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Thread: wind burn

  1. #16
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    Dec 2007
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    cataboo: ha ha, I'd probably end up with the skull and feel really stupid.

    crankin: yes, I feel clustrophobic wearing my neck gaiter while cycling, or doing active snowboarding (as in huffing and puffing up an incline I didn't have enough speed to get over).

    I bought the fleece mask thingy yesterday. I couldn't try them on because they were packaged up so when I got home and tried it on, it was big, even though it was a size small. I'm thinking "I didn't realize I had such a small face, I'll need an XXS at this rate". Well, upon closer inspection, the label on the inside tag said "L". I'm not sure I'll want to wear it, though. I'm not one to care too much about how I look,but I'll for sure feel very self conscious wearing this one. I'll look into the wool buff. I'm sure I can even wear it as a top in summer

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,841
    My helmet makes me feel claustrophobic where it is around my neck. If I have a zipper pulled up or a neck gaiter or a bandana or whatever else around it, It gets really annoying.

    Badger, you can pick which one you get. If you buy 3, you can't pick what 2 of them are.

  3. #18
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    Dec 2007
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    ok, so I just went to REI.com and saw that the wool buff is pretty much an elongated version of my smartwool neck gaiter. I was expecting more of a bandana style.

    I might just get this. One of the reviewers wore it cycling.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    321
    I think they make them extra long so you can do this with it:



    And a million other things. I actually started with the smart wool balaclava and it was too loose around my face, but I have a narrowish face. It did breathe well!

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    203
    Quote Originally Posted by Crankin View Post
    Am I the only one who feels strangled and claustrophobic when wearing a balaclava?
    I'm claustrophobic enough that I can just barely manage a neck gaiter. It drives me crazy, but I've had frostbite on my nose and chin and the pain caused by cold wind is worse than feeling trapped When I need more coverage (extremely rare here in Austin) I use a fleece scarf: I drape it over my head with one end lots longer than the other, put on my helmet, and experiment with wrapping until it's secure. Haven't had to do that in a while, however; I'm good with the neck gaiter down to about 25.

  6. #21
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    Jul 2007
    Location
    Bothell area, WA
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    Quote Originally Posted by badger View Post
    Oh yes, I was picturing exactly one like that! thanks!

    any experience with either of them? I could certainly use it when snowboarding, too. It absolutely hurts my face when sitting on the chair lift and the wind is pelting small bits of snow in -20C temps. Neck gaitors can do only so much.

    I see the Canadian version of REI (MEC) carries the neoprene comfort one. I wonder if the fleece might be overkill for riding? definitely not for snowboarding, though.
    I have one similar to that but very lightweight, from Gore: http://www.gorebikewear.com/remote/S...1208436871979A

    I rode with it in MA winters down to about 10F with great success. It's great for windbreaking but isn't real heavy or hot. The only thing about this type of thing is you should put your glasses *on top* of the nose piece, as otherwise your breath goes up into your glasses and fogs them up. And in very cold temps you get that whole ice/frost forming around your mouth, but that's an issue for any similar solution.
    Almost a Bike Blog:
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    Never give up. Never surrender.

  7. #22
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    Dec 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by kfergos View Post
    The only thing about this type of thing is you should put your glasses *on top* of the nose piece, as otherwise your breath goes up into your glasses and fogs them up.

    a perfect segue to another topic: glasses.

    I don't ride with them, but my partner's adamant that I wear them as grit and who-knows-what might fly into my face. I tried them once when it was pouring, and it made everything worse. I couldn't see, and they just felt like they were in the way.

    Is this normal? or do I need to buy proper cycling glasses? the pair I used were the cheap, clear lens "safety glasses" that look like cycling glasses.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
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    13,394
    I ride with sunglasses, but as soon as there's even a bit of moisture, they fog. I have tried "Cat Crap," to fix the problem to no avail. In the fall I was doing regular early AM rides in the dark, and I mostly ended up taking my clear glasses off. Since I don't regularly ride in rain or snow, it's not such an issue, but it is when I x country ski. I feel blinded by the sun, but I reallly can't see at all with the sunglasses on.
    When I ride, I always wear my glasses on the outside of my helmet straps and when I have a beanie or balaclava on, on the outside of that. If anyone else has a suggestion, let me know, because I really don't like riding without glasses covering my eyes.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
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  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Bothell area, WA
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    564
    Badger - clear safety glasses should do it. I feel that they're a safety thing (flying sand particles, floating bits of ground-up salt; then in the summer there are gnats and bugs), especially in the winter. They'll actually help keep your eyes warmer when it's really cold out! Also they help keep your eyes from watering, which can be a real problem when it's cold. Generally riding in cold weather as long as you're moving glasses will stay clear. A trick to keep them from fogging: Pull them away from your face a little bit when you slow down or stop. Also, if you're wearing something over your mouth, try to direct your breath down towards your chest rather than straight out.

    About the rain riding: Glasses suck in the rain or in heavy mist. They get covered with water and you almost need little windshield wipers or something to deal with it. I might pass on wearing them when it's lightly misting (I have prescription ones that I have to wear, so it's moot for me), but a heavy rain actually will wash down your glasses and not obscure the view as much. After a while I just adjusted to having water on the lenses; with some practice, you can see tolerably well in most conditions, and for commuting that's usually good enough.
    Last edited by kfergos; 01-27-2011 at 11:23 AM. Reason: Comment re: Rain
    Almost a Bike Blog:
    http://kf.rainydaycommunications.net/

    Never give up. Never surrender.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Columbia, MO
    Posts
    2,041
    A friend of mine forgot her sunglasses one ride, and ended up having to wear an eye patch for a couple weeks because something flew into her eye! I'd been pretty good about wearing either sunglasses or goggles, because I don't like dust in my eyes, but since that happened to her I wear them like my helmet, all the time.
    2009 Trek 7.2FX WSD, brooks Champion Flyer S, commuter bike

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    1,333
    Aside from that one time, I've never ridden with any form of glasses. I need sunglasses when I drive, but they seem to hinder me when I'm walking or riding - weird, huh?

    I've had gnats fly into my eye and the occasional "OMG, what's that in my eye?!" moments but fortunately nothing bad. I really ought to just get used to wearing them for my own safety. Eyes are so fragile!!

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
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    14,501
    I ALWAYS wear eye protection for safety.

    As I've said before, I wear the S&W Mini Magnum which are sized for a youth/woman's face, come in smoke, clear and amber, have excellent optical quality, are ANSI Z87+ shatterproof and UV-blocking since they're polycarbonate, and they're $9 each.

    A couple of years ago on TOSRV we were hit by a serious downpour. I was one of the few people who could see anything at all, since I'd remembered to bring my clear glasses.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

 

 

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