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Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    5

    Whats the right attire for cycling?

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    Hi ladies, I've recently took up cycling as a hobby and was wondering if there is a certain attire i'm suppose to wear? Any suggestions would be fab!
    Thanks.
    Joanne

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Saskatoon, Sask.
    Posts
    345
    It depends on how far, and where, you are riding. If you're just cruising around the neighbourhood for up to an hour, regular athletic clothing might be all right. If you're riding to the store or work in 20 minutes or less and aren't in a hurry, you could just wear what you have on at the time.
    When you get into long rides of an hour or more, you might want to look into cycling-specific clothing for the comfort factor. Especially shorts.
    Queen of the sea beasts

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    19
    I second the suggestion on the cycling specific shorts. When I first started riding, I was opposed to looking like a lycra sausage, so I just used regular workout shorts. I quickly gave in, and switched to cycling shorts, which are much more comfortable on the tush! I only wear the straight-up lycra shorts by themselves on 50+ mile rides. On every other ride, I wear a skort or mountain bike shorts with a cycling liner underneath (they're like regular bike shorts with the chamois, but they have more ventilation). It's more modest than head-to-toe lycra and I feel more comfortable when I'm getting lunch after a ride. Team Estrogen should have some options on their site. I've purchased tons of clothing from TE. I've also bought some great mountain bike shorts and skorts from REI.

    Oh, and note that when you're wearing bike shorts, don't wear undies. It sounds gross to be panty-free, but wearing underwear beneath your cycling shorts can cause chafing, which is no fun. You only need to get one saddle sore to get over the ick factor of going commando.

    On rides under 20 miles, I'd say you're fine in a regular workout tee, assuming you have pouches on your bike for your essentials (keys, spare tube, patch kit, bike tools, cell phone, and some calories for in case you get a flat or get hurt and are stuck waiting for help or fixing your tire). If you're riding on a longer ride, you'll want a bike jersey that has pockets in the back for storage of your granola bars, energy gels, etc.

    I'd also recommend cycling gloves and a helmet liner. The gloves are an absolute must. They'll save your hands from numbness. I did without the helmet liner at first, but once I got one, I was so glad I did. I never realized how much more comfortable my head could be. It wicks sweat and reduces the friction from the helmet on your noggin. Mine is from Pace Sportswear, and it was pretty cheap (under $15 on sale) and it's made in the USA. see www.pacesportswear.com

    If you get serious about cycling longer distances, I'd recommend buying cycling-specific shoes and clipless pedals. I waited a little while before I took the plunge into Cliplessville, but I'm glad I did. It makes for much more efficient pedaling. Even though I bike on the roads, I bought mountain bike shoes, because they're easier to walk around in when you're off the bike. (If I was serious about speed, I would have gotten road bike shoes.)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    4,713
    If you're doing short distances/times, whatever's comfy is fine, though as it gets warmer, I'd suggest wicking athletic clothing. For longer distances, definitely invest in a pair of cycling shorts (Lycra, baggy, or a skort, whatever's more comfortable). A jersey with pockets is helpful for holding all your your essentials. Gloves, I think, are a must. They provide a little extra padding if you want it, but the biggest benefit, I think, is that they protect your palms if you crash.
    At least I don't leave slime trails.
    http://wholecog.wordpress.com/

    2009 Giant Avail 3 |Specialized Jett 143

    2013 Charge Filter Apex| Specialized Jett 143
    1996(?) Giant Iguana 630|Specialized Riva


    Saving for the next one...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,446
    The gloves are a must to save your hands if you crash.

    Minimum safety equipment apparel includes cycling specific helmet, gloves, and sunglasses. (Gloves and sunglasses don't have to be cycling specific, helmet does, they are rated for cycling crashes).

    Also nice are a wicking jersey and shorts with a chamois.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    86
    I don't have anything to add except that I think the next item I'm going to purchase might be one of those wool based bras. Even the bras I have that are supposed to be wicking don't really wick. But I've been cycling casually for years and more intensively the past two years and I haven't felt the need for that until know.
    2011 Trek Madone 4.5 WSD

    2011 Trek FX7.2--What can I say? It was on sale!

 

 

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