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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
    Posts
    6,981

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    I would have to be desperate to have a corned beef sandwich during a ride stop. But I would and need a drink/water.

    Preferred sandwiches: ham, cheese, veggie, or turkey
    a small mini pizza or pizza-like bun

    I could have also sushi...a couple of pieces would be the same thing. Remember there is vegetarian sushi...

    I actually find bananas abit too drying during a ride, but I will have half of one with water. I prefer tangerines or orange slices or grapes/other berries.

    Slices of fresh mango, would be so nice. I like to fantasize.
    My Personal blog on cycling & other favourite passions.
    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know whatís in a personís heart.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    242
    My guess is better nutrition and lots of hydration beyond sugary stuff. Protien will help you endure!

    Another suggestion is better said in the Old Bull, Young Bull story:

    "The old bull and the young bull were standing at the top of the hill overlooking a paddock of many gorgeous young heifers. The young bull said "Let's charge down the hill, knock over that fence and each service one of those heifers". The old bull replied "Why don't we saunter down the hill, open the gate, take a sip at the water trough and then service ALL of those heifers??"

    In other words don't go all out at first it's not how fast you can be but it's can you finish the ride. Slow down and enjoy yourself!
    Life is like a 10 speed bike, we all have gears we never use.
    Charles Schultz

    "The bicycle is just as good company as most husbands and, when it gets old and shabby, a woman can dispose of it and get a new one without shocking the entire community." ó Ann Strong, Minneapolis Tribune, 1895

  3. #18
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    10
    After reading everyone's responses to their eating habits while riding, I've come to the conclusion that I'm not taking in enough calories!

    I've ridden for quite a while now...but I think it's really come to light for me this season (probably due to being a little older)! But anyway, I've got a request to get Nancy Clark's book on nutrition from the libary (which I'm looking forward to reading) and I'm going to start experimenting with eating more on these long rides.

    I've done some additonal research on the number of calories and carbs needed each hour of riding so this has given me a good idea of what to take on the next long ride (this weekend). Also I've invested in some different flavors of gel and I'm going to try those too!

    I hope to have a better ride this weekend...I'll let you know!

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    1,061
    Nancy Clark's book is excellent. I actually have three versions. Even her recipes are good!

    Just glossing over "Fueling during and after exercise" says:

    100-250 calories of carbs per hour after the first hour
    Mix it up--use food and fluids to get a variety of fuel
    Experiment to see what you can tolerate
    "Keep in mind that too much sugar or food taken at once can slow down the rate at which fluids leave the stomach and become available to replace sweat losses. Be more conservative with your sugar fixes during intense exercise in hot weather, when rapid fluid replacement is perhaps more important than carb replacement........."
    Weigh yourself before and after to determine if you are consuming enough fluids.

    During our first century, I actually set a timer for every 45 min, so we didn't get behind on intake. I can't say we ate the right things, but we ATE! If I rolled into a stop and one bottle wasn't empty, I knew I wasn't drinking enough (stomach sloshing is bad--I used to get that running!)

    Marathon books are also great sources of info. For some reason there just aren't as many books about endurance cycling! Although runners stomaches tend to me more sensitive, the info is still applicable. Try Marathon by Galloway.
    "Well-behaved women seldom make history." --Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

    '09 Trek WSD 2.1 with a Brooks B-68 saddle
    '11 Trek WSD Madone 5.2 with Brooks B-17

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    1,061
    Quote Originally Posted by ny biker View Post
    OMG corned beef!! I would be on my knees on the side of the road...

    The first long ride I did was a little over 60 miles on the C&O Canal towpath (Harpers Ferry to DC, for those familiar with it). We stopped at White's Ferry for lunch and I had a turkey sandwich, which was the lightest thing on the menu. My friend had a cheesesteak. I couldn't even watch him eat it.
    One time, we rode out for breakfast. For some reason, the bacon omelette special sounded yummy! My husband cringed when I ordered. I didn't yak, but let's say I enjoyed the omelette for the rest of the day!

    That was the last time we rode out for breakfast. Now we pack a thermos of coffee and a snack--hold the bacon!
    "Well-behaved women seldom make history." --Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

    '09 Trek WSD 2.1 with a Brooks B-68 saddle
    '11 Trek WSD Madone 5.2 with Brooks B-17

  6. #21
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,828
    One thing I learned last summer from the latest edition of Nancy Clark's book is that I wasn't getting enough sodium during rides. I started using Gu Roctane (more electrolytes than regular Gu) and I actually noticed an improvement in how I felt, especially on hot days.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    So Cal.
    Posts
    508
    What's so odd about a home made corned beef sandwich on rye? I took it in my camelback on a MTB ride in the hills near Ojai CA. After climbing and climbing up from just outside town, I sat down at the highpoint, with a great view of the ocean, cows and the channel islands, and had my sandwich, a banana and some energy drink. After about 1/2 hr rest, I finished the ride (was at the half way point). As long as I take a little time to just relax after eating, I'm good to go. I had more trouble with the live beef that blocked the trail on several occasions and forced me to stop and wait. And it sure beat being really hungry after the ride and getting crap from McDonald's or Taco Bell.
    Tzvia- rollin' slow...
    Specialized Ruby Expert/mens Bontrager Inform RXL
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    Novara E.T.A commuter/mens Bontrager Inform RL

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Riding my Luna & Rivendell in the Hudson Valley, NY
    Posts
    8,409
    I guess we are all different. I would have no problem with a corned beef sandwich on a ride. Many times I've had bacon and eggs or lox and eggs before a 50 mile ride....i always start with a nice breakfast. and a croissant and latte.
    Lisa
    Our bikes...OurBikes...and my mountain dulcimer blog
    Ruby's Website and My blog
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    2,560
    I can eat anything at all before and during a long ride. I don't travel very fast -- perhaps that makes a difference? It takes a ton of food to get me through a 50-mile day. And I enjoy every bit of it.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    10
    It's been several weeks but I just want give an update. Last weekend, was a good example. I rode 40 miles on Saturday, very hilly route and even threw in a 22% grade short climb...I started of with a Hammer gel shot after 60 minutes and 30 minutes there after and even ate a fig bar at the rest stop. No problems on the ride...I felt great. The ride was topped of with a good size lunch that had some protein and plenty of carbs within an hour after riding.

    and....

    I haven't done this in a long time...but I did a hilly 60 mile group ride the following day. I used the Hammer gel again during the ride and drank Cytomax. Another great ride...without bonking!

    How much you eat on a ride does make a difference! I appreciate everyone's thoughts and comments on this one. I also read Nancy Clark's book too... which was also helpful. Nancy's comments about eating within an hour after riding definitely helps with leg muscle soreness and speeds up recovery.

    Thanks again!

  11. #26
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Katy, Texas
    Posts
    1,828
    I am 64 years old and my average long distance speed is 14.5 -15 mph. On the most recent cross country ride I did (New Orleans LA to Itasca, MN along th eMIssissippi) took me through flat hot and hunid delta riding, rolling hills and wind, steep climbs with and without wind. Since I wear a body monito I can safely say that on a average day ( 75 miles) I burned between 3,000 and 4500 calories above and beyond the 1100 that is my daily burn.

    that pretty much matches the average burn on the three previous cross countries. Riding around locally where it is flat and somewhat windy, I averagebetween 300 and 400 calories an hour depending on the head winds and how hard I am puess shing to maintain 15 mph or above.

    I guess what I am trying to say is that if you know you are going to ride long and strong, you need to prehydrate for a day or tow ahead of time, which for me is daily since I ride 50 miles 24 times a week and do cardio 2 x 2 hours a week. I tend to eat whole foods on a fairly regular basis. On my trainig rides I consume a breakfast of oatmeal with dried fruit ad nuts and a banana before the ride, a banana, a cup of dried fruit and nuts, and a couple of gu gels. I carry one bottle of FRS and one of plain water After ride I eat a chocolate almond recovery drink, a sandwich of whole wheat bread, meat and cheese, a large salad and a piece of fruit.

    I also like Like bars which are basically dried fruit, nuts and honey and carry one or more of those as a back up on longer rides.

    Keep experimenting and you will find something which keeps you going but the longer the ride ad the harder you push, the harder it becomes to not build up a nutrtion deficit for the day.

    One other totally random thought... If you are bound on increasing distance, wisdom says that you shouldn't increase more than 10% a week so if you do 50 one week and 75 the next, you are pretty much going to feel it.
    marni
    Katy, Texas
    Trek Madone 6.5- "Red"
    Trek Pilot 5.2- " Bebe"


    "easily outrun by a chihuahua."

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,952
    Quote Originally Posted by BleeckerSt_Girl View Post
    I guess we are all different. I would have no problem with a corned beef sandwich on a ride. Many times I've had bacon and eggs or lox and eggs before a 50 mile ride....i always start with a nice breakfast. and a croissant and latte.
    It is always interesting to me reading threads of this type for it does bring home how different we all are. I typically have a large breakfast before a long hard ride or hard high intensity gym session - bacon and eggs or a frittata, something like that with something like sweet potato hash and coffee. For some odd reason I can't tolerate chicken before a longer ride if it is hot/humid - which is totally perplexing but there you are. Then again, I don't ride all that fast which probably allows my body to tolerate a wider range of food.

    I concur you aren't getting enough calories, but it sounds like you are already working on that.

    Marni - thanks for the recommendation on Like bars - I don't consume grain products or HCFS, but I've been looking for something that meets my needs that I can store in my Camelbak for emergencies. Stuff happens. I typically take nitrate-free beef jerky and a macadamia nut/dried cherry mix with me on the bike. I also have Salt Lick tablets with me. So far this seems to be working better than when I was still using blocks, gels and bars.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,352

    Re: 50 miles...is that all?

    @Marni, can I just say you're now my idol? If I can be half as fit in the next 5 - 10 years I'll be thrilled.
    2012 Jamis Quest Brooks B17 Blue
    2012 Jamis Dakar XC Comp SI Ldy Gel
    2013 Electra Verse

  14. #29
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Katy, Texas
    Posts
    1,828
    karens, oh la! you flatter me. About seven years ago I had a "come to Jesus " moment that said either I was going to resign my life to a recliner and chocolate covered cherries or do something about my weight and health. Fortunately I made the right choice and started riding a bike. The rest has been based on the theory of "move it or lose it." Biking has given me my life back- literally and mentally. These days its a good day if I get out of bed without shifting the coffin lid.
    marni
    Katy, Texas
    Trek Madone 6.5- "Red"
    Trek Pilot 5.2- " Bebe"


    "easily outrun by a chihuahua."

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,352
    Quote Originally Posted by marni View Post
    karens, oh la! you flatter me. About seven years ago I had a "come to Jesus " moment that said either I was going to resign my life to a recliner and chocolate covered cherries or do something about my weight and health. Fortunately I made the right choice and started riding a bike. The rest has been based on the theory of "move it or lose it." Biking has given me my life back- literally and mentally. These days its a good day if I get out of bed without shifting the coffin lid.
    I had the same "Come to Jesus" moment this January. I'm 42 and when I started I was 5'3 and 200 lbs. I'm still 42 (and 5'3) but I'm down to 140 lbs. I'd still like to lose 10 more pounds. When I started I couldn't stay on the elliptical more than 5 minutes, now an hour is easy. However, the bike and fitness is still kicking my rear. I find endurance on the MTB much easier than the road bike. 20 miles at around 13/14 mph is the most I can do. I very much admire your endurance.
    2012 Jamis Quest Brooks B17 Blue
    2012 Jamis Dakar XC Comp SI Ldy Gel
    2013 Electra Verse

 

 

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