Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati
    Posts
    332

    What do you do when you see little girls rocking the trail?

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    A little background - I race Sport Class here in the midwest and will be catting up to Expert next season. Our races don't draw a huge women's field so I never have any real competition (hence the reason for moving up to Expert). I'm always trying to encourage other women to ride/race mtb's.

    I'm also a mtb instructor and have taught at quite a few women's clinic's.

    Today we (myself and the REST guys - like usual) were rocking the trail and came along a bunch of guys with a little girl (8 -10 yrs old) on a xmart type bike (complete with basket) just moseying along. As we passed, I made sure to stop at the girl and ask her to give me a high five for bringing all the guys out to ride (looked like a father figure and bunch of his football buddies). We met up with them again along the trail and as we passed she smiled and waved to which I said "Keep it up little girl!"

    At the trailhead, I heard her say, "look dad, there's that mountain biker girl".

    My honey thinks it's sweet that I'm always telling all the little girls they look awesome.

    Do you guys do anything like this? Just wanted to know if I was the only oddball. I just want these little gals to have positive riding experiences. They will be the one's kicking my butt when they get older!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    5,316

    yep

    We have quite a few young ones (5-10yrs) that do the kids races with our local club. It's quite frightening when a 10yr old girl's faster than me... Most of the little ones that do participate have parents that race as well on the same day etc.

    If I do come accross little ones on the trail, I normally say something nice & hope it makes them want to come out on the dirt over n over again.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    271
    As the mother of an 11yo girl I salute you both!

    I try pretty hard (without trying to look like I'm trying hard) to encourage her to get out in the forest to ride with us. Success is relative - as in, sometimes it's better if you don't ride with a relative!!!

    I have found my greatest success in getting her out on the bike in the forest is finding other girls of a similar age who also go out for a ride with their parents (Dads mostly). We have founded a very casual thing called "The Princess Rides" where anybody with a little girl can come and we trek across town to the easiest forest in Brisbane for a ride. They all seem to have a lot of fun and we work on skills - getting off and spotting them individually over logs and rocks and stuff. They seem to take to it much better without boys along who are much braver!

    Also, one of the local race organisers who does our enduro races organises kids races during the main race - just a couple of laps around the marshalling area. All the kids get a prize and can tackle it at their own pace - or even have their parent ride along with them if they like. It really encourages them. My daughter has ridden in a few.

    Keep up the encouragement - they need positive role models that aren't their parents!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Md suburbs of Wash. DC
    Posts
    2,131
    I try to give that sort of encouragement to any kid I see out on a bike ride, whether girl or boy. Back when I had a computer on my bike, I'd make a big deal about how fast they were riding. And I always ask if they're having fun.
    "How about if we all just try to follow these very simple rules of the road? Drive like the person ahead on the bike is your son/daughter. Ride like the cars are ambulances carrying your loved ones to the emergency room. This should cover everything, unless you are a complete sociopath."
    David Desautels, in a letter to velonews.com

    Random babblings and some stuff to look at.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,627
    This is not bike related but regarding a hike DH and I went on. We passed this family hiking with there son who was about 4 years old. It is a pretty tough hike for a lot of adults so when we saw him DH said " Holy cow you are doing great" to the little boy. The boy answered "I am not a cow, I am a boy" Made his parents and us laugh.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati
    Posts
    332
    Quote Originally Posted by solobiker View Post
    This is not bike related but regarding a hike DH and I went on. We passed this family hiking with there son who was about 4 years old. It is a pretty tough hike for a lot of adults so when we saw him DH said " Holy cow you are doing great" to the little boy. The boy answered "I am not a cow, I am a boy" Made his parents and us laugh.

    hahahahahhahah - thanks for making me laugh and spit Myoplex at the same time.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,609
    If they're not wearing a helmet, I'll say something like, "you would look so much cuter if you were wearing your helmet!"
    For 3 days, I get to part of a thousand other journeys.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,316
    I've been known to yell out, "Woohooo! You go, baby!" to girls I see out on their bikes.

    Roxy
    Getting in touch with my inner try-athlete.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Black Hills of SD
    Posts
    698
    Quote Originally Posted by Pedal Wench View Post
    If they're not wearing a helmet, I'll say something like, "you would look so much cuter if you were wearing your helmet!"
    I saw the most adorable little girl on a Stryder with a bright pink helmet on. She pointed to my helmet, then thumped herself on her helmet and said, loudly, "Hat!" with a huge grin on her little face. Her mom said she points out all the other riders with helmets. It made my day!

    Deb

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    182
    That's excellent...you know, you may have just given her the confidence to keep it up, and she could be the one really rockin' the races in a few years! Or if not, at least she'll be lovin' her ride!
    Let's all keep encouraging the dirty girls!!

    Quote Originally Posted by TrekJeni View Post
    A little background - I race Sport Class here in the midwest and will be catting up to Expert next season. Our races don't draw a huge women's field so I never have any real competition (hence the reason for moving up to Expert). I'm always trying to encourage other women to ride/race mtb's.

    I'm also a mtb instructor and have taught at quite a few women's clinic's.

    Today we (myself and the REST guys - like usual) were rocking the trail and came along a bunch of guys with a little girl (8 -10 yrs old) on a xmart type bike (complete with basket) just moseying along. As we passed, I made sure to stop at the girl and ask her to give me a high five for bringing all the guys out to ride (looked like a father figure and bunch of his football buddies). We met up with them again along the trail and as we passed she smiled and waved to which I said "Keep it up little girl!"

    At the trailhead, I heard her say, "look dad, there's that mountain biker girl".

    My honey thinks it's sweet that I'm always telling all the little girls they look awesome.

    Do you guys do anything like this? Just wanted to know if I was the only oddball. I just want these little gals to have positive riding experiences. They will be the one's kicking my butt when they get older!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
    Posts
    6,984
    Quote Originally Posted by pinkbikes View Post
    As the mother of an 11yo girl I salute you both!

    I try pretty hard (without trying to look like I'm trying hard) to encourage her to get out in the forest to ride with us. Success is relative - as in, sometimes it's better if you don't ride with a relative!!!

    I have found my greatest success in getting her out on the bike in the forest is finding other girls of a similar age who also go out for a ride with their parents (Dads mostly). We have founded a very casual thing called "The Princess Rides" where anybody with a little girl can come and we trek across town to the easiest forest in Brisbane for a ride. They all seem to have a lot of fun and we work on skills - getting off and spotting them individually over logs and rocks and stuff. They seem to take to it much better without boys along who are much braver!

    Also, one of the local race organisers who does our enduro races organises kids races during the main race - just a couple of laps around the marshalling area. All the kids get a prize and can tackle it at their own pace - or even have their parent ride along with them if they like. It really encourages them. My daughter has ridden in a few.

    Keep up the encouragement - they need positive role models that aren't their parents!

    Great idea pinkbikes of taking the girls along.
    Minimally if I'm whipping along on the bike, and any child who rides consciously to one side to let me pass by, I always cheerfully thank them. Every gesture of courtesy on bike routes helps.

    I saw the most adorable little girl on a Stryder with a bright pink helmet on. She pointed to my helmet, then thumped herself on her helmet and said, loudly, "Hat!" with a huge grin on her little face. Her mom said she points out all the other riders with helmets. It made my day!
    So cute, blackshill.


    As for encouraging little kids, teens also need encouragement.
    AFter all these years at cycling events, on road rides, bike routes that aren't stacked with cars, it's rare that I see teenage girls cycling on a regular basis compared to much younger girls. The mtbike world probably sees them there (I'm not a mtbiker.) plus the teenage boys, but overall, I wonder just on bike paths and roads where it's not busy and safe from too many cars/high speed traffic. And I've lived in cities with significantly higher number of cyclists with available signed bike routes.
    My Personal blog on cycling & other favourite passions.
    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know what’s in a person’s heart.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Ventura County CA
    Posts
    605
    My brother-in-law takes his little girl out on a trail-a-bike while 8 year old big brother rides along. That's getting them started early!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by pinkbikes View Post
    As the mother of an 11yo girl I salute you both!

    I try pretty hard (without trying to look like I'm trying hard) to encourage her to get out in the forest to ride with us. Success is relative - as in, sometimes it's better if you don't ride with a relative!!!

    I have found my greatest success in getting her out on the bike in the forest is finding other girls of a similar age who also go out for a ride with their parents (Dads mostly). We have founded a very casual thing called "The Princess Rides" where anybody with a little girl can come and we trek across town to the easiest forest in Brisbane for a ride. They all seem to have a lot of fun and we work on skills - getting off and spotting them individually over logs and rocks and stuff. They seem to take to it much better without boys along who are much braver!

    Also, one of the local race organisers who does our enduro races organises kids races during the main race - just a couple of laps around the marshalling area. All the kids get a prize and can tackle it at their own pace - or even have their parent ride along with them if they like. It really encourages them. My daughter has ridden in a few.

    Keep up the encouragement - they need positive role models that aren't their parents!
    Hey Pinkbikes, that's totally cool! I am from Bris also and it's really great to have all the kidds (esp girls!) out in the sport!

    I am also a MTB coach and am looking for some juniors (probably from about 13–18) to coach at a state level.

    PM me if you know anyone who is after skills/fitness coaching in that age group! It is, after all, the future of the sport!

    Anna

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    167
    I was just telling DH the other day how shocked I am that I don't see more women on the trail. We haven't been MTBing very long, (since Feb.) but I think I have only about 4 other women. None of them were anywhere near my age. Sad, really.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •