Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 23 of 23

Thread: Moose

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,336

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    Quote Originally Posted by newfsmith View Post
    Wait a minute, I thought it was always the " 'assachusetts" drivers that took care of the speeding in NH and ME.
    I've always hated driving long distance on any highway because inevitably everyone zooms past me even when I'm doing 10-20% over the limit. Then I read this joke by Jeff Foxworthy about Canadians driving way too fast, so I guess we do.

    I remember one time in the snow in the dusk, I was trying so hard to follow the others so I can have their tail lights as a guide, but they just bomb down the highway like their pants were on fire.


    p.s. I had always heard that hitting a moose by car is pretty much fatal as you knock them out on their skinny legs and their body crashes onto the hood of the car, crushing the occupants.


    p.p.s. anyone here ever heard of Fergus the Forager? He pretty much lives off the land, and that includes eating fresh roadkill. If I were an animal who had the bad luck of being killed by a car, I'd want my flesh to go to good use.

    I also found this on google while searching for Fergus: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zMo1j4G7EM

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    around Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,250

    Moose Stroganoff?

    I don't have experience in cooking moose, but I have cooked elk - used to get 15 lbs of elk meat for Christmas every year from a neighbor. Anyway, I found that I could substitute elk for beef in most recipies EXCEPT where one might consider the sauce "delicate". Lets just say Chinese broccoli elk (instead of broccoli beef) stir fry was not to be repeated.

    Elk Stroganoff was really tasty. So was elk chilli, elk stew, and the ever popular elk burgers.

    So I would guess that maybe moose would be the same for elk from what you've described. Elk meat is a bit stronger taste than your average beef cow, so delicate sauces would be overpowered by the meat taste. Happy cooking!
    Beth

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Looking at all the love there that's sleeping
    Posts
    4,172
    Quote Originally Posted by bmccasland View Post
    I don't have experience in cooking moose, but I have cooked elk - used to get 15 lbs of elk meat for Christmas every year from a neighbor. Anyway, I found that I could substitute elk for beef in most recipies EXCEPT where one might consider the sauce "delicate". Lets just say Chinese broccoli elk (instead of broccoli beef) stir fry was not to be repeated.

    Elk Stroganoff was really tasty. So was elk chilli, elk stew, and the ever popular elk burgers.

    So I would guess that maybe moose would be the same for elk from what you've described. Elk meat is a bit stronger taste than your average beef cow, so delicate sauces would be overpowered by the meat taste. Happy cooking!
    Oooo...good to know! I was considering "Moose and Broccoli" or some such stir fry type dish! thanks... I'm not sure I have a full pound of meat in the package. I'll have to check. The pieces are pretty thin and not "stew meat" chunks. I usually do stroganoff in the crock pot - but most recipes call for 2 lbs. of meat. I wonder if I could put it in the slow cooker with 1 pound of beef and mix it up some??

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    257
    This was a really timely thread for me as I too was given some moose- I think it is moose steaks and I was wondering about marinading them- thanks for the ideas
    The cure for anything is salt water;
    sweat, tears or the sea

    Isak Dinesen

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,336
    I was talking to the coworker who hunts moose and how he prepares his meat. He said he likes to roast it, but you have to do it in a clay baker, or at the very least a roasting pot with a lid to keep the moisture in.

    He gave me some ground moose meat today to try it out. I wonder if I can make shepherd's pie out of it??

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Aberystwyth, Wales
    Posts
    659
    Being Norwegian, and growing up with a neighbour who hunts moose, I've eaten a fair bit of it. Very tasty stuff! Works brilliantly in slow cooked stews and stroganoff type things. Also roasted moose is delicious, but be careful with timings or it will dry out. I'm afraid I don't know the exact timings. I tried asking my neighbour once, but he just said cook it until its done. He also makes his own moose burgers, but not sure what the ingredients are. If it's anything like Norwegian beef burgers, they will contain ground moose meat, eggs and potato flower for binding, seasoning and milk for flavour. Delicious with a rich gravy and steamed veg, and of course the traditional accompanyments of lingonberry jam or rowan jelly.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    11
    I've been cooking similar cuts of the very lean deer we've gotten this year by putting them in the crock pot with onions and garlic and veggie stock (and sometimes water) to cover. Cook all day on low. Nice treat at the end of a work day. Meat ends up very tender and not dry. Don't see why this wouldn't work for moose. I think the clay baker with lid would work very well too in terms of keeping meat moist and tender. I wonder if a dutch oven with lid in oven on low heat for hours and hours would work, too?

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,336
    I just had my first ever moose meat. I cooked up the ground meat I got into a shepherd's pie. Lots of onions, celery, peas, corn, carrots, and made it quite moist with plenty of water and bisto. I topped it up with yukon gold potatoes and a sweet potato for a hint of sweetness. As the meat was organic, 95% of the rest of the ingredients were also organic.

    I brought it into work and shared with 3 coworkers and they raved about it. I would say if nobody told me it was moose, I wouldn't have questioned it. It tasted slightly gamey, but nothing like lamb.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •