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  1. #31
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    Jun 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by thekarens View Post
    I had the same "Come to Jesus" moment this January. I'm 42 and when I started I was 5'3 and 200 lbs. I'm still 42 (and 5'3) but I'm down to 140 lbs. I'd still like to lose 10 more pounds. When I started I couldn't stay on the elliptical more than 5 minutes, now an hour is easy. However, the bike and fitness is still kicking my rear. I find endurance on the MTB much easier than the road bike. 20 miles at around 13/14 mph is the most I can do. I very much admire your endurance.
    Whoa! Amazing accomplishment!!!

    One year isn't very long at all for what you've done on (and off!) bike. I'm sure you know, but it's a multi-year sport. And speed isn't necessary. You can make a lot of riding improvements by working on handling and fine-tuned technique, and leaving the speed to increase more naturally. Which it will as your handling becomes stronger.

    I find it less stressful, plus, my cycling improves more dramatically in all areas when I focus on careful technique.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

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  2. #32
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    San Antonio Heights, CA (Upland)
    Posts
    1,068
    It's possible that nutrition is to blame. However, you could also have other things going on in your body that are affecting you. I'm 43 and two years ago, when I was training my hardest and riding my fastest, my period came and the next club ride I did, I started the first half strong, then limped home . . . like you. After that I really couldn't ride worth beans for about a month. Had a lot of fatigue and some dizziness. Thought it was low iron. Upped my iron intake and then started feeling better and actually did my fastest century ever (shouldn't have done it at all in retrospect). The next few months I didn't ride as much, but when 2011 hit, I got serious about training again. However, like you, when I'd do a long distance ride, I'd "bonk" at around 40 miles or so and limp home. In March I somehow managed to do a really strong half century (after giving up the notion of doing the full century). Then my period came and, once again, on the next club ride, I rode the first half strong, then limped home. And that was my last "real" ride for a very, very long time. Again, I had a lot of fatigue and when I stood, I'd get the black out sensation (though never actually passed out). I took a lot of naps and if I rode my bike at all, it was 5 miles, flat, at around 10 mph (or less).

    The first thing I discovered I had was adrenal fatigue. Eventually I learned that "all" my hormones were low. My naturopathic doctor said if she didn't know I was still having periods, she'd assume I was in menopause by my test results. I also have subclinical hypothyroidism and candida. All of the things I listed are often interchangeable, meaning when you have one, you may have one or more of the others. I was also low in vitamin D, and just found out I have high levels of mercury and lead poisoning. (Mercury due at least in part to amalgam (aka:silver) fillings, which I'm getting replaced soon). Every one of the things listed can cause fatigue and mercury poisoning can potentially be the culprit of them all (along with other symptoms I have had for years . . . and the periodontitis that took all my upper teach several years ago. I've had so many dentists shake their heads trying to figure out how I got periodontitis. Well mercury poisoning can cause it). I've been doing a natural method of mercury detox for four months, even before actually being tested, cause I knew it was a likely culprit.

    I have never felt 100% healthy. Since my 20's I have felt like I should have a lot more energy than I do. I think some of my issues have been underlying conditions that didn't completely rear their ugly heads until I got serious about cycling. Pushing my body as much as I did, which was completely normal exertion for a "healthy" person, pushed my body over the edge until I HAD to stop riding and figure out what was wrong.

    I'm just now starting to see some progress. Some of my hormones are in the normal range now. My vitamin D is way up, but still not optimal. My TSH (thyroid test) is better (not optimal, but better than it's been). I'm feeling less fatigued and less dizzy. I've been slowly amping up my rides and exertion level.

    So . . . like I said, nutrition may be your only issue. I don't know. But what you describe in your rides sounds so much like what I was experiencing and when you said you were 42, it threw up another red flag. You may want to have your hormones tested, vitamin D levels, thyroid, etc.

    I don't want to start a debate with anyone (been there on this board with this topic), but I personally, avoid conventional doctors and stick with natural medicine as much as possible, but that's me. Most conventional doctors don't recognize adrenal fatigue as an actual condition because there are no drugs to cure it and the drug industry funds medical schools. Conventional doctors also often read thyroid results differently than natural ones, meaning, one doctor may think your thyroid is fine, while the other realizes it may at the least need some "help". I am also not a fan of taking drugs, so I've been on herbal tinctures to help balance hormones and other natural supplements.

    Anyway, I can go on all day really, so I"ll stop right here. Feel free to PM me if you want to ask me anything. I do hope you only issue is nutrition, but wanted you to be aware of these other possibilities.

    Take care!
    GO RIDE YOUR BIKE!!!

    2009 Cannondale Super Six High Modulus / SRAM Red / Selle San Marco Mantra

  3. #33
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Katy, Texas
    Posts
    1,828
    my top wieght was 260 at 5'4" I am currently at 150 and aiming for 140, but my focus is more on eliminating fat and eating whole food and healthy without feeling like I am constantly starving and deprived since it is a long term, daily exercise/discipline. Plus I also aim at keeping a calorie deficit on a daily basis which is why I wear a body monitor which gives me an approximation of how may calories I burn vs how many I eat. On days when I am really deficit, I know to eat a bit more the next day,and will probably feel a bit draggy. It's all a balancing act. Since my mammo came back clear a couple of weeks ago, I have stopped taking the tamoxifen and it is amazing how much more energy and enthusiasm I have and hopefully there will be less comfort eating.
    marni
    Katy, Texas
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  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,352

    Re: 50 miles...is that all?

    That's amazing Marni! I know how much effort and discipline it takes to keep it up. I use myfitnesspal for my calorie counting, carbs, fat, etc and an HRM for burned calories.

    I could take a few lessons from you. There are days I have no desire to keep it up. I'm naturally lazy and I like junk food.

    PS congrats on the test results! That's wonderful!
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  5. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    perpetual traveler
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jiffer View Post
    I don't want to start a debate with anyone (been there on this board with this topic), but I personally, avoid conventional doctors and stick with natural medicine as much as possible, but that's me. Most conventional doctors don't recognize adrenal fatigue as an actual condition because there are no drugs to cure it and the drug industry funds medical schools. Conventional doctors also often read thyroid results differently than natural ones, meaning, one doctor may think your thyroid is fine, while the other realizes it may at the least need some "help". I am also not a fan of taking drugs, so I've been on herbal tinctures to help balance hormones and other natural supplements.
    Do you expect to slander the medical profession and then say you don't want a debate?

    Sometimes this forum frustrates me.
    Trek Madone 4.7 WSD
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    Richard Feynman: “The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool.”

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,102
    There are good and bad in every profession, so wholesale condemnation of a whole profession doesn't set well w/ me. I just hope no one says this about my profession.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
    Posts
    6,981
    I'm glad you're feeling better, Jiffer. I am the sort of person that avoids if possible taking aspirins, etc. I don't even get a flu shot. Maybe I will when I get older and weaker in general.

    I guess on Western trained doctors vs. naturpathic doctors I wouldn't be wholesale condemning one over the other for everything. While it maybe true that the pharmaceutical giants try to win over the doctors with freebie samples,etc. there are doctors more willing to at least listen or try to keep current....

    My personal feeling /biases is so much based on the following realities, Jiffer:

    a) A sister who is a Western trained doctor and practices medicine for past 15 yrs. --she is not against acupuncture and sees benefits for certain conditions. (Whereas others even here in this forum, question it..) She explains known drug reactions when family members ask.

    b) Another sister who is a practicing and licensed pharmacist in a teaching hospital. (They have tremendous knowledge ...in Canada university study of pharmcology is 5 yrs. prior to exam and certification.) Yes, sometimes this sister knows certain drugs more than sister a), only because a doctor has to be selective in keeping current vs. highly specialized areas/atypical diseases. The 2 do collaborate

    c) A close friend who did her Master's in Pharmcokinetics, worked for major global drug firm. Left to go back to school..and is a naturopathic doctor.

    NOW --who would I tend to consult first?: If it questions concerning prescribed drugs, treatments from a doctor (I have my own family doctor. My sister is 2nd opinion only.), then I would be asking both sisters. I would consider naturpathic doctor for diet (though they are not registered dieticians), preventive health care. Would I want my father to see a naturpathic doctor for his prostate cancer? No. Am I glad he's not yet on chemotherapy? Yes, it's extending his quality of life...and my doctor-sister supports his decision. (He has an oncologist.)

    Yes, I know I am extraordinarily lucky to have immediate informal access to expertise. Also to have a family member is now serving to advocate for parent.
    Last edited by shootingstar; 11-20-2012 at 12:13 PM.
    My Personal blog on cycling & other favourite passions.
    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know what’s in a person’s heart.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,102
    There is a place for everything. I've done acupuncture, yoga, counseling, PT, and regular medication when no doctor could figure out what was wrong with me. Maybe I am jaded because I live in a place where I have access to world class medical care and there is no shortage of physicians who fully believe in complementary medicine as needed. I think you need to be a very good advocate for yourself and understand the value and risks of all treatments. Even alternative medicine (herbs, dietary supplements) have serious side effects.
    My experience with symptoms very similar to Jiffers' is that it helped me to give up all expectations of speed. I could care less about stats or competing against anyone, except myself. I got back to where I was, and now I just don't care. I am fitter than I was before I got sick because I am doing other sports and I changed my diet. And, I enjoy cycling a lot more.
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