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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    N. California
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    Heart Rate Monitors

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    I'm deciding whether or not to shell out the $ for one for boyfriend and I, we're both stuggling with some extra pounds. If you have one, do you use it? Love/hate it?
    Be yourself, to the extreme!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    somewhere between the Red & Rio Grande
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    I have the Polar F6 in fun tea green. I like it a lot but admittedly I have no clue what it is telling me. One day I might get a book until then it is just a watch and fancy data.
    Amanda

    2011 Specialized Epic Comp 29er | Specialized Phenom | "Marie Laveau"
    2007 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Road | Selle Italia Lady Gel Flow | "Miranda"


    You don't have to be great to get started, but you do have to get started to be great. -Lee J. Colan

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
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    5,897
    I bought a Polar HRM about 4 years ago. I never used it for targeting specific heart rate zones during training. It was more to keep track of how my HR changed during rides and over the course of the season. When the battery died in the chest strap, I didn't bother to send it to Polar to have it replaced.

    I still it as a speedometer, odometer and cadence meter. If/when it dies, I probably won't get another HRM. I would consider a GPS/cyclecomputer instead.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    MI
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    2,543
    I had a basic Polar HR monitor with the chest strap--I can't remember exactly which model.

    But it had a timer, HR, calories burned, hr zones . . .

    I really enjoyed using it. I know that the calories burned were not 100% accurate and that it tend to be over--as I hear is the case with most HR monitor's.

    I used it comparatively. It gave me an idea of how hard I was working during each of my workouts. I really enjoyed being able to monitor what I was doing. And it really motivated me to work harder.

    I lost the chest strap last year and can't find it anywhere. I would definitely consider getting another Polar. If I had the money, however, I would love to get one that has GPS and is MAC compatible like the Nike Triax Elite.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
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    I don't think it's any use for weight loss, if that's what your main focus is. Perceived exertion (and persistence!) will get you much farther along those lines than a HRM will.

    I like it just because I'm a data geek. But it's also useful for building (and watching myself build) cardio capacity doing intervals.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    northern california
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    1,460
    I used to use one before getting a pacemaker made it a moot point... I think they're the most useful if you have your heart rate zones and lactate threshold determined by testing first. Then you can use you rate to determine whether or not you're working in a primarily fat burning or carb burning zone. If you're using it mostly as a weight loss tool, you'd want to know that you're in a fat burning zone most of the time.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    3,867
    Mine was very useful for weight loss. I bought it because I would plateau quite frequently and I needed some hard(er) data to figure out where the problem was without driving to a large city to get all the testing done. It worked in the same way having a kitchen scale to measure my food did. Whether either of the relatively inexpensive devices were accurate according to some ANSI standards, I wasn't comparing against ANSI standards. They were measuring tools which I could use to measure against themselves in the context of my whole plan. Seeing that hard data helped me with weight loss.

    Karen
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    insidious ungovernable cardboard

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
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    5,897
    When I first got my HRM, I had fun wearing it while I was sleeping to get my true resting heart rate. I usually wake up once or twice before the alarm clock goes off, so for a few days I kept the HRM on the nightstand, and when I would wake up an hour or so before the alarm, I would put the chest strap on and go back to sleep. Then when the alarm went off I would check what my heart rate was for that hour or so. It was in the low-mid 50s, whereas my "resting heart rate" during the day is in the 60s.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    somewhere between the Red & Rio Grande
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    I think it may help you realize you aren't getting as hard of a workout from riding and maybe adjust your eating? Or maybe you are getting a hard workout and not fueling enough.

    I found I gained a lot of weight when I didn't run because I thought I was riding hard and therefore I was eating a lot. My perception of how much 4 hours of riding really was working was off. I don't know if the HRM helps, I have lost 25 lbs since getting mine. I also started running again and have paid more attention to my food choices. It can be a tool to add to your arsenal but won't get you there alone.
    Amanda

    2011 Specialized Epic Comp 29er | Specialized Phenom | "Marie Laveau"
    2007 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Road | Selle Italia Lady Gel Flow | "Miranda"


    You don't have to be great to get started, but you do have to get started to be great. -Lee J. Colan

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
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    Quote Originally Posted by ny biker View Post
    When I first got my HRM, I had fun wearing it while I was sleeping to get my true resting heart rate. I usually wake up once or twice before the alarm clock goes off, so for a few days I kept the HRM on the nightstand, and when I would wake up an hour or so before the alarm, I would put the chest strap on and go back to sleep. Then when the alarm went off I would check what my heart rate was for that hour or so. It was in the low-mid 50s, whereas my "resting heart rate" during the day is in the 60s.
    I'd really like to try that but I'm afraid the strap will be so uncomfortable I won't fall asleep. Like I said, I'm a total data geek.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    77
    Sleeping heart rate? I'll be trying that!

    I'm a data geek as well, and have always found having an HRM helpful. Mine wasn't too expensive, it's a polar s150. I bought it for running a few years ago but like having it for the turbo as I use a cycling workout plan that combines rate of perceived exertion with hear rate. For me, seeing the heart rate values all the time on the trainer has helped me "tune-up" my perceived exertion so that when I'm outside riding and not looking at the data so much, I'm still getting the same benefit from cycling. I can't comment on how much this would help with weight loss specifically, but it's really helped me get my fitness level up...

    L : )

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    714
    I have a Polar RS800 and I wear it constantly when I ride or exercise. My goal is weight loss and I have found that my body gets rid of fat better when I work out at 65% of my max heart rate. I also use it for interval training, I'm absolutely addicted to my polar. I also have a polar mounted on my bike. Sometimes I ignore the high heart rates because I'm having fun, but I pay attention to it when I want to concentrate on fat burning zone.
    ----------------------------------------------------
    "I never made "Who's Who"- but sure as hell I made "What's That??..."

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Between the Blue Ridge and the Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    5,203
    I use (or used) my very basic Polar HRM in spinning class. It helped me stay in my target zone. Interestingly, I found that I was able to slow down because I was often over my target zone.

    Unfortunately, I inadvertently left the wrist part on the spin bike at the gym a few weeks back, and so I only have the strap. Anyone know if I can just get another wrist part, or do I have to buy them together?

 

 

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