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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    5

    700c to 650c conversion Part 2

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    Cut off all but around two inches of the soon to be denuded bumps tire section. Trim the bumps off the inside tube (the section without the bead now) using the model saw or Xacto or whatever you want. You only need to trim the bumps from a couple of inches. You could get away without trimming anything but it makes for a better fit. Then, if you are a bit of a perfectionist, flatten out the remaining bits with the Dremel. Photos 13 - 17 Click image for larger version. 

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    Fit the two ends together so that the two sets of cut bead ends touch. Then, glue the two ends together using hot glue. Hot glue is great because it can be remelted if you make a mistake and stays flexible. I just put hot glue on the denuded tread and then reheated it with the heat gun before fitting the tire sections together again. Photos 18 - 22 Click image for larger version. 

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    Put a 650c tube into the incomplete tire and fit it onto a 650c rim. It's not very neat looking, yet. Make sure the bead is inside the hooked rim and inflate the tire with about 10 lbs. pressure. If it's too loose, then take it off, reheat it and slide the two sections together more tightly. You may need to cut some bead off if you made it too loose to start. Photos 23 - 24 Click image for larger version. 

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    It fits OK. Deflate it, remove the tire and tube. reinforce the seams using cut pieces of nylon cloth (or cotton or whatever) glued into the inside of the tire with the Barge cement. Cover the seems at the butt ends of the two beads and the end of the tire overlaps. Photos 25 - 26 Click image for larger version. 

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    Let the glue dry for an hour or so. Use the spare time to try and remove all the glue from your fingers. Good luck with that. Then, remount the tire onto the rim and verify it fits. Inflate the tire again to maybe 15 lbs. The expanding tube will help set the glue. Let it sit for maybe 10 minutes like that.

    Take off the tire, remove the tube and drill a single hole through both sections of tire using the 7/64" bit. Try not to drill your hand. Choose a point maybe 1 inch back from the cut end of the top section and in between the bigger knobs. Photos 27 - 28 Click image for larger version. 

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    See Part three.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    5
    Now, the trickiest part. Take the short #3 metric screw and screw it into the hole. The screw should be just long enough that the end begins peaking out of the inside of the tire. Then, line up the box nut with the screw end and tighten the screw. You may need to do the lining up by touch - you should be able to feel when the box nuts end is on the top of the screw end. Tighten down the screw. As you do that, the sharp tangs will embed into the tire. This makes a really sturdy seam that won't separate. I then added a drop of Barge to the end of the screw to make sure it will never loosen up. Photos 29 - 30 Click image for larger version. 

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    I added a strip of Mr. Tuffy to the inside of the entire tire but you don't need to do that. Insert tube, mount it onto the rim making sure the bead is seated correctly and inflate to 60 lbs. make another tire and then put them onto the bike.

    My wife has used these for commuting and cx and they work great. The only little irritation is that the tires make a sound every time the seam passes over the ground. Any bump is minimal. See the rest of the photos. Click image for larger version. 

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    Hopefully I numbered the photos correctly and didn't miss anything.

    Good luck. It really works.[/B]

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,465
    Quote Originally Posted by whsh93a View Post
    Cut off all but around two inches of the soon to be denuded bumps tire section. Trim the bumps off the inside tube (the section without the bead now) using the model saw or Xacto or whatever you want. You only need to trim the bumps from a couple of inches. You could get away without trimming anything but it makes for a better fit. Then, if you are a bit of a perfectionist, flatten out the remaining bits with the Dremel. Photos 13 - 17 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	13-17a.jpg 
Views:	117 
Size:	66.2 KB 
ID:	17873

    Fit the two ends together so that the two sets of cut bead ends touch. Then, glue the two ends together using hot glue. Hot glue is great because it can be remelted if you make a mistake and stays flexible. I just put hot glue on the denuded tread and then reheated it with the heat gun before fitting the tire sections together again. Photos 18 - 22 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	18-22A.jpg 
Views:	120 
Size:	55.1 KB 
ID:	17874

    Put a 650c tube into the incomplete tire and fit it onto a 650c rim. It's not very neat looking, yet. Make sure the bead is inside the hooked rim and inflate the tire with about 10 lbs. pressure. If it's too loose, then take it off, reheat it and slide the two sections together more tightly. You may need to cut some bead off if you made it too loose to start. Photos 23 - 24 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	23-24a.jpg 
Views:	121 
Size:	25.0 KB 
ID:	17875

    It fits OK. Deflate it, remove the tire and tube. reinforce the seams using cut pieces of nylon cloth (or cotton or whatever) glued into the inside of the tire with the Barge cement. Cover the seems at the butt ends of the two beads and the end of the tire overlaps. Photos 25 - 26 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	25-26a.jpg 
Views:	116 
Size:	39.0 KB 
ID:	17876

    Let the glue dry for an hour or so. Use the spare time to try and remove all the glue from your fingers. Good luck with that. Then, remount the tire onto the rim and verify it fits. Inflate the tire again to maybe 15 lbs. The expanding tube will help set the glue. Let it sit for maybe 10 minutes like that.

    Take off the tire, remove the tube and drill a single hole through both sections of tire using the 7/64" bit. Try not to drill your hand. Choose a point maybe 1 inch back from the cut end of the top section and in between the bigger knobs. Photos 27 - 28 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	27-28a.jpg 
Views:	120 
Size:	45.7 KB 
ID:	17877

    See Part three.

    Looks like you skipped Part 3.

    Interesting project, though. I'd want to hear how well the tire holds up. I think someone could take this idea to a competent builder if they were interested.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    Looks like you skipped Part 3.

    Interesting project, though. I'd want to hear how well the tire holds up. I think someone could take this idea to a competent builder if they were interested.
    =========================
    I posted part three three times and each time I received a message that it needed to be approved by the webmaster or something. I think I saved it. I'll try again.

    Here's a photo of my wife just yesterday using the tires. Click image for larger version. 

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  5. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    5

    700c to 650c conversion Part 3

    Let's try it again...

    Now, the trickiest part. Take the short #3 metric screw and screw it into the hole. The screw should be just long enough that the end begins peaking out of the inside of the tire. Then, line up the box nut with the screw end and tighten the screw. You may need to do the lining up by touch - you should be able to feel when the box nuts end is on the top of the screw end. Tighten down the screw. As you do that, the sharp tangs will embed into the tire. This makes a really sturdy seam that won't separate. I then added a drop of Barge to the end of the screw to make sure it will never loosen up. Photos 29 - 30 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	29-30a.jpg 
Views:	119 
Size:	43.4 KB 
ID:	17888

    I added a strip of Mr. Tuffy to the inside of the entire tire but you don't need to do that. Insert tube, mount it onto the rim making sure the bead is seated correctly and inflate to 60 lbs. make another tire and then put them onto the bike.

    My wife has used these for commuting and cx and they work great. The only little irritation is that the tires make a sound every time the seam passes over the ground. Any bump is minimal. See the rest of the photos. Click image for larger version. 

Name:	31-32a.jpg 
Views:	122 
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ID:	17889

    Hopefully I numbered the photos correctly and didn't miss anything.

    Good luck. It really works.

    PS - Make sure the tire fits very tightly onto the rim. CX uses pretty low pressure. When commuting, tire pressure is higher and the bead grabs the rim more solidly.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by whsh93a; 11-16-2015 at 09:36 PM.

 

 

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