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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Outside of Chicago
    Posts
    38

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    I have a B67-s and I tried it with it slightly tilted down, but that was putting too pressure on my wrists. I ended up putting it with a slight upward tilt, and as far back on the rails as it would allow. So far, no real pressure of the "girly bits" unless I hit a major bump, other than that it's all good. I barely notice that the saddle is there.
    Good luck, I bet you figure out a way to make it work. You must be tough, to be able to have a broken leg and not even know it!

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    226
    Quote Originally Posted by Melissa71 View Post
    I have a B67-s and I tried it with it slightly tilted down, but that was putting too pressure on my wrists. I ended up putting it with a slight upward tilt, and as far back on the rails as it would allow. So far, no real pressure of the "girly bits" unless I hit a major bump, other than that it's all good. I barely notice that the saddle is there.
    Good luck, I bet you figure out a way to make it work. You must be tough, to be able to have a broken leg and not even know it!
    It's all the positive comments about Brooks I've read on this forum and other places (and the fact that it looks so damn cool on my Jamis) that has me so committed to trying every possible thing to make it or another Brooks work.

    I've thought about the leg break many times wondering did I not complain?? My parents are both deceased so I can't ask them. The rule in my house was that if you weren't going to bleed to death, you didn't go to the doctor. I remember my mother picking gravel out of my knees and the huge scabs on my knees but guess they thought the pain was from that. The funny thing too is I remember I had to walk home pushing my bike, at least a couple of miles. The ortho doc that told me about it was amazed. He came in with the x-ray and said "who set your leg when you broke it, they did a lousy job", to which I replied "I've never broken my leg".

    He told me to I would never be able to run or ride without pain. True enough for running but just made changes on the bike and no problem. I love proving doctors wrong!
    "It is never too late to be what you might have been."

    http://www.loveofbikes.com

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    lost in my own thoughts
    Posts
    301
    Quote Originally Posted by SLash View Post
    Hi Modern,

    The thing that jumped out at me was the 1000 miles. The aged leather is supposed to have a shorter break in period, so that should help. Part of the reason I got the aged, guess I'm inpatient. I also liked the way it looked with my Aurora.

    How did you finally get the tilt adjusted? Is it tilted up or down? I rode a little tonight and again felt a little better so there's hope I think.

    What do you ride with on your Aurora?

    Thanks,

    Susan
    Susan,

    Well yeah 1000 miles seems like a lot, but I knew from all my research that you "earn" a Brooks saddle. The aged leather should break in - a few hundred miles sooner.

    As far as tilt, I adjusted it just high enough to keep me from sliding forward when I stop - but just low enough not to really "dig" into my girly bits. I also slid it back a few millimeters (really just a scooch or two - but that isn't a technical unit of measurement ) My seatpost on my 520 is a micro-adjust bontrager so it made it pretty easy to tweak angles. On my Aurora, I haven't found an adequate way to adjust the angles so I haven't bought a Brooks for it...yet.

    Currently I'm making use of the stock 09' saddle - which works fine for short distances or commutes. I've considered finding a Specialized Lithia (in Black)on eBay or something for it (I don't think they make it anymore) as I rode a Specialized and enjoyed the Lithia quite a bit. I've considered a Selle An-Atomica Watershed Leather saddle, a Selle San Marco Rolls in Brown Suede, and quite a few others. Indecisive basically.

    Good luck with tweaking your Brooks. Part of it is just getting used to the "feel of a Brooks."
    "Things look different from the seat of a bike carrying a sleeping bag with a cold beer tucked inside." ~Jim Malusa
    2009 Trek 520-Brooks B-17 Special in Antique Brown
    2010 Surly Long Haul Trucker-Brooks B-17 Standard in Black
    1983 Fuji Espree Single Speed-Brooks B17 British Racing Green

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    226
    MC,

    I knew from all my research that you "earn" a Brooks saddle
    That seems to describe the Brooks process perfectly.

    Thanks for the specifics on how you adjusted it. I've been ready to go ride now for 2 hours + but having to delay because of rain/threatening rain, so I'm still sitting here in my bike shorts and jersey typing away.

    I want to get at least 20 miles today in my bike shorts (as opposed to regular shorts... just to be clear )so I can see if it continues to feel better/kinda good (high praise for a new Brooks, right) and if not maybe make a few tweaks of the type you mentioned.

    Didn't know about the saddles you mentioned and looked them up. The Selle An-Atomica Watershed Leather saddle could be a good possibility. Just what I need more options.

    Susan
    "It is never too late to be what you might have been."

    http://www.loveofbikes.com

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    foothills of the Ozarks aka Tornado Alley
    Posts
    4,193
    Quote Originally Posted by SLash View Post
    Because my sitbones seem supported I'm hopeful the Brooks will work once I get the fit dialed in....Initially I planned to order the "regular" because in my research here I read about the issue of not being able to slide back enough because of the shorter rails.
    I cannot emphasize enough the importance of sitting whilst being fully supported by your sitbones rather than the pelvic floor. You'll be paying a price if you ride unsupported. What's nice about the S model is that it forces you to sit back further on the saddle rather than ride on the nose.

    Since the rails run short on Brooks saddles, one suggestion I can make is to consider a setback seatpost with a looong setback. But first I would suggest you lower the seatpost 2-3 mm and try that. Then as you break in the saddle you can raise your seatpost little by little. (It might be handy to switch to a quick release collar during the break in of your saddle so you can adjust it quickly on the fly. Once you find the right heighth, mark it on the seatpost. )

    And as for breaking it in faster, I found putting it on the bike that I sit the most upright will break it in faster. My Brooks get broken in on my mountain bike and then I switch it to the road bike.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    foothills of the Ozarks aka Tornado Alley
    Posts
    4,193
    Oh, one more thing. Specialized makes an adjustable stem.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    226
    Sundial,

    Excellent information and suggestions, thank you.

    I rode today and for the first 10 miles I just focused on what worked, what didn't, where the pain was, where it wasn't, and on and on. I paid attention to my hands and whether I felt I was disproportianately supporting myself on my hands. I did. I also noticed I wanted to slide back.

    So I stopped, adjusted the nose up ever so slightly (while I was cursing the *^%# wind!) and then slid the saddle back about 1/4 inch. I felt better but not good enough.

    I just don't feel "one with the bike" like I feel when I ride my Scott and like I felt before I put the Brooks on this bike (Jamis). I am constantly aware of how I am feeling and it's not good! I feel like I used too when I was just getting my base miles - like it is all such an effort. I haven't felt that way in a long time. I don't blame the Brooks, I think the saddle switch simply screwed up the fit that I got when I bought the bike so the next thing I plan to do is go this week and get re-fit.

    Other possible reasons: 1. I'm riding a much heavier, slower geomety bike (Jamis Aurora Elite vs all carbon Scott CR1 pro) 2. The shifting isn't nearly as good or smooth (poorly adjusted - which will get fixed this week -Shimano Tiagra vs Campy Centaur) so shifting is a struggle and hard to maintain a smooth and consistent pedal stroke.

    I think these things are part of the problem. Thoughts?

    Today I wondered if I need a longer saddle but the dilemma is I need the extra width of the S so couldn't go with a B17. I ride in the drops or the hoods mostly so don't think the B68 would be a good match.

    With what you said though maybe it's good I don't have the longer saddle so it forces me to sit at the back of it where I am more supported by sit bones.

    I'm 5'5" but more of my height is in my torso than my legs (inseam of just under 30") don't know if that is impacting any of this.

    It is all a mystery at this point. I expected the pain of the Brooks to be in the sit bones and it isn't. One other thing, I am beginning to believe that some of my discomfort is because of the padding in the front part of my bike shorts (Shebeest Triple S). I need the padding at the sit bones area but not in the crotch.

    Is anyone aware of bike shorts that have good padding, but focus it at the sit bones area rather than the front/soft tissue part of the short?

    Thanks to all of you for your help!
    "It is never too late to be what you might have been."

    http://www.loveofbikes.com

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Riding my Luna & Rivendell in the Hudson Valley, NY
    Posts
    8,403
    Quote Originally Posted by sundial View Post
    What's nice about the S model is that it forces you to sit back further on the saddle rather than ride on the nose.
    Since the rails run short on Brooks saddles, one suggestion I can make is to consider a setback seatpost with a looong setback.
    I know we all have different experiences, and I must relate my own experience, having ridden thousands of miles on both "S" model and non-S.
    The rails on the S model are about 1.5" shorter than the rails on the non S. Thus, if you position your saddle all the way back on its rails, the back edge of the S model was always more forward on the bike than my non-S model. For me, this put my center of gravity way too far forward and i had too much weight falling forward onto my hands. Just my own experience of course.

    Just as an interesting visual comparison of the "S" vs. the non-S Brooks saddles...

    Here is my Rivendell Rambouillet with its original B17S saddle when I first got the bike:


    And here is the same bike a couple years later with a B68 (not an "S" model), same seatpost:


    Note also how I initially had my saddle set pretty low when i first got my bike. It seemed so scary tall! lol!
    Last edited by BleeckerSt_Girl; 04-25-2010 at 06:55 PM.
    Lisa
    Our bikes...OurBikes...and my mountain dulcimer blog
    Ruby's Website and My blog
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Riding my Luna & Rivendell in the Hudson Valley, NY
    Posts
    8,403
    For what it's worth-
    I went from the B17S to the B17 so i could move the saddle back further. I had been feeling sort of like I was riding a unicycle. It helped a lot, but i eventually found that my sitbones were a bit too wide for the B17 anyway, they were too close to the side frame edges of the saddle, so I then switched to the B68 on both my bikes, which was as wide as they come. (I have very wide hips and sitbones to match) It's been heavenly ever since. i ride on the hoods and drops quite a bit and never have any problem with my B68 because of that. I am most comfortable when the saddle nose is tipped ever so slightly up from level.

    I personally found the B17S forced my whole body to be too far forward. The non-S with the longer rails, shoved all the way back, allowed me to get an inch and a half further back and I felt so much better balanced and off my hands.
    Incidentally, when we measured me carefully for my second bike, a custom Luna, we found my right thigh bone was a 1/2" longer than my left thigh bone.
    Last edited by BleeckerSt_Girl; 04-25-2010 at 07:17 PM.
    Lisa
    Our bikes...OurBikes...and my mountain dulcimer blog
    Ruby's Website and My blog
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    226
    Lisa,

    I went from the B17S to the B17 so i could move the saddle back further. I had been feeling sort of like I was riding a unicycle. It helped a lot, but i eventually found that my sitbones were a bit too wide for the B17 anyway, they were too close to the side frame edges of the saddle, so I then switched to the B68 on both my bikes, which was as wide as they come. (I have very wide hips and sitbones to match) It's been heavenly ever since. i ride on the hoods and drops quite a bit and never have any problem with my B68 because of that. I am most comfortable when the saddle nose is tipped ever so slightly up from level.
    I am so glad to hear that about the B68. Everything I've read (I know, you shouldn't believe everything you read) made me believe that the B68 is for upright "city" riding and not for longer distance drops/hoods riding.

    personally found the B17S forced my whole body to be too far forward. The non-S with the longer rails, shoved all the way back, allowed me to get an inch and a half further back and I felt so much better balanced and off my hands.
    I feel like my weight is too far forward too. If I end up with a B68 I will not get the S.

    After I get the re-fit with the B17, I'll ride and see if there is significant improvement. If not, I'll probably order the B68.

    BTW, I love your Rivendell. Amazing that it's the same seat post. Big difference with the 2 saddles.
    "It is never too late to be what you might have been."

    http://www.loveofbikes.com

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    foothills of the Ozarks aka Tornado Alley
    Posts
    4,193
    Quote Originally Posted by BleeckerSt_Girl View Post
    ...if you position your saddle all the way back on its rails...
    Lisa, I can see where you would have center of gravity issues with it shoved all the way back. What I strive to do with all my saddles is to have the rails centered over the seatpost, as I find this offers the best fit, and coincidentally, the best balance on the bike. On the bikes with the relaxed geometry I have to use a setback seatpost. On the bike with the more aggressive geometry, I have to use a zero setback seatpost.

    SLash, I remember with each new Brooks saddle the feeling of pressure in the hammock area of the saddle. It wasn't causing pain--just pressure. I took shorter rides initially until it was broken in--which was usually around 120 miles for me. Perhaps as you break in the saddle more it will become less of an issue and you'll feel "one" with the bike. I remember having to make several micro-adjustments up until it was broken in. The nose of the saddles are tilted just a hair up and the seatpost is lowered about an inch or so.

    If you have questions about the fit, call Wall Bike. They are more than happy to help their customers.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    226
    Quote Originally Posted by sundial View Post
    SLash, I remember with each new Brooks saddle the feeling of pressure in the hammock area of the saddle. It wasn't causing pain--just pressure. I took shorter rides initially until it was broken in--which was usually around 120 miles for me. Perhaps as you break in the saddle more it will become less of an issue and you'll feel "one" with the bike. I remember having to make several micro-adjustments up until it was broken in. The nose of the saddles are tilted just a hair up and the seatpost is lowered about an inch or so.

    If you have questions about the fit, call Wall Bike. They are more than happy to help their customers.
    I've emailed Bill several times and he's been a big help. Very nice guy.

    I think the padding in the shorts I wear (Shebeest Triple S) makes what would be pressure into pain (dull pain while on the bike but last night 4 hours after ride it still hurt-still dull). I'm considering giving my shorts a *trim* in the pad area at the front just to see if it will help. The way I look at it I have nothing to lose by at least trying it on one pair.

    I'm waiting to hear from the lbs I bought my bike to see when they can get me in for a re-fit. Today I'm having a lot of pain (pinched nerve type pain) in my right shoulder/shoulder blade area that I wasn't having before. Think it's due to my ride yesterday. Granted, it was windy as hell so maybe that's part of it.? After I get fitted and have a chance to ride again, I'll re-evaluate and maybe call Bill at that point. I'm hoping for a *small* miracle after I get my fit adjusted. Plus, as you point out the breaking in process should give me some relief in time. I hope I see some improvement quickly.

    Thanks for the tips.
    "It is never too late to be what you might have been."

    http://www.loveofbikes.com

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Beautiful NW or Left Coast
    Posts
    5,619
    before you cut up your shorts, don't you have anything else you could wear? Even a pair of cotton slacks, just to see?
    I like Bikes - Mimi
    Watercolor Blog

    Davidson Custom Bike - Cavaletta
    Dahon 2009 Sport - Luna
    Old Raleigh Mixte - Mitzi

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    226
    Quote Originally Posted by Biciclista View Post
    before you cut up your shorts, don't you have anything else you could wear? Even a pair of cotton slacks, just to see?
    I've ridden twice in knee length cargo type shorts (regular shorts not bike) and it felt more comfortable than my bike shorts. One pair of my shebeest shorts is pretty worn so those are the ones I would experiment on.

    I wouldn't remove the pad just thin it some... as in take a little off the top.
    "It is never too late to be what you might have been."

    http://www.loveofbikes.com

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    50
    I recently saw bike shorts with a pad that was split down the middle. I wonder if that would help?

 

 

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