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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Weir, TX
    Posts
    403

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    Quote Originally Posted by lph View Post
    So what do you call them?
    Here where we have no snow, nothing To us it sounds as foreign as putting your boots/gloves on the radiator to dry out....

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    94
    Quote Originally Posted by lph View Post
    oops, sorry. I never think that I might not be using the right name. If it sounds good to me, I go for it

    A large, well, cupboard or locker, if you like, looks like a large fridge. Metal. Has a heating element and a fan installed at the top that blows warm air down inside, and is "furnished" with racks inside to hang clothes on. Commonly used to dry clothes or laundry indoors but they make a bit of a racket. We have 5! of them at my workplace, dearly beloved by the winter cyclists.

    So what do you call them?

    Oh wow!
    I've never seen (or heard) about such a thing! Cool! What state do you live in? Lots of people have these? In houses ever, or just offices and such?

    I live in Texas...so...well..yeah.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    4,066
    I live in that long thin state, way north, called Norway

    Funny, I just assumed everybody knew what these were! They're fairly common at schools and suchlike, not quite as common in homes since they're noisy, but some people have them. They're good for drying wet outerwear, heavy jackets, shoes etc, that wouldn't do well in a dryer.
    Winter riding is much less about badassery and much more about bundle-uppery. - malkin

    1995 Kona Cinder Cone commuterFrankenbike/Selle Italia SLR Lady Gel Flow
    2008 white Nakamura Summit Custom mtb/Terry Falcon X
    2000 Schwinn Fastback Comp road bike/Specialized Jett

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    94
    Quote Originally Posted by lph View Post
    I live in that long thin state, way north, called Norway

    Funny, I just assumed everybody knew what these were! They're fairly common at schools and suchlike, not quite as common in homes since they're noisy, but some people have them. They're good for drying wet outerwear, heavy jackets, shoes etc, that wouldn't do well in a dryer.

    Oh, Norway is now a state?!?! JK!

    Very interesting! I can see how these would be really good to have in snowy/rainy places!

    I'm surprised I haven't seen them in Colorado. Maybe this is just a non-US phenomenon?

    I'm super envious of your drying cupboards at work!

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,841
    The US is fairly backwards in respect to Europe sometimes...

    They have towel warmers and trouser presses, and all that good stuff standard.

    We have to like specifically go out of our way to get things like that.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Rhode Island
    Posts
    1,365
    Layers because it is often that we overdress rather than underdress, then drying sweat makes ya cold.

    I do:

    polyester or other synthetic base layer (either a jersey or a tight fitting underarmor shirt)

    light alpaca wool or other wool sweater

    high vis windbreaker (that has no insulation.) It breathes, but keeps the wind out.

    If it's raining, gym warmup pants over my capris or shorts.

    Wool socks.

    garden gloves over a liner (sometimes.) You can get those rubber dipped garden gloves at the hardware store - they are nice because the rubber grips, is tough, and insulates, but the fabric side breathes.

    Alpaca hat/beanie or a synthetic balacava or a synthetic (coolmax) buff under the helmet.

    That's it!

    It starts out chilly, but after five minutes I am warmed up. Best, I am not overdressed, which I think is worse than being underdressed. I hate being hot on the bike.
    I can do five more miles.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3,176
    We don't even have coat rooms.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    94
    Quote Originally Posted by indigoiis View Post

    garden gloves over a liner (sometimes.) You can get those rubber dipped garden gloves at the hardware store - they are nice because the rubber grips, is tough, and insulates, but the fabric side breathes.

    A

    Garden gloves---good idea! A different take on the kitchen gloves!

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    10
    I live in Portland, and riding in the rain is unavoidable. My commute is about 10 miles each way, and I really like the helly hansen freeze long johns (polypro inside/merino outside) topped with a wool sweater and finally a waterproof shell. I have gloves that are somewhat waterproof, and love my swrve knickers with the fleece insides. Rainpants suck a bit, and I can't seem to find a pair small enough to fit, but the knickers are water resistant and allow me to move comfortably. Oh...long wool socks rock!

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    4,066
    I just read a strange but possibly good tip for riding in the rain - chop off some old rain pants below the knee and make "rain shorts". Supposed to keep off the worst rain from above/in front, stop the worst of the splash from behind onto your shorts, but still let air circulate much better than rain pants. I have yet to ride in rain pants and not wonder whether I would've been dryer without.
    Winter riding is much less about badassery and much more about bundle-uppery. - malkin

    1995 Kona Cinder Cone commuterFrankenbike/Selle Italia SLR Lady Gel Flow
    2008 white Nakamura Summit Custom mtb/Terry Falcon X
    2000 Schwinn Fastback Comp road bike/Specialized Jett

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Beautiful NW or Left Coast
    Posts
    5,619
    We are in agreement, Rainpants are good for a short commute only.
    I want a drying cupboard! we have drying racks that we set over heat vents.
    I like Bikes - Mimi
    Watercolor Blog

    Davidson Custom Bike - Cavaletta
    Dahon 2009 Sport - Luna
    Old Raleigh Mixte - Mitzi

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    3,150
    Never heard of a drying cupboards in this part of the planet, either! How much energy do they suck up?

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Beautiful NW or Left Coast
    Posts
    5,619
    Couldn't be too much, it's just powered by a fan.
    I like Bikes - Mimi
    Watercolor Blog

    Davidson Custom Bike - Cavaletta
    Dahon 2009 Sport - Luna
    Old Raleigh Mixte - Mitzi

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    4,066
    Here ya go, ladies - the drying cabinet:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drying_cabinet

    The one in the photo is about twice the size of the ones we have at work, and looks a bit more fancy.

    Another one:
    http://www.staber.com/dryingcabinet

    Funny that they call it a "high-end product" - they're pretty standard in kindergartens and schools here and are not considered high end at all.
    Winter riding is much less about badassery and much more about bundle-uppery. - malkin

    1995 Kona Cinder Cone commuterFrankenbike/Selle Italia SLR Lady Gel Flow
    2008 white Nakamura Summit Custom mtb/Terry Falcon X
    2000 Schwinn Fastback Comp road bike/Specialized Jett

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,841
    From what I've noticed, most european appliances are a lot more energy efficient & conscious than American versions... so I'm sure a drying cabinet doesn't take much and is way better than a dryer.

 

 

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