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  1. #46
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    70

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    Does anybody have the experience , or know if sunscreen goes bad from one year to the next? I actually think I've developed an allergic reaction to sunscreen on my face, as my sinuses get really sickly feeling and I just feel like I've got to wash it all off my face. Not breakouts, but beneath the skin, in sinus (behind eyes feeling) about a couple hours after applying it. I bought it fresh only last summer, Neutrogena brand, both the face moisturizer with 15, and the 45 sunblock. I really am quite freaked as I finally settled a couple years ago on thinkin Neutrogena was 'my brand', having never felt this reaction so severely before. But it's downright unbearable now.

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    355

    So, one thing you have to understand is that there is a UVA/UVB spectrum. Titanium dioxide is very good in the UVB spectrum, but just covers a small portion of the UVA spectrum. Regulations in the US allow manufacturers to say it is broad spectrum. This is why you have to be so careful about picking a sunscreen.
    Thank you, Mary--really valuable and helpful info...

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Branford, CT
    Posts
    737
    Just read this:
    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/36832300...in_and_beauty/

    Kind of scary that there's no regulation or standards. Also didn't realize that many sunblocks didn't work on UVA, which is what causes wrinkles. I admit I thought that the SPF numbers were exponential and was really surprised to see how small of a difference there was between 30 and 15.

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    360
    Thanks for the article...I was about to look for something along the same lines.

    The US historically has really only been concerned with UVB rays (the ones that burn you. That is all the SPF rating refers to. Many European sunscreens offer and additional rating system for UVA. There sunscreens have an SPF rating and a PA rating (the uva protection) it will be PA +, ++, +++ or ++++.

    Also, there are many ingredients that are not photo stable (which is ridiculous in a sunscreen) So you either have to make sure there is something to stabilize the ingredients or it contains a sunblock that is photo stable.

    My husband thinks that it is hilarious that for years, I had my friend ship me contraband sunscreen from europe (the fda hadn't approved the sunblock)
    Mary
    ~Strong and content, I travel the open road.~



    http://www.the3day.org/goto/mary.aguirre

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,889
    Quote Originally Posted by NoNo View Post
    Just read this:
    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/36832300...in_and_beauty/

    Kind of scary that there's no regulation or standards. Also didn't realize that many sunblocks didn't work on UVA, which is what causes wrinkles. I admit I thought that the SPF numbers were exponential and was really surprised to see how small of a difference there was between 30 and 15.
    Thanks for the article, and I found that small difference between the SPF numbers enlightening. It sounds like I should go for a physical sunblock
    This has confirmed my choice of a physical sunblock over a chemical one. It was quite a shock to read that there is no regulation on this in the US...

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    69
    http://www.canada.com/mobile/iphone/...f-e2db80d172b5

    Don't have to get it in Europe. Canada has good sunscreen too. My Derm recommended ombrelle

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,501
    When we were in Italy in '02, the only time I've bought sunblock in Europe, it only went up to #20. In pidgin Italian and sign language I tried to ask for a higher SPF; the store clerk told me 20 was the "max" and that with my slightly olive skin I didn't need it anyway.


    ETA: Hermitgirl, yes, the chemical sunblocks do expire, and the package should have an expiration date on it.

    IME though, Neutrogena products of any kind are some of the nastiest things out there. I can't put anything Neutrogena on my skin without a major breakout. I just bought a tube of Badger and so far so good.
    Last edited by OakLeaf; 05-03-2010 at 04:54 PM.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    4,516
    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    I just bought a tube of Badger and so far so good.
    Thanks for the feedback - I keep meaning to pick some up!
    Most days in life don't stand out, But life's about those days that will...

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    360
    Quote Originally Posted by snowroo View Post
    http://www.canada.com/mobile/iphone/...f-e2db80d172b5

    Don't have to get it in Europe. Canada has good sunscreen too. My Derm recommended ombrelle
    The sunscreen that I have used for years has Mexoryl in it. It is made by La Roche Posey.
    Mary
    ~Strong and content, I travel the open road.~



    http://www.the3day.org/goto/mary.aguirre

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    70
    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    ETA: Hermitgirl, yes, the chemical sunblocks do expire, and the package should have an expiration date on it.

    IME though, Neutrogena products of any kind are some of the nastiest things out there. I can't put anything Neutrogena on my skin without a major breakout. I just bought a tube of Badger and so far so good.
    THANK YOU ! This Badger stuff, is it hypo alergenic, or what?

  11. #56
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,501
    Here's their ingredient list; click on the FAQ and the technical page for more information about micronized zinc oxide.

    The label calls it "lightly scented," but I would say the lavender fragrance is fairly strong, so if that bothers you, be forewarned.

    I only just started using it, but haven't had any problems with it so far, and my facial skin is super sensitive.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,889
    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    Here's their ingredient list; click on the FAQ and the technical page for more information about micronized zinc oxide.

    The label calls it "lightly scented," but I would say the lavender fragrance is fairly strong, so if that bothers you, be forewarned.

    I only just started using it, but haven't had any problems with it so far, and my facial skin is super sensitive.
    Do you use this for more than your face and does it noticeably whiten your skin? Thanks!

  13. #58
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,501
    I only regularly put sunblock on my nose and the back of my neck, maybe a little across my cheekbones and ears. Badger is based on olive oil and beeswax, so it's definitely possible that it would be too heavy to put on your arms or back if overheating is a problem for you. Is that why you were asking about putting it somewhere besides my face?

    As for whitening... a little bit. According to their FAQ, the zinc oxide particles in Badger sunblock are for the most part larger than what's technically considered nanoparticles, although there's some overlap in the 70-100 nm range. So it's definitely not like the old-style clown-nose zinc oxide preparations; I would say the appearance is more like wearing makeup that's a shade too light for my skin.



    Also, poking around Badger's website, I see they now have an unscented version. Men may prefer this too.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  14. #59
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,889
    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    I only regularly put sunblock on my nose and the back of my neck, maybe a little across my cheekbones and ears. Badger is based on olive oil and beeswax, so it's definitely possible that it would be too heavy to put on your arms or back if overheating is a problem for you. Is that why you were asking about putting it somewhere besides my face?

    As for whitening... a little bit. According to their FAQ, the zinc oxide particles in Badger sunblock are for the most part larger than what's technically considered nanoparticles, although there's some overlap in the 70-100 nm range. So it's definitely not like the old-style clown-nose zinc oxide preparations; I would say the appearance is more like wearing makeup that's a shade too light for my skin.



    Also, poking around Badger's website, I see they now have an unscented version. Men may prefer this too.
    I was just looking at their website after posting my question. I asked about your use of this because I am not used to using sunscreen at all - typically I've just avoided the sun and want to find a good non-chemical sunscreen that I can use all over. I am unsure about overheating related to this, which was part of my question

    This does seem a more affordable option, though of course there isn't an inexpensive, and good, physical sunscreen. Not that I can find at least. I suspect that I will try this one, Total Block and Skinseuticals (not at the same time) to see which my skin is happiest with. I just do not tan, I just burn...and burn...and...I will use Coppertone until I try one of these products. I don't think I can purchase them locally.

  15. #60
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,501
    Quote Originally Posted by Catrin View Post
    I don't think I can purchase them locally.
    Badger Balm is a pretty popular brand. If your local natural food store doesn't already stock the sunblock (or doesn't have the kind you want to try), I'd be very surprised if they wouldn't order some for you. Don't know how you feel about Whole Foods, but I see both their Indy stores are clear the north end and not very close to you, anyway.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

 

 

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