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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    328

    Passed a roadie on my hybrid! Got it on video!

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    Well, I think I know why I didn't get any responses to this thread I started back in February. It's probably the fact that the video started off with lots of heavy breathing, which may have been a shock to the viewer. Since then, I have made sure to edit my videos a little better so they don't start out that way They're still raw, so eventually you're gonna hear some though. That's just the reality of climbing.

    I've also lost a bit of weight and gained strength since that video was made, so I'm climbing a little better now. Nothing earth-shattering, but better than before.

    Last week I finally got around to installing super-low climbing gears on my Specialized Sirrus hybrid that I bought used last summer. It only had a 24-tooth largest rear cog, so I replaced the cassette with a Shimano MegaRange 11-34. I also replaced the stock 28-tooth front chainring with a 24, and replaced the Shimano Sora rear derailleur with a Shimano Deore long-cage mtb derailleur. I did all the work myself so the only cost to me was the parts.

    Of course, what better way to make sure the new drivetrain's working properly than a climb, right?

    The guy you see in the beginning of the first video started his descent right before I did. I passed him on the descent. About a minute later he passed me on the same descent. I got my revenge on the next climb though

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gXh-oO75xYc

    The next climb was a very steep one that I'd never ridden before, with lots of 13% and a maximum of 17% according to my Garmin.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5UoYR4Awhfk

    Garmin Connect data: http://connect.garmin.com/activity/78514622

    Here's my Sirrus at the top of the climb in the above video:


    Specialized Sirrus near top of Ridgeview Drive by kittyz202, on Flickr

    A little later on in the ride:


    Specialized Sirrus next to Folsom's 'Bicycle Friendly Community' sign by kittyz202, on Flickr

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Katy, Texas
    Posts
    1,811
    congratulations on the weight loss, drive train and passing a roadie.

    However, unless you had the sound turned off while filming, which the noise of a passing car later in the video as the down hill began seems to contradict, I didn't hear you call out an "on your left" warning, or even a "good morning," "hi there" "nice day" "how are you", "hows the ride?"" or anything verbal at all.

    If it had been me being passed you would have gotten an (in my mind anyway) well deserved sarcastic comment about "thank you for letting me know you are there," "thanks for the warning", or the like.

    Just saying......
    marni
    Katy, Texas
    Trek Madone 6.5- "Red"
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    "easily outrun by a chihuahua."

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    328
    Quote Originally Posted by marni View Post
    congratulations on the weight loss, drive train and passing a roadie.

    However, unless you had the sound turned off while filming, which the noise of a passing car later in the video as the down hill began seems to contradict, I didn't hear you call out an "on your left" warning, or even a "good morning," "hi there" "nice day" "how are you", "hows the ride?"" or anything verbal at all.

    If it had been me being passed you would have gotten an (in my mind anyway) well deserved sarcastic comment about "thank you for letting me know you are there," "thanks for the warning", or the like.

    Just saying......
    I don't know how things are in Texas, but here in California I get passed on every climbing ride by other roadies who also don't say a word to me. I don't give a darn if they say anything to me or not. Some do, some don't. If they don't I certainly don't take it personally. This guy didn't say anything to me when he passed me on the descent. Who cares.

    The reason I held back for a few seconds before passing is because I started recording at the bottom of the climb and I figured the guy was just gaining momentum and would soon ride away from me. When it became obvious he wasn't going to speed up I passed.

    Sorry if you took offense to my thread title, but I'm pretty stoked that I was finally able to pass someone for a change. Usually it's the other way around. Besides, I ride on the road too, but I don't call myself a roadie because I don't wear the typical roadie kit.
    Last edited by luv2climb; 04-13-2011 at 12:32 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    959
    Congradulations on losing weight and feeling stronger on the bike; that's exciting!!:

    I'll be honest and say that I don't understand the "need" to vocalize passing other cyclists. I've always been a competitve athlete, and will always be that way. I have defintiely used cyclists who have been in front of me as motivation to ride harder, pass them, but that's where it ends. I don't feel the need to tell my friends, put my achievement online etc...

    There have been days where I have pased another cyclist, and I know they are riding easy... perhaps a recovery day from a race, or perhaps from a tough week at work. What I have learned is that "I" may have been having a good day and passed someone, but it isn't about anyone or anything else... it's about me. I compete with myself and myself alone. While I do ride with people that are faster than me, it definitely makes me a faster cyclist and I still know what my limitations/ability levels are. It is truly very exciting to become a stronger cyclist, and it's wonderful to share with friends, and keep the motivation rolling for the next ride.

    Although I'm more than likely in the minority here, I think posting such events are crazy. The reality is that at one point or another, we will become the cyclist that we just passed. It's wonderful when we can meet our goals and ride to the next level, that's an addiction all in inself... and something that I know that I strive for. I also know that in tomorrows ride, I might be the person that someone else passes and I could be having a good day.. or a bad day... again it's simply about "ME".

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    17
    It might just be a Texas thing...when I just started getting into cycling (in Corpus Christi in '06) I got reemed out good by a cyclist for not saying "On your left". I learned my lesson quick and it doesn't matter what situation I'm in, I call out. I sometimes get funny looks, but it's better than the alternative, IMO

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    I'm the only one allowed to whine
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    10,557
    Here in the city there are enough bikes around that vocalizing ("passing on your left" or just a "hello") is a safety issue.

    If the bike you are passing doesn't know you are there, they could kill you.

    Imagine happy little Knott tootling along on her single speed mixte. She spots her prey ahead, a slightly tired roadie in full spandexed glory on a "crabon" infused plastic bike. As she silently stalks him, her front wheel overlaps his rear wheel, then gets to his cranks... then he swerves to his left to a avoid a patch of gravel and knocks into Knott's front wheel throwing her into the traffic. Mayhem ensues.

    Ooopsy.

    I looooooove passing racer-boys while I'm on inappropriate bikes. (passing the dude used as an example above is a highlight in my little world: going uphill on a ss mixte wearing sandals FTW!) It helps if they are tired and I'm not. And I always let them know I'm there so they don't kill me.

    There have been many times I've been startled by said dudes passing quite close to me with no warning. They are fast and they are concentrating. I generally yell out "ON YOUR RIGHT, HONEY!!!!" Since I'm old enough to be their mother, I can call 'em "honey" or "sugar" or "sweetie." And since they are young enough to be my children, they usually say "sorry." And since I'm a damn good rider and have been on bikes since before they were born, I manage not to startle so bad that I swerve into them.

    The big city is a dangerous place for bikes. (some chubby ol' biddy on a ss mixte might shame you! )
    "If Americans want to live the American Dream, they should go to Denmark." - Richard Wilkinson

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    4,364
    I doubt you are in the minority.... most of us just don't bother to say anything....

    I've found being in a race kit puts a target on your back - lots of yahoos out there think just because they see you they must be racing you... Just remember while you are being all self congratulatory that you passed [a man] [a racer] [insert your "achievement"], that you don't know their story at all. They might be cooling down, on a recovery day, they might be coming back from an injury or an illness, they might just not give a flying patootie about you..... you can pat yourself on the back all you like, but they may be spinning up that hill in zone 2, while you are busting a gut. If you want to measure your achievement, go do the same hills - see how you feel and how long it takes you or enter a real race - where all the other participants actually know they are racing....

    As far as vocalizing goes - I prefer roads and I prefer just passing as a car should pass - leave 3 feet, no yelling necessary.....
    Last edited by Eden; 04-13-2011 at 06:51 AM.
    "Sharing the road means getting along, not getting ahead" - 1994 Washington State Driver's Guide

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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Beautiful NW or Left Coast
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    Eden, i think you are missing the point. We know they might be in pain, or at the finish of a long grueling ride, or listening for a noise on their bike, but we get passed SO many times that it's fun to pass someone else every now and then. When you're at the slow end of the continuum, like it or not, passing someone else that is not on a little kid's bike with trainers IS an event.
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,394
    I appreciate it when someone announces they are passing me, even here on the country/suburban roads I ride on. I can usually "feel" a rider approaching, the same way I can with a car, but there have been enough times that someone (always a guy) comes up behind me, going about 25-30 to my 18 or 20 and it scared the crap out of me. This has mostly happened on one particular straight road that is a slight down hill, kind of a false flat when I am riding it to go home. It's an extremely popular route for cyclists.
    I always announce myself when passing others and I usually say hi, no matter who it is. I don't feel like I "have to" say hi, but I like to.
    But I don't make any big deal about passing others. When DH rides with me, he could be going a lot faster and people pass us. Those riders don't know how fast he really is... and they shouldn't care. I've been passed by old guys, wearing jeans, riding a mountain bike, with a backpack on. Yeah, they're stronger than me.
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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    2,545
    Quote Originally Posted by Biciclista View Post
    When you're at the slow end of the continuum, like it or not, passing someone else that is not on a little kid's bike with trainers IS an event.
    +1. That's the whole story in one sentence. I was trying to think of a way to say this, but now I don't have to.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    959
    OOPS! I think my reply was bit confusing, so let me clarify. I DO think that we should announce to a cyclist that we are about to pass.

    My earlier comment was definitely confusing... must be early morning without some caffeine. What I truly meant was that I don't think we need to vocalize to the entire world that we just passed someone.. what does that prove? I know that it's exciting, but as plenty of others have mentioned... we truly dont' know what their goal was for the day.

    Although I think the internet has given us lots of options/information; I do think that the ability to let others know each time that we blow our nose or pass someone on a bike is a bit extreme. But again, that's MHO..

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    3,150
    Quote Originally Posted by Eden View Post
    I doubt you are in the minority.... most of us just don't bother to say anything....

    I've found being in a race kit puts a target on your back - lots of yahoos out there think just because they see you they must be racing you... Just remember while you are being all self congratulatory that you passed [a man] [a racer] [insert your "achievement"], that you don't know their story at all. They might be cooling down, on a recovery day, they might be coming back from an injury or an illness, they might just not give a flying patootie about you..... you can pat yourself on the back all you like, but they may be spinning up that hill in zone 2, while you are busting a gut. If you want to measure your achievement, go do the same hills - see how you feel and how long it takes you or enter a real race - where all the other participants actually know they are racing....

    As far as vocalizing goes - I prefer roads and I prefer just passing as a car should pass - leave 3 feet, no yelling necessary.....
    Hey, whatever makes ya feel good. Some people feel good passing somebody; others obviously feel good being superior, serious racers who are "above" all that.

    On my Xtracycle I need a lot of room to pass and a lot of momentum... so usually I don't announce 'cause I'm giving at least the 3 feet a car would ... and, now that I think of it, because my huge visual imprint is usually noticed (and I may have stuff rattling around, or my bear bell on the top tube ) If I'm moving faster, I"ll usually announce.

    I know some racer-types and racer wannabees in my community think I'm a yahoo -- but I've got more to do than worry about it. The first million times I passed people I *assumed* they were going slower than usual... then I realized I'd gotten strong in my old age Still, I'll leave the actual racing to those who like to be pitted against each other. And if I keep doing yoga, I may soon be able to pat myself on the back, and I *shall* do so.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    The Great White North
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    662
    Quote Originally Posted by Biciclista View Post
    When you're at the slow end of the continuum, like it or not, passing someone else that is not on a little kid's bike with trainers IS an event.
    ++1 One of my happy memories from my pre-road bike days, when I rode a lumbering hybrid that is now my trail bike, is out-climbing two skinny young things on their road bikes who had zoomed by me earlier on the flats. As to calling out, around here, it all depends on the circumstances, conditions, location... Sometimes it makes sense, especially on narrow trails so yes, and sometimes no.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,841
    Luv2climb, that's awesome you got the gears swapped out on your bike and it's helping so much with your hill climbing!

    It always does feel like a minor victory when I manage to pass someone on a climb instead of being the one that's being passed.

    It's also kinda cool when someone drafts behind me up a hill and they look like a stronger rider than I consider myself to be.

    I tell someone that I'm passing them, if it's not obvious that they know I'm there. You know how you can see someone glance back when they hear a gear shift or something, if I see them do that and know they know I'm there, I might just say hey as I'm passing, but if I can't tell they know where I am, I do the on your left thing a couple times just in case.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Illinois
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    3,150
    Quote Originally Posted by ridebikeme View Post
    OOPS! I think my reply was bit confusing, so let me clarify. I DO think that we should announce to a cyclist that we are about to pass.

    My earlier comment was definitely confusing... must be early morning without some caffeine. What I truly meant was that I don't think we need to vocalize to the entire world that we just passed someone.. what does that prove? I know that it's exciting, but as plenty of others have mentioned... we truly dont' know what their goal was for the day.

    Although I think the internet has given us lots of options/information; I do think that the ability to let others know each time that we blow our nose or pass someone on a bike is a bit extreme. But again, that's MHO..
    Welp, that guy with no lights who was coming up behind me the other night *almost* got landed on by a snot rocket...

 

 

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