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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    WA, Australia
    Posts
    3,292

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    [QUOTE AllezGirl]I now will put my name and address on stuff, because I don't carry ID...never actually thought about it since I bike locally. But, have to do it now. Great suggestion

    I made photocopys of my ID and health insurance card and keep one in the seat wedge on each of my bikes.[/QUOTE]

    AllezGirl - I have just recently received my RoadID in the mail and it is a great way to carry all your details on you. I have the one that goes around your neck on a chain but there are many other versions. Great idea if you happen to become separated from your bike and your photocopied ID.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Bridgeport, PA
    Posts
    232
    I just saw their website the other day and plan to order one too! Great product!

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    North San Diego County
    Posts
    52
    Most of my riding is solo.

    One of the routes I take is kind of off the beaten path so to speak, but it's also a very heavily traveled route during daylight hours, so I'm not really alone out there. The only times of day I would NOT take this route is before dawn or after sunset. It goes through some wetlands along the banks of a river, and lots of transients like to make camp there under the roadway bridges. There's plenty of places for people to hide and pop out, and while nothing has happened, that's not to say it *couldn't* happen. I just try to zoom through the most remote portion as quickly as possible, and keep a close "feel" on my surroundings.

    I used to ride solo through the outlaying hills in my area (Elfin Forest for those familiar with San Diego County) but it occurred to me that even IF I am careful, all it would take is one car to shoot me off the road and into oblivion. Places like that are much safer in groups or at least with one other person. There's something to be said about riding in a large enough group that cars have to wait for you to pass before they can.

    I don't do anything *consciously* in particular to protect myself other than staying in well-traveled areas, and what many of the others have posted. Some things I do is if it's an unfamiliar route, if possible I'll scope it out in my car first so I know where I'm going and what to expect. I bring my cellphone and keep it within easy reach, patch kit, air cartridges, and sometimes a snack in case of emergency, but don't keep a pocketknife with me. I have thought about it, especially in the River Trail area, but for the hundreds of times I've ridden through there, I recognize the same folks, over and over. I know better than to get comfortable and complacent, but women run solo out there. I'm on a bike; which is an easier target? I have this idea that the faster I go the less of a target I am.
    Last edited by nicolezoie; 08-27-2005 at 04:09 PM.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Niagara Region, ON
    Posts
    5
    I saw the ads for RoadID in magazines, but found something cheaper.

    On EBay, I searched for pet id tags, or similar. I found a seller with more than a dozen styles of tags including ones that look identical to the metal part of RoadID.

    The tags don't come with bands, but you can make your own. The cost of 3 tags was less than US$10 (incl. shipping) and included engraving - I have my name, hometown, and two emergency contact numbers on each tag.

    I made up a wrist band with some elastic and wear it all the time when riding.
    Last edited by ironic_chef; 08-27-2005 at 10:32 PM.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    BC, Canada
    Posts
    38
    Quote Originally Posted by Blanche
    I now wear what I call my "commando belt." It's a fanny pack with 2 canisters of pepper spray in holsters on each side. I always have my cell phone on, clipped to the belt, not inside the pack where I would have to fumble with it...and I have my husband's phone number up so all I have to do is push one button. The water bottle full of amonia as a back up. I call my husband before I leave and again when I return. I now will put my name and address on stuff, because I don't carry ID...never actually thought about it since I bike locally. But, have to do it now. Great suggestion.

    Also, always before I go out, I think about where everything is and if I have to, I practice getting to it, so I won't forget. I will NEVER forget how to use a cell again, or be casual about my safety.
    If you have 911 in your area, it might be a good idea to program them in if you have one button memory dial on your phone. And don't some phones even let you call 911 when the keypad is are locked? That way you're getting to help faster than if you have to call your husband who may have to call help while getting out to you.

    Like Trek420, I too am a single parent of a dog, so I often go on rides with no one knowing where I'm going or my route. I mix up the route every now and then, because I have this idea that if I consistently ride solo on the same route some weirdo could learn my route and lay in wait! My imagination is too good. Plus I like variety.

    For long solo mtb rides, the dog comes with me, and for road rides, I stick to busier roads, or ones frequented by other road riders. I always carry my drivers license, medical card, a bit of cash, and my cell phone. I've taken a basic what-parts-to-hit self defence course, and after living in a bad area for a little while, I have no problem with being REALLY rude and offputting to get creepy people away from me. Being loud is important if you feel you're in danger - draw attention to yourself and learn to let out that inner b*tch.

    I've been thinking of getting one of those cage rocket thingies that go in your water bottle holder, although that would mean figuring out where to put another bottle holder. Still, everything would be right there and easy to get at.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pendleton, OR
    Posts
    782
    Well, y'all might not believe this one, but I was accosted by a man in one of those motorized wheelchairs! I was riding down a 2-lane, one-way street in our small town 2 blocks from Main St. It was maybe 4 pm. This fellow in his wheelchair was going the wrong way on the street in the street--not on the sidewalk. When he saw me, he made a diagonal line across the street right toward me with a pretty definite leer and made some crack like "Hey, baby." Fortunately those contraptions aren't known for speed. As there was no traffic, I outmanuevered him. I kept wondering what he would have done if he'd "gotten" me. I mean, the man apparently couldn't walk! I'd have probably been thrown in jail if I'd have pepper sprayed him! What's next???

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    5,316

    protection whilst biking

    When i go for my morning rides (almost dawn but not quite) I put my cell phone and my wallet in my camelback so if i do end up in an awkward sit at least i can ring my other half or someone can figure out who i am if i'm knocked off my bike. Ian knows when i'm going biking but i feel safe out there.

    The good thing about my bike rides is they're along the train lines and have memorized the routes I take and any wierd areas to avoid. I haven't come accross any idiots on the bike paths in perth yet!

    One more thing. If you have or want to put an emergency contact, put the person's name as "George-ICE(in case of emergency)".

    c

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    3,099
    another lesson I learned while running: vary your route. Don't follow the same path/direction/time every time you go out. If someone has evil intentions they'll learn your route and then find the spot to "lay in wait" as it were. Sometimes it may be something as simple as riding your route backwards several days a week or leaving 5 mins earlier/10 mins later etc.
    Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, champagne in one hand, strawberries in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming: "Yeah Baby! What a Ride!"

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Santa Barbara
    Posts
    13
    I'm concerned about the responses that indicate they feel that having a cell phone or showing a pepper spray canister will help. I wouldn't like to rely on that myself. In fact, with pepper spray, you run the risk of their taking it from you and using it on you. Better just to spray them and ask questions later, imo. Wonder if we could come up with a pepper spray canister holder for just under the top tube?

    I've carried pepper spray on my keychain for a decade. Never have had to use it, and don't have any bad experiences that lead to it. I just feel it is a world we need to be prepared for these days. Rather than being scared, I'd just say: accept reality and be prepared, keep your eyes open. Stay healthy everyone!

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    2,543
    I carry pepper spray and cell phone when I ride alone as well. I also let my husband know exactly what route I'm taking and when I can be expected home.

    I had a similar incident last summer when a pickup truck with two creepy guys began to pace me and then immediately sped up as another car came up behind them. Then they turned around and started back towards me. Fortunately there were a few houses set back from the road. I rode up one of the driveways, parked my bike by their door and started taking of my gear, pretending that I lived there. The guys left. I called for back up and a friend came and got me.

    The next day I rode down that same street and someone had vandalized the road with very lewed drawings and threats. It probably wasn't connected with the guys in the pick-up, but it added to the creepiness.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    12
    Wow. I live in a pretty good neighborhood, but eventually I know I'll be riding further from home, and perhaps through some deserted and/or less than desirable areas. If I ever feel uncomfortable, rather than letting that put me off what I want to do, I'll get one of the fanny pack holsters for my Glock. I have a carry permit, but I'd make sure to go to the range often if I ever DO start carrying.

    I'm prior Military, so I'm pretty comfortable with guns. I haven't read "the other thread" someone else alluded to, so I hope this doesn't rub anyone the wrong way...

    The RoadID is a marvelous idea, too. I carry my little ID folder with my driver's license and a $20 in my Wedgie bag under my seat, but if someone takes the bike from me, I'm probably SOL. I do wear my cell phone on my waistband, so at least that's easy to get to.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    38
    I to carry pepperspray on my rides. Especially since most of my riding is very remote(one or two cars may pass me) and I never really know where I am going until I get on my bike. I always call a friend or my husband along the way and let them know where I'm at.
    The guys I ride with frown upon me when I ride alone in such remote areas, but it is the only place I like to ride.
    I to live in North San Diego and know the trail Nicolezoie is talking about. I had a flat on that trail, while riding alone, and I never had changed a tire so fast. I decided I will not ride that one alone.
    One time I decided I wanted to climb the back side of Polamar Mountain on my mountain bike, but I didn't want to do it alone. (The only cars we saw were ones that were stolen and dumped).So my husband volunteered to follow me in his truck. (Since he doesn't ride). My kids in tow-
    They had fun feeding me M&M's and water along the way.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    WA, Australia
    Posts
    3,292
    [QUOTE go gget em]So my husband volunteered to follow me in his truck. (Since he doesn't ride). My kids in tow-
    They had fun feeding me M&M's and water along the way.

    go gget em - thats so cute. I think if it was my boys passing the M&M's though I would be lucky to get any. Great way to tackle your ride and stay safe, good for you.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    5,316

    Protection

    Umm..this is getting a bit freaky..carrying a gun whilst riding???? Pepper spray???. Excuse me for being a bit ignorant but do you really need those two items?? Perhaps this is the Canadian/ New Zealander coming out in me...Remind me not to move to America...and bother ladies biking with guns...

    c

    no offense to anyone ok..this is just an observation....

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Traveling Nomad
    Posts
    6,763
    Quote Originally Posted by crazycanuck
    Umm..this is getting a bit freaky..carrying a gun whilst riding???? Pepper spray???. Excuse me for being a bit ignorant but do you really need those two items??
    I would never carry a gun, but I have carried pepper spray for years for dealing with dogs. I very rarely need it, but if one is very persistent and comes right up to my pedals in a threatening manner, by golly he's going to get a snoutful! It causes no permanent damage, just gives me enough chance to scoot away while the dog is rubbing his eyes in the grass. Don't get me wrong, I like dogs very much, have one myself, but being threatened by unfriendly, unrestrained ones while riding is scary and potentially dangerous, and I will do whatever it takes to protect myself.

    Unfortunately, I couldn't get to my pepper spray in time when I had my accident in April, despite the fact that it was mounted right on my handlebars - the dogs that ran right at me came out of nowhere way too fast. It might have saved me a broken pelvis if I could have used it.

    Emily
    Emily

    2011 Jamis Dakar XC "Toto" - Selle Italia Ldy Gel Flow
    2007 Trek Pilot 5.0 WSD "Gloria" - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow
    2004 Bike Friday Petite Pocket Crusoe - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow

 

 

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