts in my pockets.

    I have always been an over packer!
    Last edited by RubyTuesday; 08-02-2011 at 08:03 AM.
    “Experience is simply the name we give our mistakes.”.
    ~Oscar Wilde

    Type One Diabetes
    currently using Medtronic MiniMed
    Revel 723 with CGMS

 

 

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