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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    2,545

    Would I be crazy to take up running at age 60?

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    Especially in winter, I'm envious of runners who just get out there and get it done without the rigmarole a bike requires. Much as I love winter biking, it would be nice to have a choice.

    I'm not worried about overall fitness -- mine is pretty good. I do wonder about knees and such though. I am good at moderation, and could do things like half-run/half-walk.

    Has anyone taken up running at a mature age?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    West MI
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    4,259
    Do it! You'll be fine if you are careful and don't rush the pace or distance. I highly recommend starting with the Couch-to-5k plan. You could probably even skip the first 2-3 weeks, since your fitness is already good (I did this, too).

    Running and biking are really nice complements of one-another. I have sort of come to the realization that Winter and Spring should be my more running-intensive seasons (biking maybe 50-75 miles/week on the indoor trainer), then Summer and Fall will be mostly about biking, with just enough running thrown-in to maintain some degree of running-specific fitness (15-20 miles/week).
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,372
    I took up running at 42 (but as a type I diabetic that means my body is ~ 50 due to the extra wear and tear). I never would have done it without vibrams.
    Get good shoes! and take it easy and you might find it to be a wonderful thing. Just listen to your body and go for it!
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
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    3,436
    I did--two years ago at age 54. Try finding a certified chi running instructor in your area---chi running is very focused on injury prevention. I haven't had any injuries.
    "My predominant feeling is one of gratitude. I have loved and been loved;I have been given much and I have given something in return...Above all, I have been a sentient being, a thinking animal, on this beautiful planet, and that in itself has been an enormous privilege and an adventure." O. Sacks

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Little Egypt
    Posts
    1,867
    No, you wouldn't be crazy and, yes, you can do it. I started running at 50 and ran a half-marathon at 51. I'm slow and I take it easy but I'm having a blast. The running and cycling definitely do compliment each other and it's a great way to stay in shape over the winter. The couch to 5k program works great. Just take it easy--we mature women don't recover as quickly as the younsters do.

    So how good are you at swimming? You might be doing triathlons by next year
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3,176
    Don't your feet hurt?
    I used to ice my feet after runs when I was in my 30s, and quit shortly after that.

    I miss it sometimes.
    Each day is a gift, that's why it is called the present.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
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    Mrs. KnottedYet
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    9,082
    Go for it! Sister Madonna Buder ran her first Ironman at 55 and as far as I know has not stopped running since.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madonna_Buder
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
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    14,501
    +1 on Chi Running and not too much shoe. If you don't get started with the built-up shoes then you don't have to wean yourself off them.

    I think there are a lot of us here who started running in our late 40s or early 50s. I can't speak to 60 yet, but why not try? There's plenty available about injury prevention (a lot of it boils down to strengthening your feet and your hips), and I don't see why that should be any different at any age - younger people heal more quickly and can sometimes get away with more sloppiness, but it's really not an excuse for them to continually injure themselves.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    12

    Can you afford a running coach to get you started?

    If you have never run, I would recommend a couple of sessions with a running coach to get you started. He/she will teach you proper form (stride length, foot strike, arm and hand position, hip position, etc); teach you how to do flexibility exercises; and teach you how to train smart to prevent injury to yourself.


    A resource for running coaches is Road Runners Club of American (RRCA). RRCA is also a good resource for running in general.

    http://www.rrca.org/find-a-coach/

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,394
    I'd say, do it.
    I started running in January 09, for the reasons you mentioned. First, on the treadmill, then outside. I really liked it, even though I am slow, slow, slow. But, when I got up to 4-5 miles, my right hip/lumbar region started acting up. I would stop running for awhile, start again, and same thing. Finally, after many stops and starts, foam roller, stretching, I stopped in June, after running in a 5K race I promised my friend I would do (a charity race for the hospital she works for).
    Well, last week, I realized that all of a sudden, my back isn't hurting! I mean, it hurt all of the time. Now, I am torn. I like running in the fall and winter; when I run and ride at the same time, at age 56 (almost 57), it seems to affect my cycling a lot. My legs are really heavy/sore. I do ride through early December, but by the end of october, it's less and less.
    Yesterday, I did a 30 minute interval walk on the treadmill. I did lots of hill intervals at a 5% grade while walking, and i also snuck in 3 one minute running intervals at a very slow pace (5.6 mph). My back feels fine. But, I am still very uncertain if I should start up again. The fact that you can just go out the door and run, really appeals to me and it keeps the weight down, too.
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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    2,545
    I really hope TE stays in business as long as I'm alive so I can get encouragement for whatever my crazy-old-lady interests turn out to be.

    Even in this group, I thought I'd get some don't-do-it comments. Instead, I get how 'bout a triathlon? Well, I don't love swimming so that probably won't happen, but running makes sense the more I think about it.

    Thanks for the advice. I'd never heard of chi running and I'd never thought of getting a coach. I will look into both.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    On my bike
    Posts
    2,505
    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    +1 on Chi Running and not too much shoe. If you don't get started with the built-up shoes then you don't have to wean yourself off them.
    ++1 on Chi running. I took a workshop a couple of weeks ago and am absolutely AMAZED at how I am now running without the usual aches & pains. If you can find a workshop, go for it & consider it your running coach!

    I used to have hamstring, hip, lower back, knee and even arm pain (being too tensed up probably because of the other pains! ) Last week I ran a 10K for the first time ever, outdoors on a trail. I figured I'd pay for it big time the next morning - and nothing. My leg muscles definitely knew they'd been used in a different manner from cycling, but after I moved around a bit I was fine.

    Oh, and I just turned 56 & have arthritis in many joints - mainly knee and lower back. I can't say enough about Chi running.
    To train a dog, you must be more interesting than dirt.

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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    2,545
    So this chi running is what we are talking about?

    There is a Level 1 workshop coming up. Well worth the price if it truly helps avoid injury. Are they serious about not using your legs for propulsion?

    I am quite tempted to do this.

    Then if I need more help there is no shortage of running coaches.
    Last edited by PamNY; 08-25-2010 at 05:48 PM.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,501
    They're totally serious about that! Now, it's a matter of degree, and I don't know if anyone truly doesn't use their legs at all - certainly not me!

    I learned at a workshop also and I highly recommend it. At the time I was running 3-5 miles one day a week and just that little bit beat me up like a jackhammer. I'm now training for my second marathon...
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    On my bike
    Posts
    2,505
    They also teach you how to land mid-foot rather than heel first. A mid-foot landing is much less jarring to backs, knees, etc.
    To train a dog, you must be more interesting than dirt.

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    Trek FX 7.4 Hybrid

 

 

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