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Thread: Remove pedals

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    6,449

    Remove pedals

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    I want to remove the pedals from my 23 year old Miyata. The greece looks, well, wet and not dried on or welded tight.

    Problem: found the right -sized allen wrench, but can't even begin to get adquate leverage to remove the pedals. I tried an ordinary loose key, and one that folds into a heavy-duty multi-tool set.

    Should I buy a full-sized allen wrench handle with the interchangeable tools?

    Should I try some other type of tool?

    Help! I don't want to resort to the LBS for this. It shouldn't be that complicated!

    I do know the left pedal is not righty tighty lefty loosey, but the opposite, so that's not it. Just can't do it
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  2. #2
    violetpurl Guest
    I had to buy a pedal wrench. I think the length of the handle gives you more leverage.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    south georgia
    Posts
    953
    Pedal wrench or torque wrench, and lots of patience, I ripped my hand open taking pedals off my husbands Cervelo P2C, it wasn't pretty. All else fails, LBS baby!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    A narrow piece of pipe over the end of the Allen wrench will give you more leverage.

    But if the threads are seized, it can take a LOT of strength to get a pedal off. You don't necessarily need the LBS, but you may need someone with a lot of upper body strength, and you may need to make it a two-person job, with one person holding the opposite pedal/crankarm (careful of your fingers!!!) while the other wales on the wrench.

    A pneumatic impact driver could come in handy if you have one, or possibly just using impact by hammering on the end of your lever (be sure to use a block of wood or an old rag or something so you're not hammering metal on metal).


    ETA: also, remember that since you have the kind of pedals that use an Allen wrench on the back, everything's reversed; you're actually turning in the "tightening" direction to loosen the pedal, because you're pushing the spindle away from the head, same as if you were tightening a screw. So as you look at the Allen head of the spindle, it's actually the right one that turns "backwards" (i.e., you turn the wrench clockwise to loosen the right pedal), even though it's the left that's reverse threaded.


    Edit again, @PW: NEVER use a torque wrench to loosen something tight. A beam wrench will just bend, and isn't strong enough to do the job; a click-type or electronic wrench is an expensive piece of equipment that isn't meant to put a lot of pressure in the opposite direction. (Also, remember to take the torque off a click-type torque wrench when it's not in use, to decrease wear on the spring.)
    Last edited by OakLeaf; 08-30-2010 at 04:16 PM.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    Hmmm.

    Great advice all!

    Think I'll go to the LBS tomorrow
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    4,083
    If I'm lucky i can remove pedals with an ordinary allen key, but for seized ones (or ones that my dh put on ) I need my long, hefty pedal wrench, and I still have to stamp on it. The best tip I have is to immobilize the other pedal under something that won't budge, I use the bottom of our shed wall.
    Winter riding is much less about badassery and much more about bundle-uppery. - malkin

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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    105
    Take the bike outside, boil a kettle & empty the whole thing over the end of the crank. Eventually (plus a fair amount of welly & a long-handled either round or padded wrench) this will get the pedals off.

    Oh yes - and before you start on the drive side - put the chain on the largest ring. Otherwise you risk smashing your knuckles on the sharp teeth when the pedal lets go - I know, I've done it more than once & I'm a mechanic . . .

    (Corinne @ The Bike Whisperer)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    Thanks, those are great suggestions!
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    2,559
    There's been a few times in the shop where we had to put a pipe on the opposite crank arm when we wanted to get a really stubborn pedal off. You can have good torque on the pedal wrench, but without matching counter-torque on the crank it doesn't work. But this is mainly on kids bikes with short cranks.
    Oil is good, grease is better.

    2007 Peter Mooney w/S&S couplers/Terry Butterfly
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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    So Cal.
    Posts
    508
    The pipe method always works geat for me. It's called a 'breaker-bar', as my dad would say. If it's really bad, I wrap the opposite pedal in a rag and have someone strong hold it, or I set the pedals at 6/12 and the tool at about 9:30 with the breaker-bar on it and carefully push down with my foot. Sometimes penetrating oil helps. The Park-Toosl website has a lot of good info: http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=83
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