Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    10

    What Kind of Bike

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    I am getting ready to buy my first road bike. Can anyone offer some suggestions about a bike? I have my eye on the Trek Lexa S. Aluminum with Carbon Fiber Forks, I am told by two LBS's that this is an excellent starter road bike to do long road rides, centuries etc. Also, a bike from KHS Bike makers was also suggested. Never heard of them? Does any one have either of these?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Posts
    778
    I've been pondering the same question. Without really meaning to, I stepped right into the ohmygodIaminlove situation, so now I'm seriously considering a roadie. See, I just started riding about six months ago, so to be considering the one thing I SWORE I would never do sounds bizarre. OK, with a case of bike lust, I needed to slow down and go RIDE some bikes, and then make a decision. I want something with a less then aggressive (I'm not a racer) geometry. The Lexa seems, from what I've read to match that billing, but I need to go ride one to see how it feels. That's what I'd suggest.

    Good luck to us both!!!

    Shannon
    Starbucks.. did someone say Starbucks?!?!
    http://www.cincylights.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Indiana.
    Posts
    101

    Thumbs up

    I recommend test riding both bikes, as well as several others. If you know you like riding, buy the best bike you can afford so you're soon not stuck wishing you had a different bike or wanting to upgrade things (which is a lot more costly than buying a little bit more expensive bike with those things on it in the first place). Don't worry about the brand so much as they're pretty much all the same (especially for entry level bikes) and educate yourself about components (or ask someone who is more experienced) to see which bike is the better bang for the buck. Checking out the manufacture's warranty would be a good thing to do though as well (Giant bikes have a lifetime warranty, for example). Make sure the shop actually fits you to the bike and that it really does fit you-- some "bad" shops will try to get last years model bikes out of the shop or even just current bikes they have on the floor, even if it's not right for the buyer. There's now "endurance" oriented road bikes available and some say it's just a marketing hype; I won't take a side on this but do know that even on a more race oriented bike, you can swap out or flip the stem to get less saddle to handlebar drop. JMHO. Good luck and have fun searching for a bike!
    "Limits are a state of mind: break them before they break you."
    --Michael Cotty

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Katy, Texas
    Posts
    1,811
    the first time I rode my trek pilot 5.2 with a full carbon frame and upgraded to shimano ultegra, I knew it was the bike for me. Although I loved the look and appearance of both the specialized ruby and the giant orbea, neither of them or any of the other brands I tried, felt nearly as good. 5 years later, three cross country rides and a lot of long miles later, I am still in love, although I do confess I have severe bike envy from time to time.

    I would suggest a thorough try out on trek models. They seem to be reliable, predictable in service and parats and quality of manufacture.

    good luck with your decsion.
    marni
    Katy, Texas
    Trek Madone 6.5- "Red"
    Trek Pilot 5.2- " Bebe"


    "easily outrun by a chihuahua."

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    36
    Try as many bikes as you can. Also, try bikes that are above and below your price point as well so you can see the difference(advantages/disadvantages) that each possess. Most bikes come w/a carbon fork so this should not be a focal point. I would stay away from triple chainrings (on cranks) since most road bikes are not design to have triples on them (shifting is not as crisp). If you plan on climbing a lot, then look at compact cranks. Don't fall for the "women specific" marketing hype....Women and men are not that different as far as bike fitting goes. Women tend to be shorter in height (in general) therefore women specific bikes tend to have more smaller frame sizes. A women who is 5'4" tall will fit the same size bike as a man who is the same height (all things being equal). This is why Cervelo does not produce WS bikes. Any LBS worth it weight will make the final adjustments and swap out parts to fit you (i.e. handlebar width, stem length). Have fun and enjoy test riding bikes....it is the best part of buying a new bike.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Jacksonville area of NC
    Posts
    821
    I actually got to test a Lexa a few months ago on a trainer at a bike shop in Charlotte. They actually had a 47cm. It has a nice feel to it. My issue is I'm short (5ft), but have shorter legs and a longer torso. Unfortunately most companies do not make men's frames that are small enough for me to ride and the ones that do only make certain ones that way. However the Lexa was able to be adjusted to fit me by the guy at that bike shop. I'm actually looking at getting a Madone (I currently have a Trek 2000 47cm men's bike). The sister store to that one does carry Madones and Cervelos, but of course did not have one in my size (they would have let me test ride it). Also checked the two Trek stores in Raleigh and the one, well I'll never go back there, the other one also didn't have one in my size. Make sure you find a really good LBS. I currently fell I have to drive either to Mooresville/Charlotte (5 hrs away) or Raleigh (2 hrs away) as our local one is good overall, but can PO me at times as they really push Cannondale over Trek (I can't ride Cannondale as they are too big for me) and do NOT understand why I prefer certain men's items to women's items. UGH! Like the saddle I have for my road bike is a men's saddle which I LOVE, but they think I need to have a women's saddle. Um isn't fit and comfort supposed to be the important part here?
    Sorry for going off on a tanget.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,609
    Quote Originally Posted by yetigooch View Post
    MMMI would stay away from triple chainrings (on cranks) since most road bikes are not design to have triples on them (shifting is not as crisp). If you plan on climbing a lot, then look at compact cranks. Don't fall for the "women specific" marketing hype....Women and men are not that different as far as bike fitting goes. Women tend to be shorter in height (in general) therefore women specific bikes tend to have more smaller frame sizes. A women who is 5'4" tall will fit the same size bike as a man who is the same height (all things being equal). >>>
    Wow. Lots of generalizations there. If the OP has weak knees, lives (or plans to ride) in a hilly area, or is just beginning, a triple might be necessary to save her knees. I know on hilly 400k's, I like having the option of a wide range of gearing.
    Also, many women need "women specific" hype. a 5'4" tall woman will most likely have significantly longer legs than a man that same height. Therefore, she'll need a bike with a shorter toptube. Women tend to have narrower shoulders, so need narrower handlebars, and sometimes wider saddles.

    Try lots of bikes, WSD and standard, to see what fits your individual body best.

    And have fun doing it!

    EDIT: For the record, I've got a wide variety of bikes - some compacts, some standard doubles, and two with triples. Most are standard geometries, and only two are WSD. BUT, I have shorter legs compared to most of my friends. I have two friends who are the exact same height as me, and if they borrow a bike, they raise the seat by two inches, at least!
    Last edited by Pedal Wench; 01-26-2011 at 07:13 AM.
    For 3 days, I get to part of a thousand other journeys.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Indiana.
    Posts
    101
    Here's an article on women's specific bikes- http://bikeandbody.blogspot.com/2009...ific-myth.html

    Some women are better off on unisex bikes, just as some men would maybe be better off on a more women's specific bike; It all depends on the way you are built.

    Don't be afraid to try unisex bikes as: they may fit you better, chances are you'll have to swap out the saddle regardless of the bike you purchase, and regardless of what bike you purchase, you may have to swap out the stem and/or handlebars as well.

    On bikes built up with Shimano componentry, manufactures put little "shims" in the shifters to help those with shorter fingers / smaller hands. This is done on most women's specific bikes (w/ Shimano), but remember that you can get these cheaply to put on any bike outfitted with Shimano componentry.
    "Limits are a state of mind: break them before they break you."
    --Michael Cotty

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Posts
    778
    I'd also say that any bike shop that tries to push a WSD bike (or any other WSD product) at a woman, just because she is a woman, needs to be slapped.

    Some bike shops drink the corporate kool-aid too much and try and steer toward popular models, etc. A good sales person will listen to you and THEN offer advice. Don't let yourself be pushed one way or another.. let your body tell you what feels right and ask loads of questions.

    There is a certain amount of tweaking and adjusting that can be done and one bike set up wrong (for you) can make you feel like your fighting an unwilling beast to the finish line, but set up properly can lead you over miles and miles of joyous adventures.

    SOME bikes are just plain WRONG for you too!!
    Starbucks.. did someone say Starbucks?!?!
    http://www.cincylights.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    4,632
    Yes, try both unisex and WSD bikes.

    My current bike is women-specific, but I'm shopping, and I'm considering both unisex and women-specific bikes. Just test-ride a bunch of them, even bikes you wouldn't consider buying. You never know. You've gotten some good advice here. Have fun!
    At least I don't leave slime trails.
    http://wholecog.wordpress.com/

    2009 Giant Avail 3 |Specialized Jett 143

    2013 Charge Filter Apex| Specialized Jett 143
    1996(?) Giant Iguana 630|Specialized Riva


    Saving for the next one...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Katy, Texas
    Posts
    1,811
    gosh and here I am loving my triple ring and constantly worrying about if I get my dream madone 6.5 for my 65th birthday can I have a triple with a granny gear on it? Silly me- I have bad knees but strong legs. I can climb like a demon in a granny gear at 3 miles an hour and can ride the flatlands in the stiffer gears and larger rings or largest depending on whether I am doing resistance or speed intervals.

    Try lots of bikes, I myself ride a none WSD but have also tried out some WSD designs that have felt really sweet. I just happen to be partial to trek as a manufacturer and to a triple ring because it works for me.
    marni
    Katy, Texas
    Trek Madone 6.5- "Red"
    Trek Pilot 5.2- " Bebe"


    "easily outrun by a chihuahua."

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    1,192
    Whatever else you do, make sure the bike you get makes you smile. Life is too short to ride a bike that doesn't make you smile.
    Give big space to the festive dog that make sport in the roadway. Avoid entanglement with your wheel spoke.
    (Sign in Japan)

    1978 Raleigh Gran Prix
    2003 EZ Sport AX

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    10

    Thanks!

    What a great forum this is, it's like being united with all these great women riders out there in the world. Thanks so much for all your input and help! I feel much more confident!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Jacksonville area of NC
    Posts
    821
    marni, my road bike is also a triple. Come to think of so is my mountain bike.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Madison WI
    Posts
    280
    Have you considered steel? Jamis makes a nice looking steel road bike that is under 20lbs I LOVE my steel bike.

    Or if you want to try entry-level - consider a more "vintage" road bike from craigslist. Columbus or Reynolds 531 steel is nice and lightweight.
    Alison - mama of 2 (8yo and 6yo)
    2009 Independent Fabrication steel Crown Jewel SE
    1995 trek 800 steel MTV

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •