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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Metro-West, MA
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    118

    Riding With Dislocated Shoulder

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    Took a nasty tumble skiing, need to get back into shape. Anyone ride road or mountain with a dislocated shoulder?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    1,645
    I had a pretty bad shoulder strain many years ago (dragonboat racing) and was still able to ride a mountain bike, but did not venture off road very much. I couldn't afford my own bike, so I borrowed from friends, and the bikes were typically a bit large for me. So between the long reach and wanting to take care of my shoulder, I relied a LOT on core strength to be able to handle the bike.

    I should note that I was in constant pain at the time, cycling didn't hurt as much as other activities, and I had yet to learn to really listen to my body when it was injured.

    There are some threads on here about recumbent bikes that would probably be worth reading. Could be a good option if you are looking at a long recovery.

    Every body and every injury is different. It might be worth getting on a stationary bike or a bike on a trainer first to see how confident you feel with the shoulder, before taking a bike out on the road or trail.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,501
    Never dislocated mine, but sprained it pretty badly 38 years ago and it's never been right. And I know several people who are still rehabbing shoulder injuries. It's an extremely complex joint and I think you really ought to stick closely to your PT's advice for your activities...
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    I'm the only one allowed to whine
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    10,557
    What does your doctor say?

    I love working with folks who have dislocated (not strained or sprained) their shoulders... over and over and over again. They have these intense shoulder surgeries, their arms are sewn down (cuz that's the only way to sew them on anymore) and they look at me with teary mournful eyes and say, "I wish I'd listened to my doctor. I can't believe just picking up my cat after my dislocation was enough to destroy my shoulder for the rest of my life."

    Someday I will videotape one of them; the look of misery and regret and lost hopes plastered across their despairing faces will be so educational for others.

    (I've got two right now who had to have reverse shoulder arthroplasties due to re-dislocation. They will never be able to return to their sports. Ever. The hardware in their shoulders holding their arms on only goes so far. They will be lucky if they can comb their hair when all is over. And boy, is it over now. Don't be that person. I get tired of watching the weeping.)
    "If Americans want to live the American Dream, they should go to Denmark." - Richard Wilkinson

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Marin County CA
    Posts
    5,936
    I would listen to knott (and your doctor/pt) on this.

    what about a stationary trainer or spin class with your arm immobilized for now? i shattered my scapula a couple of years ago and the trainer w/an immobilizing sling kept me fit til I could ride again. and that first ride was vomit inducingly painful - every slight bump. dont over do it. your injury actually has alot worse downside and possible lasting effects than mine. my shoulder crackles like popcorn now and I cant keep a bra strap up on that side. you could end up with redislocation or worse. be careful.
    Sarah

    When it's easy, ride hard; when it's hard, ride easy.


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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
    Posts
    6,984
    Quote Originally Posted by KnottedYet View Post
    What does your doctor say?

    I love working with folks who have dislocated (not strained or sprained) their shoulders... over and over and over again. They have these intense shoulder surgeries, their arms are sewn down (cuz that's the only way to sew them on anymore) and they look at me with teary mournful eyes and say, "I wish I'd listened to my doctor. I can't believe just picking up my cat after my dislocation was enough to destroy my shoulder for the rest of my life."

    Someday I will videotape one of them; the look of misery and regret and lost hopes plastered across their despairing faces will be so educational for others.

    (I've got two right now who had to have reverse shoulder arthroplasties due to re-dislocation. They will never be able to return to their sports. Ever. The hardware in their shoulders holding their arms on only goes so far. They will be lucky if they can comb their hair when all is over. And boy, is it over now. Don't be that person. I get tired of watching the weeping.)
    What a learning lesson to witness this, Knotted.
    I've never dislocated a shoulder. My partner did in a farming accident several decades ago. He occasionally experiences some pain and does have to do some exercises recommended by a physiotherapist.

    A sister had a serious should /upper back muscles sprain/strain that she couldn't lift her baby son from his crib. It was from a rowing machine that she had been using for several months. Took her a long time to rehab herself and that injury pulled her post-partum depression down further at that time. She found yoga over a 2 yr. period her road to rehab.
    My Personal blog on cycling & other favourite passions.
    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know whatís in a personís heart.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Metro-West, MA
    Posts
    118
    Thanks for the heads up on bumps !
    It has been a month, I just started to stationary bike upright and have a tone of stretch band exercises to do.
    My Doc basicly said you can start to ease into your activities, however if you fall again on it, your mine ....

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    1,645
    Yes, Knott is right. Listen to your Doc & PTs -- last thing you want to do is make it worse. Err on the side of caution.

    Just being able to do normal life activities sans pain might be a good goal for a little while . . . wishing you a smooth healing & rehab process!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    DE
    Posts
    1,209
    Having undergone 5 months of intense PT 3x/week, and an open AC decompression all I can say is LISTEN TO THE DOCTOR. I would not want to relive this period for anything. Do NOT jeapordize your recovery or your shoulder while it's healing. Just say "No."

    Knott was right when she talked about her patient that might never be able to comb her hair - I have been there, done that, got that T-shirt. I got past that stage, but putting my hand on top of my head was impossible for about 3 months and I can barely do it now.
    Last edited by withm; 02-22-2010 at 01:41 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Appling, GA
    Posts
    275
    Several years ago my husband had a bad motocross wreck. He broke his collar bone, had a serious concussion and his leg was temporarily paralyzed from the knee down.
    Two weeks after the accident he started riding his spin bike. Clipped into the pedals, he spun with the good leg and the other went along for the ride. He supported himself with his good arm and added weight to the injured side as he healed. He was able to safely exercise until he was healthy enough to get back on the road. An unexpected obstacle and jolt could have aggravated his injuries and set back his recovery not to mention the danger of riding with a compromised body that may not be prepared to react appropriately when presented with said obstacle.
    Have you thought about starting out on a spin bike?

 

 

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