Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 21
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    10,889

    Camping question

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    I am preparing to tent camp for 2 nights at a women's mtn bike clinic, and I've never actually tent camped as an adult, only once in my life close to 40 years ago

    I've been told to just bring the minimum, I've friends going who are packing everything they can think of and if I forget something I can lean on them...but I would like not to have to do that overly much. I also have to keep my expenses to a bare mininum. I've also no idea what I am doing

    I have a tent/sleeping bag/air mattress taken care of. Friends who are loaning the tent are helping me to put it up.

    I have a cooler for ice, water, beer to share, fruit, munchies/nutrition for hiking/biking.

    Meeting friends for breakfast Saturday, just need to take care of food for Friday eve/Saturday lunch - all other meals will be taken care of at clinic (my session isn't until Sunday).

    There is a bath house close to the campground, and while I probably don't NEED to take water, I am taken three bottles (125 ounces each). First aid kit as well and will also pick up a folding chair.

    Any obvious omissions from this list? Probably silly not to have a rain poncho but I am going to be brave and not buy one

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,372
    NO, but there are things I would delete.
    Air mattress? A real one, or a camping one? I've known lots of people who use them on bike tours (when someone else is carrying the gear), but I wouldn't bother.
    A cooler? for what, do you really need that? Again, car camping or ease, sure, but if you will be moving around I wouldn't bother with it.
    Just me, simple is better.
    My mom always gets mad at me for bringing a tent!
    My photoblog
    http://dragons-fly-peacefully.blogspot.com/
    Bacchetta Giro (recumbent commuter)
    Bacchetta Corsa (recumbent "fast" bike)
    Greespeed X3 (recumbent "just for fun" trike)
    Strada Velomobile
    I will never buy another bike!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Hillsboro, OR
    Posts
    5,023
    bug repellent
    a small flashlight (in case you have to pee in the middle of the night)
    a mid-weight fleece jacket (good for warmth and makes a good pillow)
    lantern or headlamp (something that will provide light hands-free)


    I am assuming that you are driving to the site where you will camp, correct? If so, then a cooler is a good idea - otherwise, that's too much to carry! If you have a cooler, I'd probably just do pre-made salad or wraps or something for the missing meals because they are easy and don't need much preparation.
    My new non-farm blog: Finding Freedom

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Boise Idaho
    Posts
    1,162
    Your Ipod or other music source with headphones incase it is a noisy camp and you can't sleep, we never bike tour without them. I also am a fan of tylenol PM
    Sky King
    ____________________
    Gilles Berthoud "Bernard"
    Surly ECR "Eazi"
    Empowering the Bicycle Traveler
    biketouringnews.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Between the Blue Ridge and the Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    5,203
    towel, bug spray, flip-flops, soap (you can use regular soap on your hair in a pinch).

    pillow. I cannot sleep without a pillow.

    Enjoy the sounds of night and don't forget to look at the stars.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    6,034
    Two words: bug spray.

    You're otherwise covered. I usually bring some earplugs and some flip flops for the bathhouse. DH and I will have just about anything else you could need. We do not camp particularly light.
    Live with intention. Walk to the edge. Listen hard. Practice wellness. Play with abandon. Laugh. Choose with no regret. Continue to learn. Appreciate your friends. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is.

    --Mary Anne Radmacher

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,498
    Spare towel to wipe the dew/rain off your bike saddle in the morning.

    Bring a raincoat for when you're not riding. If you don't have a raincoat you're willing to camp in, even a garbage bag will help. When you're camping, once you or your things get wet, you will not dry off until you come home... Make sure you have something watertight for your stuff (garbage bag or storage-sized ziploc) in case your friend's tent leaks.

    +1 on bug spray.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    10,889
    Quote Originally Posted by GLC1968 View Post
    bug repellent
    a small flashlight (in case you have to pee in the middle of the night)
    a mid-weight fleece jacket (good for warmth and makes a good pillow)
    lantern or headlamp (something that will provide light hands-free)


    I am assuming that you are driving to the site where you will camp, correct? If so, then a cooler is a good idea - otherwise, that's too much to carry! If you have a cooler, I'd probably just do pre-made salad or wraps or something for the missing meals because they are easy and don't need much preparation.
    This sounds good - the clinic is at a state park and we are all camping together there - 3-4 campgrounds full of mountain bikers Yeah, I am a wimp, but I need that air mattress so I know I can sleep. I doubt my old bones and joints want to start sleeping on the hard ground now The cooler is for food and to have cold beer/ice for the Camelbak.

    Flashlight is good, hadn't thought of that. nor the flip-flops! There WILL be a late night trip to pee, especially if I drink beer

    I keep see-sawing on the foldable chair, but I don't want to count on there being a free picnic table...

    Thanks for all of the tips, I KNEW there were things I hadn't thought of. Thank you!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    6,034
    Quote Originally Posted by Catrin View Post
    This sounds good - the clinic is at a state park and we are all camping together there - 3-4 campgrounds full of mountain bikers Yeah, I am a wimp, but I need that air mattress so I know I can sleep. I doubt my old bones and joints want to start sleeping on the hard ground now The cooler is for food and to have cold beer/ice for the Camelbak.

    Flashlight is good, hadn't thought of that. nor the flip-flops! There WILL be a late night trip to pee, especially if I drink beer

    I keep see-sawing on the foldable chair, but I don't want to count on there being a free picnic table...

    Thanks for all of the tips, I KNEW there were things I hadn't thought of. Thank you!
    Definitely yes on the chair. At some point, you're going to want to sit by your tent or someone else's and relax.
    Live with intention. Walk to the edge. Listen hard. Practice wellness. Play with abandon. Laugh. Choose with no regret. Continue to learn. Appreciate your friends. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is.

    --Mary Anne Radmacher

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    4,066
    Yup, a double, or is it triple, on bug repellent, earbuds and light source.

    Also, I have no idea what kind of climate or elevation you're in, but camping and spending the entire day outdoors is a lot colder than being able to go indoors in the evening, so bring enough clothes. On climbing camping trips, even in midsummer, we often pack thick socks, a warm hat and a down jacket.

    I remember driving around on holiday trying to find a new climbing spot, and realizing we were there when we spotted people wearing down jackets at the local pizzeria, amongst all the locals in shorts
    Winter riding is much less about badassery and much more about bundle-uppery. - malkin

    1995 Kona Cinder Cone commuterFrankenbike/Selle Italia SLR Lady Gel Flow
    2008 white Nakamura Summit Custom mtb/Terry Falcon X
    2000 Schwinn Fastback Comp road bike/Specialized Jett

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Jacksonville area of NC
    Posts
    821
    Only time I've tent camped in my adult life is/was for the NASCAR races in Bristol, TN. (We now have a hotel booked for the past couple of years...a monsoon rainstorm one year and snow the next made me look for a hotel). We always packed coolers for drinks and food as we cooked at the campsite for breakfast and either lunch or dinner (lunch for Aug night race, dinner for spring day race). Several bins for all the cooking supplies, one chair each, plus a folding table, sleeping bags and cots. With cots that gives you more space in the tent and you also have a place to sit down. And a battery operated radio. Oh and yes we ended up the last two years bringing a generator with us as well.
    Definitely will need a flashlight and bug spray. For the spring race we brought heaters and for the Aug race we always brought fans.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    2,545
    All the above suggestions are good.

    Are you cooking? Building a fire? If so, will you collect or buy wood? You might want a saw or hatchet. I use firestarters (either homemade or purchased).

    You'll need something sturdy for food storage -- can your food supplies go into a car overnight to be safe from insects and wildlife? If you are storing food in a cooler with melting ice, be sure it's securely packaged so it doesn't get waterlogged.

    I never bother with chairs; I cut a piece from an old closed-cell foam sleeping mat and sit on that.

    Remember that if it rains EVERYTHING gets wet. I take extra garbage bags, several big Ziploc type bags and no cotton clothing.

    I second the suggestion of a hands-free light source (headlight). Good investment if you ever live through a power outage, too.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    6,034
    My hip and SI joint appreciate a chair...but to each their own!

    Since there is a threat of rain and you don't know how well the tent will work, I'd leave what I could in the car both overnight and during the day on Saturday. The low is supposed to be 59, so I'd bring a pair of pants and a long sleeve top or jacket, along with some socks.

    I always get pretty sticky camping and being basically outsie 24/7 so I bring a few change of clothes. A sun hat of some kind is helpful, too.
    Live with intention. Walk to the edge. Listen hard. Practice wellness. Play with abandon. Laugh. Choose with no regret. Continue to learn. Appreciate your friends. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is.

    --Mary Anne Radmacher

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    2,545
    I forgot one thing -- you need some kind of hands-free light in your tent. A headlight will do the job, or a small convertible flashlight.

    If you are using a regular flashlight, bring a hook to hang it inside the tent which will probably have loops for that purpose.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    the foggy wetlands,los osos,ca
    Posts
    2,860
    Headlamp headlamp headlamp! forget flash light that is what a headlamp is for. And some kind of pad to sleep on a must a total must! Would not camp without one. Did once and it hurt! and one thing I did not see mentioned and beanie for at night. a wool one. even in the summer it can get chilly. Make a list of all you want to bring and check it off. It does help you are going with people you can borrow from. a list is good. I camp allllll the time top 2 items are important to me!
    Blessed are the flexible, for they shall not be bent out of shape.
    > Remember to appreciate all the different people in your life!

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •